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THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 






GAUGE O 





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4 






Manufactured by 



MECCANO 



LIVERPOOL 




MECCANO 







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BRIGHT UCHT mm 

ftftf* C2S4 3 5v 7|<S« R€f , QI 4B 3 5* 7jd. 

All hi rt 1 1 1mm . BmUoorn * Ad a re M*C .S . Ca 

P roH CATALOGUE, CNDSVtOUAl. «ULB!l IWf»~ ™ 



Hef, 



.now sun 

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fW CMAW3I mil PQXTACft 

NEVILLE PLACE. 






The Purchase Tax uponl Bulb is 2d., upon 2 is 33d.. upon 3 is 5d, DoquotcRef.8 














The weapons and accomplishments 
of long 



make 



very 



hobbies and sport for to-day. 
Try your hand at Archery 



it ' j 



as easy as it looks, it demands ski/1 








and eye 



on mt 



on n 



ormyour 

fays. 



Jin iioD 



WRITE FOR 



HAM LEY- BROTHERS • LTO 



catalogue — they have everything you 

Our only address: 

202 f REGENT STREET, LONDON W.l 









55/9,21/ 



TARGETS, from g/6, n/6, 13/6 



(despatch qd.) t 



5 ft, 6 ins., for 



targets up to 30 ins. diameter, 15/- (desp. 9d.). 

BOWS, 3 ft. 3 ins. 8/6, 4 ft. 6 ins. 14/6, 5 ft. 
6 ins. 17/6, 6 ft. 2r/- (despatch 9d.). 






ARROWS, 10/6, 16/6,18/6 a dozen (desp.gd.). 
1VER & BELT, 10/6 (despatch jd.}. 



m 












h 



so you 








new and 



d 



-JC Ash your toy dealer for full 

*. . _ 



or write 



UTCTS 



agent and 



name qj nca 

for this illustrated Chemistry 

Spares List— 2d. stamp on PX1. 

or J ltd. stamp on Utters* please. 




BRICKS 




* 





NEW FLYING 
KITS 

To build J* scale 
flying models with 
all main external 



details incorporated, 
Each kic is complete 
with all Balsa wood, 
glue, etc, and detailed 
drawing. 

Supermarme "Spitfire" 

Miles ••Maglscer" 

Foster Wikner "Wlcko" 
Hawker "Fury" Mark II 
Hawker Hind... 




* i> n 



r i 



kv * ■ 



* ft I 



. . • 



4/3 

3/6 
4/9 







* * P 



Hawker Hurricane 



De Havilland "Tiger Moth",,. 
DeHavilland' 



** w 



¥ 9 f 



Leopard Moth 1 * 
Fairey -1 Bmlc" 
Wescland i# Lysander M 
Special Freelance Duration 
Flying Model ,- Lark" 
Postage 64, extra per kit 



m. * * 



4/3 
4/3 

6/6 
6/- 

6/- 



\\ 



rr 



ENDEAVOUR 

YACHTS 

These new Yachts are the latest 
thing for fast racing work. All of 
the hulls are hand made in best 
yellow pine # Cabin skylight extra. 

Prices: 

17-itn Yacht with automatic 
rudder 

21 -in. Yacht with 
rudder 



* » * 



* . * 



* • ■ , m m I *| f J| 

automatic 

22/2 



27-ln, Yacht with Braine type 







steering „ 47/5 

36-in. Yacht with Braine type 

steering ... ... ... 90/- 

rrt 

Bond's New Catalogue will be 
ready soon. Send Bid. for same 
and secure your copy directly they 
are available. 






BOND 




O 



t 




USTON 



ROAD 



LTD 





Teleph 



Euston Road, London N.W.I 



one: EUSton 5441-2. 



Est. 1887 



I ft 

11 



THE 









■ 4 




KETT" Sadd 



M 



" 



An untouched photo of our gau£e 1 

Tank Locomotive (see bargains below), 

Readers will be glad to learn that despite the Limitation of Supplies and the 
fact that the greater percentage of our skilled workers are engaged on work 
of National Importance, we are still able to provide CERTAIN MODELS 
FREE OF PURCHASE TAX. 

Here are details of a few of these Wartime Bargains! 
Gauge 1 "Peckett" Saddle Tank Locomotive, An 0-4-0 type model accurate ly 
designed with the short wheel base favoured both on the real and the model 
railway, because engine* can in consequence traverse curves of very short 
radius. Firsc-class clockwork mechanism, hand-enamelled, cast iron w 

Gauge 1 scale STANDARD TANK No. 112, 0-4-0 type, hand-enamelled in 
correct L,MS. ( C,R„ L.N.E.R., L. & N.W.R., G.W.R. and S.R. colours. With 
powerful clockwork mechanism. 
A BARGAIN AT £1 . 10.0 

Gauge "0" 6-couptcd Goods Locomotive. L.M,$. or L.N.E.R. colours. With 

junior permg. motor 6-8 volt. d.c. 

STILL AVAILABLE AT £2 . O . O 



■ • v « | • • * . * * 






GR.I7, 
TTJ7. 

AB.I7. 



BOOKS AND CATALOGUES 



S.I7, 



Latest Gauge 
Up-to-date Gauge 
Steam Locomotives. 
Model Constructor, fid 



list. 6d. 
"OCT booklet 



3d, post free. 
nary Engines and Everything 
post free. 
Scale Model Ships and Ship Fittings. 6d. 

ALSO the famous new edition of the MODEL RAILWAY HANDBOOK 

4d. 



rice 



postage 



BASSETT-LOWKE LTD., NORTHAMPTON 

London: 112, High Holborn, W.C.I. , Manchester: 28, Corporation Stroot 







Run your model railway on the right 

MILBRO 
sleepers 



true-to-scale 



perfect replicas of the real 

Send 6d, for 100~page catalogue. 



Prices: 



Steel Rails 



Battens ... 
Sleepers... 

Steel Fishplates 

Die Cast Chairs 

Point Levers 



p * * 



#*« 



in 



* ft 4 



m mm 



2/- doz. yds. 
2/3 doz. 
2/- per 100 
5d* per doz. 
1/9 per 100 
1/- each 




TRUE-TO-SCALE 



At! prices subject to IS% increase. 






CK 





RTS 



MILLS BROS. Model Engineers) LTD., DepL M.M.. ST. MARYS ROAD. SHEFFIELD 

London Showrooms: 2, Victoria Colonnade. Victoria House, Southampton Row. W.C.I 








ROM 















With the aid of "Plasticine" your Meccano models can be made 
ifelike. The effects you achieve, will not only supplement your 
constructions, but will give you hours of amusement Made in sixteen 

colours. Obtainable in many attractive outfits. 

PRICES AND FULL PARTICULARS ON APPLICATION 




A 










HARBUTT'S PLASTICINE LTD., 99, BATHAMPTON, BATH 








H 




tfc 






w 



N 





ON 



11 













SURE WINNER 




PREMIER OF THE SKIES 



A Wakefield Type, 50 inch span Flying Model 




Kit 



f 







15 



/ 




Plan and Printed Sheets 

Free 




an an 




Printed Sheets 







3'6 Post Free 



« 



SPITFIRES 



HURRICANES 



i 



etc., etc. 






Flying Models, from 4 7 6 Post Free 
Solid Scale Kits of every kind, from 1 7 6 Post Free 

^ ^m ^ — » 

Send 3d. for NEW CATALOGUE, illustrating a full range of Kits 






from 1'3 to 21V All prices subject to 25# Purchase Tax 



ELITE MODEL AIRPLANE SUPPLIES " 



BURY NEW ROAD 
MANCHESTER 8 



■ 







WRITING 



TO 



ADVERTISERS 



Readers are urged to observe the following points when writing to 
advertisers: 

1. Mention the "M.M." and any special reference num- 

quoted in the advertisement. This helps the 
advertisers to give prompt attention* 







2. See that the full amount of the price and any post- 
age is included. It is unfair to expect advertisers to 
fulfil their undertakings promptly if short remit- 
tances are sent. 



3. Give your full address, and most important of all, 

WRITE PLAINLY. 

* THE ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER, 



MECCANO MAGAZINE, BINN5 ROAD, LIVERPOOL 13 






THE 




MAGAZINE 






■ 9 - 

m 




r 





















The parts fn these Outfits are all nterchangeable on the famous 
Meccano principle, and splendid miniature aircraft (non-fly tng) can 
be built with them. The Instruction manuals included in the Outfits 
show clearly how to construct a number of interesting models. 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

The No. 00 Outfit is now available in Camouflage as well as in Blue 
and White. The No. Outfit is supplied in Service Grey as well as in 




This tight biplane in Service 

camouflage, is a model made 

with Outfit No. 00. 



Red and Crea 





Here is a model seaplane 
made with Outfit No. 0. 



PRICES OF OUTFITS 









No. 00 Aeroplane Outfit, Blue and White.., Price 6/- With Purchase Tax 7/3 



No. 00 
No. 

No. 



»i 



*r 









>f 



»* 



it 



» 



Camouflaged 



Red and 




4 « 



ream. 



Service Grey 



t* 



>t 




* * * 



9$ 



7/9 
7/9 



*f 



»J 



" 



«t 



tt 



f# 



1# 



»i 



if 




9/6 
9/6 







— 



*< 





»» 








of this beautifully-designed Doll's 
House represents a half-timbered dwelling, while the 
interior decorations, which are printed in nine colours, 
are in an attractive modem style. 




Reinforced leather board is the material of whtch 
the house is constructed, and although it is collapsible 
it is as strong as a wood structure when set up. The 

container, which also is made of reinforced leather 
board, opens out to show a lovely garden, with 






tennis lawn, carriage drive and rockery. 



I 




The Couch 
Hammock. Tennis 
Net* Garden Seats. 

Dinky Toys Garage, 
Motor Cars and 
Figures* and the Hornby 
Trees and Hed gin e 
Featured in the illustration 

not included with the 
Doll's House and Garden. 



DIMENSIONS 

■ • 

The following are the 

dimensions of the 
"•Dolly Varden" Doll's 

House when built up ready 
for play. Length, 1 ft, 6j in. 
Depth. 0J im Height, 
1 ft. Si in. 



i 
i 



i 






List Price 6 

Price with Tax 8*3 



The open 
which the 
measures 3 
2 ft. 5* in. 



container on 
house stands 
ft. 3} in, by 



i 









* 






M 





CANO LIMIT 






INNS ROAD 



LIV 






OOL 



13 



XV 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 




k 






THE FASCINATING COLLECTING HOBBY 






Dinky Toys owe their popularity to their scale proportions, 
wealth of detail, and attractive finish. There are over 300 
items now in the range. Ask your dealer for prices or write 
direct to Meccano Ltd., Binns Road, Liverpool, for a copy of 

the latest complete price list. 









VICKERS SUPERMARINE 
"SPITFIRE" FIGHTER 

(Camouflaged) 




Dinky Toys No. 62e 

Scale model of the Vickers-Supermartne 

"Spitfire,** one of the fastest fighter air« 

craft used by the Royat Air Force. 

No. 62e Camouflaged 
List Price 8d. Price with Tax 10d. 

No. 62a Aluminium Finish 
List Price 8d. 



Price 




Tax lOd. 



BRISTOL" BLENHEIM BOMBER 

(Camouflaged) 




by 






Dinky Toys No* 62d 
Realistic model of the latest "Bristol" 
Blenheim Bomber extensively used 

the Royal Air Force. 

No. 62d Camouflaged 

List Price 1/0J. Price with Tax 1/3 

No. 62b Aluminium Finish 
List Price 1/0 1 Price with Tax 1/3 



BOEING 'FLYING FORTRESS* 










Dinky Toys No. 62g 
Scale model of Boeing &-17 ""-tying 
Fortress," one of the fastest bombers in 
the world, and extensively used by the 

United States Army Air Corps. 
List Price 1/10 Price with Tax 2/3 



DOUBLE DECKER BUS 








. 29c 



Dinky Toys 
Assorted colours. 
Fitted with detachable rubber tyres. 
List Price 2/H Price wjth Tax 2/7 




I 

1 



18-POUNDER QUICK-FIRING FIELD GUN UNIT 






Dinky Toys No. 162 
Comprises scale models of an 18-pounder Quick-Firing Field Gun. Trailer 

and "Light Dragon* ' Motor Tractor. 
162a "Light Dragon" 162b Trailer Price 104. with Tax 1/- 

Tractor Price 2/8 with Tax 3/3 162c Gun „ 10d- ., 1/- 

Comptete Set Price 4/4 with Tax 6/3 

MECHANISED 



HAWKER "HURRICANE" 
SINGLE-SEATER FIGHTER 

(Camouflaged) 









Dinky Toys No. 156 
This fine set contains the principal units of a modern mechanised army. 

It includes the following items : 

Royal Tank Corps Medium tank Set (Dinky Toys No. 151) without driver. 
Royal Tank Corps Light Tank Set (Dinky Toys No. 152) without driver. 

Mobile Anti-Aircraft Unit (Dinky Toys No. 161). 

18-Pounder Qutck-Firing Field Gun Unit (Dinky Toys No. 162). 

Complete Set List Price 20/6 Price with Tax 25/- 



Dinky Toys No. 62h 
Scale model of the Hawker "Hurricane" 
single-seater Fighter extensively used by 

the R.A.F. 

List Price 96V Price with Tax lid. 



ARMSTRONG WHITW0RTH 
"WHITLEY" BOMBER 



(Camouflaged) 













SHIPS OF THE BRITISH NAVY 







50c 



50e 




Dinky Toys No* 50 
No. 50a Battle Cruiser "Hood" j No. 50b Battleships '•Nelson" Class Gj) ; 
50c Cruiser ; No. 50d Cruiser "York" ; No. 50e Cruiser "Delhi ; 
SOf Destroyers. "Broke" Class (3) ; No. 50g Submarine, "K" Class : 
50h Destroyers "Amazon" Class £3) ; No. 50k Submunne. X Class. 

SOf Price 1 *d. with Tax 2d. 

i|d. 

1 id. 



No. 
No. 

No. 

50a 
50b 
50 c 



Dinky Toys No. 62t 

Scale model of the "Whitley" long-range 

heavy bomber adopted by the R.A.F. 

List Price 1/7* Price with Tax 2/- 



Price 10d. 

8d. 






with Tax 1/- 

I0d. 




50e 



It 



»• 



7$d. 

7U. 

5$d. 



U 

H 



0d. 

9d. 

7d. 



50g 
50h 

50k 



" 



f I 



lid. 



► I 



«« 



2d. 

2d. 



FAIREY "BATTLE" BOMBER 

(Camouflaged) 



2d. 



Complete Set Price 4 11 with Tax 87- * 

MOTOR CARS <*» Drtvers. P,™, »*_» 




36 B 









Dinky Toys No. 60s 

Scale model of the well-known medium 
bomber used in large numbers by the 

R.A.F. 



I 



List Price 11 id. 



Price with Tax 1/f 





5GD 



36F 




SIX-WHEELED WAGON 



Dinky Toys No. 36 
Fitted with detachable rubber tyres. Silver-plated true-to-type radiators, 

■ 






No. 36a Armstrong-Siddeley (Limousine) with, driver 

No. 36b 
No. 36c 

No. 36d 
No. 36e 
No. 36f 

36a 
36b 

36c 





Bentley (Two-seater Sports Coupe) with driver and passenger 
Humber (Vogue Saloon) with driver and footman 
Rover (Streamlined Saloon) with driver and passenger 

(Two-seater Sports) with driver 




British 
British 

Price 1/6| 

1/5* 

1 5 k 



Salmson 

Salmson 



(Four-seater Sports) with driver 







with Tax 1/8 

1/9 



ft 
• f 

Complete 



1/9 



36d 
36 e 

36f 



Price 1/5 i with Tax 1/9 

1/9 
1/9 



if 



i/5| 

1/5* 



Dinky Toys No. 
An interesting model of a modern three 

In assorted colours. 



i i 



ton wagon. 
List Price 1/7J 



Price 




Tax 2/- 



Set Price 8/8 with Tax 10/6 




DINKY 





MANUFACTURED 



BY 



MECCANO 



LTD. 



/ 



LIVERPOOL 







V 



I 







? 



I NT E R N AT 



TL 



M O 



R C R A F T 



SAV.i9 



VI 




















TRI-ANG TRICYCLE No. E2 (Regd. Trade Mark) 




STREAMLINE 






Steel body with opening side door, upholstered seat. Adjustable wind 
screen and direction indicators. 9 in, new type easy-dean wheels 



™ * ■ 

with malleable hubs 



| in. tyres* Hand 
Suitable for ages 4 to 7- 





44 



ins 




Cycle chain drive with free-wheel. Frame and forks best qualky weldless 
cycle tubing. 16 In. front and rear wheels.- 1£ in. jointless sponge-rubber 

Roller lever brake. Ball-bearings throughout. Coil spring saddle. 
CHROMIUM FITTINGS. Black. bli«- or maroon. 



tyres 



TRI-ANG TOYS 

Obtainable from ail 
Good Toy Shops and 

Stores. 











i ftCCP YUAOH M * * * ■ 

MODEL N? 2 




(Regd,) 




DEL No, 2 









* 



-UNITY 1 ' BOY'S CYCLE No. 16 PB 



16 in. frame. Finest quality British tube- Wheels 16 in. x 1 3 in. CHROMIUM 
PLATED rims. Dunlop pneumatic tyres. Roller lever pattern brakes. Three-coil 

saddle. 1 in* x 4 In* roller chain. Ball-bearings throughout. Complete w 

finished In black, blue or maroon. Afl usual bright parts 
CHROMIUM-PLATED. Ages 7 to 11. 



Cycle tubular frame and forks 
rubber tyres* 

Chain cover. 



14 in, wheels. 1$ in. jointless sponge- 
Ball-bearing pedals. Roller lever br. ike. Two-coil saddle* 

CHROMIUM-PLATED FITTINGS. Black, blue or 

maroon. 






and 






• 



ALL TO SCALE CLOCKWORK TOYS 

Almost every type of road transport is represented. Each model is strongly 

and fitted with long-running mechanism and some are fitted 

with electric lights. 





Ml NIC Traffic Control Car 



Ml NIC Mechanical Horse and Lorry with 

Barrels. 



con 










5(50 ml tons 




1 



MINIC Vauxhali Cabriolet. 
Obtainable in camouflage colours* 



MINIC Tank, Length 

3| ins. Obtainable in 

camouflage colours 



MINIC Mechanical Horse and Milk Tanker* 



MINIC Canvas Tile Lorry. 
Obtainable in camouflage colours 





NIC Transport Van 



MINIC Six Wheel Army Lorry 



Made by 



ASK YOUR DEALER TO SHOW YOU THE RANGE OF KUSIC QARAQES 




MINIC Farm Lorry. 







Works 



# 









Next Month: 



MECHANICAL 



HANDLING 






Publi 




shing Date: 







Apri 





Editorial Office: 

Binns Road, Liverpool 13 




aland 






I. i 




No. 3 



March 1941 



With 




Editor 



An Engineer who 





e 



death 



i>n 



30th 




anuary, at 




Meccano 

age of 86, of Dr 



Leaders in 




War 



Hele-Shaw, F.R.S., brought 




a close a long career of 




Sir 



XVI —Sir Alan Brooke 

an Francis Brooke is an 





rma n , 



brilliant work in scientific rese; 




the 




clonment of 




A 



HIV 




and the training of engineers. 
of Meccano boys, however, Dr. Hele-Shaw 










wor 




igh lie was born in France, in 1883, and was educated 



#* 
»■ 





a 





of 




special importance, for 




was 



the 



first 



prom i 




engineer to realise the enormous 




of 







as a 



— 

constructional toy. At that time 
Ire was Professor of Engineering 



at 









rersi 

late Fran! 



e, Live i 





was 



then in the earlv throes of 



developing his invention, and 

■ 

seemed to be making little or no 



headway, lie approached one 
firm after another with a view 



to 




their 
ing 



maim 




unrig 



and 










was interested. He then had the 



happy 




of 




his 



ideas to Dr. Hele-Shaw, and the 



latter prom 





ave his opinion 










that the scheme was based on 

sound engineering principles, and 
that it should have 

success as a constructional 

■ 

letter to 

which he expressed his view was 
largely instrumental in securing 
the financial assistance ncces- 
sary to launch Meccano on its 
unique career, 

At a later date I shall hope 
give some account of the 







ad. After passing through the Roval Military 
* ' * he joined the Royal Field Artillery in 1902, 

and served the first four years of 

south 

nd. In 1906 he was trans- 

> ■ I E L« 




career in 




f erred to India, and three 



was 



later 

Horse Artillery. 





to the Royal 



He 







his service in 




war of 1914-18 by landing in 
France in September 1914 with 
the first Indian contingent, in 




a 



column 




of 



an 



ammunition 






of 



the 




Cavalry J \ ri ga de . 



He achieved 



many successes 
courageous Indian 



with 




his 
and 




in 1917 was awarded the D.S.O. 

He was mentioned 

six times. 

After the war he specialised in 

artillery. 





Commandant of the School of 

Artillery, Inspector of Artillery, 




and Director 
g, War Office 



th 



crisis 



of 





am- 



bef o re 
became 



Chief of the Anti-Aircraft Corps. 
A year later he was promoted to 



the Sout.1 



Command 



T 1 1 




General Sir Alan Francis Brooke, K.C 

Chief, Home 



remarkable range of inventions 

produced by Dr, Hele-Shaw. I did not make his personal 

acquaintance until about 1935, but since that time 



li„ C.B., D.S.O., Com man 
Forces. 



war broke out and he was given 

Army 



comma n 




of 






have 



s 





t some 




hours with him 



* 

in 






his 







Corps of the British Expedition- 
ary Force in France, and he was knighted for his services 
in that capacity and for his -brilliant work in connection 



omce in 




i 




Dunkirk 




of 



»stminster. Even at his then great age he was a man 





ary 



remarkable memory 




and 




He had a 



\v 



Soon after the close of the campaign in France Sir Alan 

ppointed Commander-in-Chief 





j 



it was an unforgettable ex 



perience to listen to him describing, as if it were yesterday, 

his personal contacts with famous men whose names to 
me 



to 

organise the defence of Great Britain against Nazi invasion. 

Brooke has 





otl 




oldiers 



<; 



ir 








Tl i c 



€4 



already almost legendary, 
Meccano Magazine** R.A.F, Radio Fund has now 



* 



hobbies that are far from warlike. He is particularly keen 
on the photography of animal life in its natural haunts, 
and has produced some remarkably interesting films with 



reached a total of over £140, of which £130 has 

forwarded to the R.A.F. Comforts" Committee. 





his cine-camara. 
in times of peace 



tl 




hobby 




which 



mv 



hours of 







h ap p 



and rest 



73 




THE 




MAGAZINE 




L.N.E.R. "Garratt" 2-8-0 -t- 0-8-2 No. 2395, Britain's most powerful locomotive 



•--^M 



^™ 



Th 



\\ 







Ban 







• 



ins 





nchnes 



Precautions 



in 



British 



Practi 










there is one 







c 






locomotive 



working which reveals the 



in 



mood it is surely the 

trains 

it the 



its most spectacular 




of 

especially 











ing 
plished, gives 




its w 

final 




accom- 




blast of its exhaust and then quietly 




behind to 




the train roll 












ever-mcreasmg s 




fi 



over the 



Witnessed 
a bleak 
smoke trails 
away a 

clad hills, 
breasting 



away on its journey. 





the 



crest of 

wi t h the 

m 

M. 

of the engines drifting 
a background of snow- 
sight of a heavy train 




wi 1 1 1 




n 



motives fore 




aft is picturesque 
enough to the layman, but far from 
nspiring to the railway official who 

at an excessive 

tons of 

and 



i 



sees coal being 
rate in 











. 



to 









coaches up a 10-mile 

in all probability at no higher speed 

than 20 or 30 m.p.h.! 

the advent of large num 







• 




of 

of standardised 
designs, and with the more scientific 
use of locomotive power 
made possible, the reduction, 
in some cases even the elimination 

has 






«« 



banking 



t* 




T 




j ways 



Gradients of such seve 




as to 






warrant the use of a special engine 
being attached, 




er in 




the train engine or in rear 

train, for the purpose of surmounting 

a particular "bank/* may not appear 

at first thought to be very numerous. 
This is because the number of 



* 





i t occ ur s 



with 



By D 




Barrie 



passenger trains is extremely small 
relative to the total British mileage; 
some of these instances. 



in America, 




their services are 



i n m 










Beattock 







an in 







on 



the L.M.S., are of course well known 



when the to everybody interested in railways 

Much more extensive provision has 
to be made, however, for assisting 



this country, owing 
loads and stiffer gradients. On some 
of the heaviest grades it is not 
unknown for American freicht trains 



to 







one in 



one i 
the 




two engines in 




freight 



* 



centre, 



and 



a n o t he r 




in rear. 




for a 



behind, the caboose. 




■ 

Three engines to a train. A prc-grouping photograph of a Midland express ascending the Lickey Incline, 1 in 37 



■ 



van 




of reasons 




t rains 

section, with resultant 





engine 



figured largely among the extensive 

locomotive economies achieved by its load on 

the 



the 
the 

line 

capacity; to prevent risk of the 

overmastered by 
rail, and nin- 

to say, with 

continuously 

ing to 

one engine. 

was in the 



Compared with front-end 




a 




train 





rear-end assistance 

rare practice in this country, and its 

use is governed by such meticulous 



precautions to ensure 

in emergency, 




that . 
never 






with 



The last-named 




an 



every 




occurrence 



n/ 



mountainous railways 



on 



on 

the 



American 




and was known 



as 



it 



doubling a hill." Assisting loco- 




r es are 





er engines 



! > 



except 

emploved "except where 
authorised." The sections on which 
it may be practised are invariably 
specified in the working time-tables 
or their appendices, and where bank- 
ing is optional the operating staff are 
also furnished with tables showing 
the maximum loads, in terms 

numbers of 
of 






wagons 










MECCANO MAGAZINE 










U, 2 or 3 




this 



purpose) with which any one engine 



* 



of each class will be allowed to 
tackle the gradient without 







of 

the strict limits within which rear-end 
hanking is confined in this country is 



that on 





are 450 



very 
where it is permitted, and in only 
or so of these eases does the authoritv 








trains. 



to passenger as well as goods 



Safe and proper working of banked 
trains is governed not only by certain 




of the general nil 

home railways, but 
"Local Instructions" 



common to 





ar section. 




a general 
trains which are to receive 
assistance in rear must come to a 









stand 




the 




engine 



closes up gently to the last 




th 



e tram 




not 




journey 




the 



the 



«. 



right-away" 




resume its 

has given 
driver of 



the rear engine, and the latter has 
exchanged two "crow" whistle signals 




the driver of the 







n engine- 




train engine driver does not, of 




course, give his "double crow 

he is satisfied that the 
are off for the train 
Should it become 



* * 



until 

signals 



the train 





running with bank 






engine in rear. 



three 



or more 



short, 




whistles, or a s 





wl 



icre prescribed, are 
either driver as an intimation 




to 




When 




or 




cr 



trains of coaching stock are 





rear, and it is reqitir 

banker should be cou 



thi 





special reason for the bank 
to drop off 



guard must not replace 




s 





i 




tl 



ie 



co n 



tinuous 








con ne 



engines, 



on 




th 
being 



e 



then 
control of 

engine driver. 




brake 

under 

train 




ing 

are 



engines 



in 



r 








-ays coupled 

to a train where the 

includes any 
break, however 













downhill, in 
the upward gradient. 




S 



pea 



also govern 




trams 




r one 



or more engines m 
rear. In all cases the 
train — or pilot- 



engine- 




•i 



—continues 
to carry the ordinary 

denoting the 



Over 




e Top. 



*t 



Perched 



on the banking engine, an enterprising L.M.S. 
photographer secured this unusual picture just as the freight train began to 
draw away on passing the summit. The guard is replacing the tail-lamp, for 

the reasons described in the accompanying article. 




train's class, while the engine in rear 
(or the leading "banker" should two 

it. 




be used) carries one white 
When a goods train is assisted 



lamp until his train has passed out 
of sight of the signalman at the next 
box, at the same time making every 



in 



rear the 
brake- van 




must remove the 

as soon as the 



endeavour to intimate to the signal- 
man that the assisting engine is still 

in 



th« 




ion. The object of 





comes on, replacing it w 







the assistant 



engine 



drops off. As a 




ions is 





to prevent 





gene 

not i< cive their 

signal-box. 



mu>t 




a banking engine which has left its 
train between boxes, through break- 
down or other cause, from being left 

1 nun 



in 








admitted into that section. 

■ 

At places where banking 



ines 



are ^ 



re~ 




attached or 





s 



special sig 

to control their movements 



are often employ 5 *! 

k * I 



1 




o 






out of the sidings. At certain 
senger termini where passenger trains 

frequently assisted out by the 

__„:_. L_ the 
empty coaches, special signals may 
be seen, located an engine-length or 



engines which have brought in 



two from the buifer stops. These are 
used to indicate that when the train 
starts the rear 



engine 




as 




as a point stipulated 




local instructions; but if the tram is 
ready to leave and the starting sigi 





s 



are off, but not the special 

signal, the rear engine must remain 

behind until the train has left and the 







e 




Incidentally, there are many mis- 



banking 



of 



apprehensions about the 

trains out of some British stations 

s right off 






A freight train battling Its way through rainstorms on the most exposed section of a famous North Country 

incline. The engine is an L.M.S. standard "Class 3" 0-6-OT. 



having very steep gr 
the platform ends, as with the 1 
70 Camden Incline out of Euston. In 
this and other instances the engine 

Which has brought (Continued on paee 106} 



76 



THE MECCANO 




J 









I 



! 



i 



i 









Burni 







ew 



Style i 




an 



Old 




By A. S. Jenkinson 




queer, but 




you think of 

burners you really ought 

think of three quite different 

I am not going to tell you 
about the old-timer with his piled-up 
turves round the smouldering wood; 
he was described last month. Nor 




What did matter apparently 

was that the wood must 

be 

like 



elm, 




is stuff 

-i # ■ ■ ■ 

birch ;md 



resinous pine 



or fir, which make quite a 
different kind of charcoal 









even about the second maker 



i 






rece 



n 




a 



wood 




and give off far more "oily" 

with too much resin, 

other undesirable 




fool-proof methods into charcoal. In 

both these ways, the smoke given off 
escapes 

though 




and 



is was 



ted, 
sorts of most 

valuable and fascinating things. The 

third and most modern maker collects 
that smoke and- 




like 




s 




ft 



said my guide, "It makes a 

lot of people feel quite sick." 

~~ " we walked over 



Toge 





)ut come with me 
to the Forest of Dean, where I've 



to a 
cave 




iron 
the 




seen the plant of a firm that 
does the smoke-catching as well. 
Sometimes, curiously enough, the 

old-timers burn their cru 




From this 



' 'cave' ' 









in 



the 
woods surrounding the firm's factory, 





of yesteryear 




of the 



just like 

only they're still alive! 

Everywhere in the 
factory there was a smell of burning, 
or at 

the far 



there came such an intense 
heat that we could not go 
too near it, and we 

up our hands to 
faces to shield them when we looked 

of blackened wood had 





A general view of the charcoal factory described in this article. 




in. A 



just 




a 



Seme of the <<»<>led 



near 






w 







d. out 








** 




>* 




my guide told me 
real charcoal. It had 



» 




of cooking 



we re 




"cave" 



was 
the 



as w r ood 48 hrs. earlier, and 







and I saw 



were 




f 





had been co 




high with small cut-up tree branches, 



often 

them. 








moss or ivv still 




■ 




tniide told me that this 





n K 



ever since at a 



the 

were let down 





from 
was being unloaded 

pieces of wood 

the uncharred 
ones, except that they had shrunk. 
One large charred log still remained 
in the next cleared truck. I was fold. 

that it was too big to be converted 
into charcoal in the first firing, and 




would have 




g° 



into the oven as 



moss and stuff didn't matter as long load had been put in, thus making many as three times. An easier but 

of converting 



as there wasn't too much of it. 



the "cave" into a giga 







more expensive 

the larger logs into charcoal would be 

to split them before cooking. 

The buildings immediately over the 

ovens were devoted to the refining 

of the gases from the charcoal. To 

get 





dim 




an iron 












saw a 







in 




ing 



sight 



pipes leading from the top of the 

ovens to giant water-cooled con 
densers where the fumes 




i I 
two of the 




saw 



1 i q uid 





OITL 




the first front 
wood had only 



an oven where 

just been put in, and the second 
from practically "cooked" wood. The 
liquid from the process just started 
was light -brownish in colour and was 
fairly gushing out. From the 

wood the flow was much smaller and 
was sticky stuff, very nearly the 
colour of creosote. 

That brownish stuff is made up 




♦« 



of water, 




wood alcohol and 



The retorts above the stoking grates. The fumes from the charcoal ovens yield valuable chemicals, including 

wood alcohol and naphtha. 



naphtha," my guide told me. 
come and see where we s 



« 




Now 

and 












MECCANO 







AZ1NE 









77 



refine it. Even if I myself under- 

all the processes explained to 
me, it would be no use telling anyone 




who wasn't 

chemistry. 




But 



acquainted with 

the 





liquid I had just seen is mixed with 

^ 

lime. This fixes the acetic acid, which 

m 



im m ediately com bin es 




the lime, 



while the wood alcohol, naphtha and 
water are then distilled off from the 

on 
ng points are 

different. The wood alcohol forms 
about one-third of the whole solution. 




the fact 







I was told that the acetate of lime 





produced was used in 

.a. 

facture of artificial silk and that the 

to dilute methy- 




wa s 




: 





d spirits 



lated spirits, 

you see, 
is a white, sweetish ana expensive 

liquid that tastes quite nice/' 



guide. 
then 



S 



o 








first colour 





naphtha to it to make it 
nasty to taste, so that people won't 



injure themselves by drinking it," 
I was told many other interesting 

the processes, but even 





believe 



found it 





ost impossible to 
the clear coloi 1 rless 



valuable material. 



made from coconut shells, 






itself is a form of 
carbon and, despite its 



a 



Our w 








- 



«* 



We 



is all En 

it from 






Loading a wood car with forest waste to be converted into charcoal 



roastin g 

nse 



will 




with 



a 




of Worcester, 1 le 








i 



and almost without 






. 



smoke. I asked w 













s 



war 




rt. 






volatile naphtha which I saw had 

come from the dirtv black wood I 



had seen below. And I don't think masks, since it is charcoal that you imported large quantities of charcoal 

*- . .—.--. ■ » ■ # Jfc * -■* » . * + J** '*-*. * « "TV • - 1 II 



ier any o 

used in 



the 





is used mainly in 

ening steel to help Britain in her 



Before 



the 



war 



we 




old-timers, when they saw the 



black smoke coming from their turf 
covered heaps, would have believed 
that they were realty wasting so much 




will find in the purifying filters of 
lese. But I was told that this is not 

the most suitable charcoal, and that 
nearly all the gas mask material is 



from Germany, Belgium, Poland and 
France, but this of course was stop- 





, so you can see 
this industry now is to Britain. 













\\ 



Tai 





le 



// 




les 



Over 




Rain 




ow 



By an Air Gunner 









time. 



H were on our way back from the 

Ruhr where we had a pretty rough 

Somehow or other we had lost 



ourselves among clouds — clouds which 
seemed to reach right down to the ground. 
The wireless man let off a flare when the 
observer judged that we were more or 
over the target, and we followed its red 

glow down and down, but still could not 
see whore we were. 




Then we 




into a hailstorm, 




engine intakes iced up, and just for one 

horrible moment both engines cut. By the 

there were 

us. 

" Lightning" said someone. But it wasn't 



time they had started again 

flickers and flashes all round 



lightning 




time, as we 




w 




a 







heavy 'Archie' went "whoof/ not far 
from my turret, The Huns down below 
could not see us, but they had got their 




ictors 




wing us 




m 




t 



and 




soon the cloud that we sailed through was 

lit by a bright golden glow, as 20 or 30 
searchlights tried to pierce through to 

us. 
For the next 20 minutes we cruised 

about, dodging 

and *Flak' bursting 

came into free air from a lower layer 





diving, with 
all round. Then we 




cloud with another 




r up above us. 



The 




seemed to have stopped, and 



the searchlights had disappeared, except 






two which trailed along on our tail, one on 

either side of my turret. 



I reported 






to the captain, 

i 

Gunner!" his answer 
came back. "I've just seen a fighter come 

■■1* 

up on the port bow. 

the 





is i> 

larlie" 




waits. For e 




«■ 



Tail 




hours or more 
he sits in the dark or in the garish brilliance 



of searchlights, 




with his thoughts 



and his guns. Without playing any part in 

it he hears all that goes on in front — the 
ing of 'fixes/ the dropping of flares 
and of bombs. But when fighters appear 




on the scene that is "Tail End Charlie's" 
big moment. Only he can deal with them. 

my t u rre t , urgen 1 1 y 

Then . 



we 



I swung round 
searching the sky, 
flew into cloud. The excitement was over. 

. and one 



once more, 



* 







we were very 
getting back home. The east was saffron 
as we passed over the Dutch coast, where 
I fired a short burst at a pair of inquisitive 



searchlights 
turret. 



that clung stolidly 

Long before we had 







mv 
the 



coast the sky was lit up by the sun, the 

clouds were breaking and pale pink cumulus 



floated high up in the blue. 

Low on our beam a little dark cloud 

drifted along, spilling rain down on the 

sea. A shimmering rainbow arched between 



vapour 



and 





sun was rising 







were nearly home and I gave a 



shout of delight. 



"Just look 




■ « 



I 




the lovely rain — Look 
"Unidentified aircraft 






up fast on starboard 

Out of the sun, 



coming 




t r 



swift and sinister and 

towards us, sped a long dark- 

ced 



swooping 

bodied aircraft, its twin tail rudders 








i above " the thin win 




A. Messer- 

schmitt "Me. 110," one of the famous 
dawn patrol," waiting for tardy home- 

I centred it well in my sights. 



comers 



Six hundred yards . . . four hundred yards. 

fingers closed on the triggers. 




- 



Suddenly, 




the 




unexpec 
swung to one side. 

. With a 






strange 
w rings 




aire 

showed on the 

realised that I had been on the point of 

shooting down one of our Coastal Command 
aircraft, a Lockheed "Hudson." 

As the captain said when we got home . . 
Serve him right if you had! Trying to 
scare us like that." 

"Tail End Charlie" agreed 



i * 






78 



THE MECCANO 




Repairing 




IDS 




Electric Welding 








Neat Tender in Service on 





River Thames 



shaft, and two 
leads are attached to the large wine- 
nuts that form the main terrains 
of the tender. One lead is connected 
to the hull of the ship to serve as an 

for the cur- 



By T. R. Robinson 



earth" or return 
rent, and the other is 








to 











LECTKICAL 



welding 



is a ver\ 



i 



valuable method of obtaining an 

extended period of service from 
damaged or worn parts of the hulls 
and machinery of si dps. The chief 



output at 75 v. is 200 amp. 

The clutch lever and the throttle 

il of the engine 














e 





cultv met with in its use is that 
many of the parts needing this kind 
of repair are so heavy and awkward 



engine room, and are 

close beside the wheel, so that one 
man can easily handle the tender 
and make the necessary adjustments 



welding tool used by the repairer. 

As soon as this has been done, the 
engine speed is adjusted and 
control panel set. Welding can then 

be proceeded with. Only a minimum 

of supervision is need 




jeo by the en- 
gine and dynamo, which are able to 



run for 



ru 








a position 




lie is in 




to handle that the cost of removing control of the movements of 
them to the welding-shop, and of 
replacing them afterwards, is often 
greater than that of the ac 

overcome tin" 





e 





ion 



without inter- 

the plant 

ion 







hrs. in order to complete an 



A rat J ler 





poi 




in the 






of the drive shafts is that 









* T i" 1 "I * 

kinds of welded repairs have 

been carried out with the "Wolf's" 






sometimes 
lighter, which is 




en en 



ed 





;> and moored there, so 



the 

that the welding can be carried out 
with a minimum of dismantling 
work. This, does save cons 
time, 
makeshift method. 

enable such work to be dealt 





to some extent is still a 




more rapid lv and efficiently, 
Harland and Wolff Ltd. have fitted 
out a neat welding tender, named the 



4* 




W 







serves as a 




equipment in the London 
area. The tender is a small but 
sturdy craft, weighing only 11 tons 
and having a hull of galvanised steel 



eon st ruction 



Its 





a 
12/24 h.p. Morris Navigator engine, 

fitted with magneto ignition, which 
serves 




to 



d ri ve 



to propel the craft and 



the 




for welt 



nioun 





mamo supplying 



This 



amidships, 




engine is 
is fitted 



with a particularly ingenious dual 



drive 

■ 

very 



1 




t mounted in 

available. 




The 

engine is located forward in the 
engine-room, and behind it are two 
shafts placed vertically one above the 




er one 



com 





con 




dynamo and the lower carrying the 
driving member of a dog-clutch 
used to engage it with the propeller 
shaft when necessary. 




control 





panel, 

switches and control for 
the regulation of voltage and current 





is mounted 




the 



dynamo, and lockers for the storage 
of welding equipment, tools and 

sides 

_ __ — 

and at the forward end of the 

engine-room. The 



su 




ies are fitted 





of 
the dynamo is 1,440 r.p.ni., and the 





The "Wolf 



■ P 



tied 








side a dredger while engaged on repairs to the buckets* Photograph by courtesy 

of Harland and Wolff Ltd,. London, 



the dynamo is never disconnected 
from the drive. It therefore revolves 

being used 






idlv when 






t o propel 




*nai, 

the controls. 




equipment, but one of the most 
interesting 




e 







tlii 



is provided 




s is 



in 



similar 



s 









work 



is 



buckets 



s 



and 









The current for 





is 




, after 

through the control panel, 

to two main terminals on the 



K 



rear engine-room 




and to 



redgers that aiv 
ect to heavy wear. The Thames 

dredgers often receive repairs from 
the welding plant of the "Wolf," for 
this equipment enables the buckets 
to be reconditioned without removal 
from the chain, and the time that 
the dredger is out of sendee is con 



reduced. 



these are connected the leads passing 
to the point of repair. 

When a ship needing repair arrives emergency, it is even pc 
in the Thames, the damaged or worn 




In 




o 









weldin 



parts 



are 






an 



expert, and if it is decided that the 



welding tender is to be used for the 



dredger at 



(V 




r the 
to go to the 

the point where it is 

operating, and by so doing to save 



m 









her 






way to the 




iiours of time in 




the 



w 




e 



the ship is moored and 
ties up alongside. Then the clutch 

ed to disengage the engine 



is o 




craft back to work. 
The "Wolf" is able to travel over 

a wide area, and has even gone as 
I ar as Sea Reach to carry out repairs. 





MECCANO MAGAZINE 



79 









oun 




<fe 



THE splendidly realistic cover of 
* _ * #* _ i t it r _ _ _ _ m +. __« M _ 




-L issue of the 





azine show- 



ing a L.M.S. train leaving an important 
terminus, will appeal to all our readers 
who are railway enthusiasts ami especially 



below the limit set by the reducing valve, 
a supplementarv supply of steam from the 



ment was retained irt all the subsequ 




built 



un 




b 



*■> 




r was introduced. The maximum 




Smith 



to those who 




-our the 




of 




our jo 
shown, No. 




iway company. The engine 
1007, is a typically Midland 

type, for it is one of the well-known 

Deeley Compounds, developed on the Mid- 



pressure n I lowed in the low-pressure steam 
chest could not be exceeded, however. 



In addition, if the pressure in the high- 



pressure cylinder was below that of the 





receiver or st cam-chest, steam co 

to either side of the high-pressure piston 

means of non-return valves. Corn- 




Compounds, including those 
the L.JM.S- engine. The 

Compounds also were altered 
modi lied system introduced 

To the 1905 engines were 
1010-1029 in 1906, No*. 1(135-1039 in 

and Nos. 1040-1044 in 1909; no more 
engines of the U^pe were built unlil 1924. 
In the meantime the provision of super 






s 



ystem, from which the numerous 
Standard Compounds of the L.M.S. have 

been evolved. 

The Midland Compounds are extremely 

lonji-liv^a 1-h mi, olives, the original design 

back to the early years of this 

It i^ remarkable too that onlv 

these engines were in service in 

Midland days, and none of these'.': 



the 



pring of the reducing heating apparatus had provided a further 

mient of the general 



pression of _ _ 

valve by the driver increased the pressure 

of steam passing to the low-pressure 




in 



the 





in 




cylinders. Further compression resu 

the admission of live steam to the low- 

■ I ■!'■_■ 

pressure cylinders, while the high-pressure 
piston was placed in equilibrium by tin 

admission of steam on either side of it. 



design, and it was as a superheated engine, 
but with slightly reduced driving wheel 
that it became standard on the L.M.S. 



s 






In the numbers given above it wilt be 

that there is apparently a blank 
No. 1029 and No. 1035. Ac 

■ 





had 




built more rece n 




than 1909. With the formation 



of the I., MS, the type, with 

slight modifications, was adopted 

as a standard, 




the whole 
family of Compounds now totals 

engires, their numbers run- 

1000-1199 and from 





ning 
900-939. 



Although the Compounds have 



been familiar 




-t 



i 



St. 



Pancras for many years past they 
were originally designed for duty 



on the 



di 




Leeds 




■ . 

Carlisle section of the Midland, 



which at Aisgill a 




s a height 



of 1.167 ft. The first two engines 



we re 








service in 1902 



r 



and worked between Leeds and 







Carlisle. These were Midland Nos. L.M.S. No. 1000, the first 
263 1 



. 



and 2632. Three more 

r engines, Nos. 2633, 2634 and 2B3S- 
followed in 1903. 



Midland Compound showing 

courtesy of Ihe L.M.S. In its earlier 



the final development of the design before grouping. Photograph by 

davs it was No. 2631. 




but these were 




The live 
Midland were 




Compounds 

successful 




in the re-numbering that took place on the 



Midland in 




/ 




Ten St. Pancras, Nottingham and 



1 )e rby . 



In each of t 












es 



the 



original "Smith" system >f compounding, 



which had been dev 




and applied 



ex- 



perimentally on the North Eastern Railway, 
was employed. This involved three -cylinder 



propulsion, 



one 



high-pressure 




were good starters, they accelerated quickly 
and could attain, for those days, quite 
high speeds. No. 2632 in fact was timed at 
91.8 m.p.h, over two successive miles with 
240 tons behind the tender. However. 
when at Derby Mr. R. M. Deeley succeeded 
Mr. S. W. Johnson, under whom the 
original 



b 



the original Nos, 2631-4 



ccame Nos. 1000-1004, the earlier 




engines Nos. 1000-1029 becoming Nos. 
1005-1034. 

In 
were 



th 



appearance tne Deeley engines 
totally different from those of John- 




son. The cab, splashers and 
ook on the typical appearance with 




being placed between the frames and two 



low-pressure cylinders outside them; both 

on the North Eastern experimental engine 

and on the Midland ones all three-cylinders 

were connected to the leading coupled 
axle of a 4-4-0 type engine. The high- 
cylinder was connected to the 

crank axle and the low-pressure 
cylinders drove on to the crank pins of 



ign had been worked out, he 



decided to simplify* to some extent the 
main details of the Smith system. So in 



which we are all so 





the 



well-known flat-sided tender running on 

* 

-wheels replaced the double - bogie 




the new Deeley Compounds, Nos. 1000- 

1009 of 1905, the reducing valve arrange- 
ment was done away with and a special 
n of regulator valve substituted for it. 



wate r 




i ■ 



then favoured for the 








This had tliree steam ports, one of them 

low-pressure 




conn 





the 



the leading coupled w 

starting 




s. 





not 




a strong 




feature of previous compound systems 

it was provided by the Smith arrange- 
ment, in which boiler steam was admitted 
to all three cylinders at starting. Admission 





in 






to the high-pressure unit was direct, but 

case of the low-pressure units 
had to pass through a reducing 
valve. This valve, which could be operated 
from the cab, was situated on the side of 

the smoke-box. After the first exhaust 
from the high- pressure cylinder the supply 



cylinders by means of a small auxiliary 
steam pipe. The main regulator valve had 
a small "Jockey valve" on the back of 

when the regulator handle was 

the driver at starting 

ually uncovered two of 
one of them bring that leading 
auxiliary pipe. Thus steam was admitted 
to all three cylinders, but as the non- 
return valve arrangement was retain 
the high-pressure cvlinder the high-pressure 



bigger engines. 

Grouping produced further modifications 

in detail and in external appearance, 
although the earliest L.M.S. Compounds 
Nos, 1 .045-1U64 exactly resembled externally 
theM id land engines as superheated arid fitted 
with extended smoke-boxes. 






With the multiplication of the type and 

the extension of its activities the engines 



built from No. 10(55 onwards were provided 






chimnevs 

with the 




on 



with 

to conform 

loading gauge. Then from No. 

the right-hand 

from 




do 



f lines 



Division 






10 85 onward 



drive that 





to conform 




been re- 
was altered 

■ 

standard left-hand 








ma 



low-pressure ones 

and exhaust 






of boiler 
was cut 
steam from the high-pressure cylinder took 

its place, so ihat compound working came 
into operation. To ensure that the power 
output of the low-pressure units should 
be maintained, however, in case the 

pressure of the high-pressure exhaust 



piston was maintained in 

steam on each side of it, 

Thus the Deeley Compounds, on 
starting, worked as two-cylinder simple 

with the low-pressure cylinder: 

the regulator handle 




• — * - 

nsition for the driver adopted on the 
^.M.S, Under the Stanier regime new 



standard 




m 









have 






engines, 

the 



some 

■ 

So 



imneys 
of the Compounds. 

the Compounds are 




fitted to 



now found at 




work. 




was moved 

auxiliary port was 

direct I v to 




over, 

ed 

the 



vcr 









in ad- 
ess u re 



ng was 




cvlinder only and compound 

then brought into operation. This arrange 



points as far afield as Aberdeen and Bristol. 

Although ousted from the principal duties 
by the Stanier six-coupled classes they still 
appear on trains of suitable weight and no 
doubt will continue to do so for some 

time yet. 



80 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 
















screen , which was about 




in. thick. He 



Bombers Outwit Italian Fighters 






During occasional lulls in the operations 

in the Western Desert Royal Air Force 

pilots there have been able to describe 



some of their experiences. 

The following story of an exciting chase 
in which one of our bomber formations 
raiding Bardia outwitted a strong force of 

Italian fighters in a 140-mile race for home 
was told recently by the leader of the 

formation. 

As the R.A.F. bombers approached their 
objective they found themselves 

60 m.p.h. wind. Near the target , 

spotted Italian fighters 2,000 (t. below 




t h e m 



climbing 




to attack. There 








was a certain amount of anti-aircraft fire, 

ling serious, and in spite of the 
enemy aircraft so near at hand, the 
bombers carried on with their raid. 

"My flight released their bombs in one 
salvo," said the Squadron Leader. "All the 
time the fighters were drawing closer to us 
but we managed to take a couple of ciuick 



I 



photographs of our bombs bursting on 



the 




It was then time to make 



tracks for our base, and we turned out to 



sea. We knew that we 




be 




but with the wind behind us we streaked 

along at a grand pace; B< >u» ■ <\ the fighters 

gave up the chase, but two of them hung 
on and kept blazing awav at us. We made 

for a cloud at 4,000 ft., and whistled into 

a turn under its cover. The enemv 

lost us for the time being and, with more 




cloud to 



danc 




* 



e. 



At last 







too. They had followed 




we 




we led them a merry 

give up 
140 miles, 




carried out the bombing on 
whieh we set forth and had got away all 




Kht 



a large force of fighters. 

that returning against the 
strong wind over the Mediterranean, they 




had difficulty in getting home — thev must 



have been ru 



nmng low in petrol, and they 



When 



had a long jaunt back to Libya 

they made off we re-formed and came back 



to our base in comfortable style 






been a real I \ 




morning. 



It had 

I* 



Civil Aviation Honours 






The New Year Honours List this 

_ _ 'i 



ear 
elly 



included the names of Capt 

Rogers, whose portrait was reproduced 

page 453 of the October 1940 "M.M." and 



Section Eng 




H all id a v, both 

■ 



members of the staff of British A in* 

Capt. Kellv Rogers has been awarded 
the O.B.E. In command of the riving boat 
"Clare" he led the British Airways trans- 

and 



atlantic flights during the 
autumn of 1940, When the 

*' Corsair" 



in tl 



came down 



summer 



g 









a narrow river 



tan 











1939 



she was badly damaged. Capt, Kelly Rogers 



was sent out to attend to the salvage 
operations, and after II) months of hard 

work and brilliant improvisation he brought 

the flying boat home, and she is now 
operating on the Empire routes of British 



Airways. In the sal 
prohablv 



of 



Corsair," 



bored a hole with a red hot poker, then 
carved the hole to fit the pilot's finger. 

The pilot, who was awarded the D.S.O. 
soon after shooting down the Nazi machine, 
has had "600th" carved on the inside of 
the ring. 






vagmg 

most remarkable operation 
of its kind in the history of flying. Captain 

was assisted "by Engineer 
George Halliday, who has been awarded 

if 

the M. BE. 

Halliday is one of the pioneer engineers 

of the Empire air routes. Shortly after his 
work on "Corsair 4 * he was sent to Karachi 

i 

to take dyer that section of one of these 
routes, and he is now Assistant Service 

ineer. Overseas Services, at British 



'Guba" Now Used by British Airways 

It is now known that the Consolidated 

last year by 




boat "Cuba 



bought 





headquarters in Durban. He is 

a native of Dumfries, and a typical ex- 

ample of the men who have made Scotch 
engineers famous throughout the world. 



Ministry of Aircraft Production has 

been employed on British Airways service 

to Lisbon, transporting air mails and 

freight between that port and England. 

Lisbon is well-known as the eastern 

terminus of I 'an American Airuavs" Iran-- 

■ J 

atlantic service. The Boeiag "'Clipper" 
(lying boats making the ocean crossing 
have been equipped with additional fuel 




to carry an 




1,200 gall, of 



petrol, s*> that the aircraft can fly to 
Lisbon either by the Bermuda route or 




Weslland "Lysanaer" Army co-operation monoplanes Hying in formation. Photograph by courtesy of "Flight.' 






R.A.F. Fighter Markings 
A further change has been made in the 



direct from the United States 



* 



* 



* 



* 



camouflage of aircraft of the Roy 
Force Fighter Command, by the rever 
to a black finish for the underside of 



A 




wing. The finish of the 
g remains light blue. 

The 600th Victory . 






hi tard 



American Airlines have been 
license by the Mexican 
Communications to ■ >perate an air passenger 

service between the United 







A transparent signet ring made from the 
windscreen of a Messerschmitt "**- ,nn " 



Monterrey, and Mexico City. One 
ition of the permit is that Mexican 
ground staffs must be employed at the call 
points situated in that country. 



Me 
ii 




* 



* 



* 



* 



is now worn by the R.A.F. "Spitfire 
who helped to 





ot 



fighter, and in 
station's "bas" to 600. 

near 



The 



■n a German 



his 

109" 






. The flight sergeant 
on maintenance, who is a skilled 
handicraft worker, cut a piece an inch 
square from the Messerschmitt *s wind- 



A German pilot taken prisoner in Kent 
said that while flying at 25,000 ft., he had 
been "attacked in the rear" by his rubber 

which had become 
inflated. In an effort to master the dinghy 
he lost control of his 

1 . 






and 



w 




into a spiral dive. On pulling out, the 
engine stalled, and he had to land. 






MECCANO MAGAZINE 



81 






* 



* 







New Bomber for the Royal Air 

The upper photograph on this page 



crosses on 



the f 



use 





the Blackburn 




I General 



Reconnaissance and Torpedo Bomber, an- 
other of the line new types of British 

aircraft now going into service with the 
Royal Air Force. 
formanen of this 

■ 



and wings. That 
was enough for the sergeant. He wheeled 
round and attacked them, and 
a long burst he saw pieces falling 
from one of them. The sertr 






available. 



of the per- 
isting machine are 




The "Botha" I is a high wing monoplane 



30() yds,, and the enemy machine 



away in a spin. It was later confirmed as 

d est roved. 

In the afternoon a Flight Lieutenant of 
the same squadron, after dealing with an 

Me. 109," fired at another Chance Vought, 



•t 




The Blackburn 



"Botha" I General Reconnaissance and Torpedo Bomber, a One British machine now going into 
service with the Royal Air Force. Photograph by courtesy of Blackburn Aircraft Ltd, 



of 59 ft. span, with twin "Bristol" Perseus 

in the leading edge of the 



XA 



engines 



• i 




M 



wing. The detachable rear portions of the 



engine 



nacelles are mounted below the 



wing centre section and carry 




undcr- 



and he considers it probablv destroyed, 

About a month later a Curtiss 
was engaged over the channel by a pilot 
of another 

"American'* 




sq u ad ro n . 



The 



carriage units when these are retracted. 
The main fuel and oil tanks also are in the 



Nazi 




British 



fighter staggered away, the 

having lost control. 

that 




fighter 






wing centre section. 

The long-nosed fuselage has an enclosed 

cabin for the crew of four, who consist of 

a p 

aimer, a wireless operator, and a gunner. 

The pilot's seat is at the port side of the 

* _^ _■_■ _..■*■ __ _- _ 

forward 



American fighters are now available to us. 
Somehow it went against the grain to 



i 




a navigator who also acts as bomb 



shoot 

it 



them down, but when 




were on 



the "other side" it was a job that had to 
be done. 







of 





and the bomb 



aimer's prone position is to the starboard 
side. A gangway extends along the star- 
board side and 



■ 

Success of Australia-New Zealand 

Service 








int er-comm u n i ca- 
tion between forward and rear positions. 

There is a power-operated multi-gun 

turret mounted on the upper side of the 



The new air link of Empire between 
Australia and New Zealand across the 

1 ,340 miles of the Tasman Sea is now 

months 





to the rear of the wing 




ing 



firmly established. In the first 

of operation the two flying boats "Aotearoa" 

and "Awarua" of Tasman Airways made 



a position that gives a wide field of 
lire. Access to this turret is gained from 
the rear of the cabin. 

When the Germans Used American Fighters 

Against Us 



from Durban to Sydney, and the starting 



of the Pan American service 




San 



Francisco to Auckland. It is likely that 
the trans-Tasman crossings will be further 
increased to two services a week each way. 
The flights have been made with re- 
markable regularity. Weather conditions 



over the Tasman Sea are notoriously un- 
reliable, and many people declared that it 

J 1 

would be impossible to keep to a proper 

ser v ices ha ve 

the 



timetable 



Meteorological 




been so improved, however, 

performance* of thr I British Hying bonis ;- 

so satisfactory, that a regularity figure of 
97.6 per cent, has been achieved. 

The Late Captain Horsey: A Fine Civil Pilot 



British civil aviation has lost a fine 

airman by the death on active service of 

a 

. Horsey, a founder pilot of 






one 




the best 




both 





Empire 



air 



Capt. II, 
Imperial 
known figures 

service and 

the war. 

Capt. Horsey had been seconded to Air 
Transport Auxiliary, the organisation that 



to the Continent before 



ferries 




aircraft from 



squadron. On the 





to 



January last he was 



duty pilot at his Jerry Pool. Normally the 



duty 




r i 



t is not expected to fly, but as all 



other available pilots were extremely busy 
that day and the delivery of a certain new 

of aeroplane was urgent, he vol un- 
it up, although the weather 







was bad. On the way the machine developed 
engine trouble, and in making a sudden 
forced landing on bad ground he eras 
and was seriously injured. He died shortly 
afterwards. 

If Capt. Horsey had lived to the end of 
this year he would have completed 25 

years as a pilot, as it was in 1916 that he 
qualified with the Royal Naval Air Service. 
His work for Imperial Airways was mainly 
on European routes, but periodically until 
1936 he operated 




Mediterranean 




ing boats across 
on the route 



the 







Cairo to Khartoum, For a year or so he 
was on land planes in India and Africa 




had flown about 1,690,000 miles without a 
... ent and without injury to a 

single passenger in machines he piloted. 
At one time lie was assistant Flying 
Instructor on la,nd planes at the Imperial 



• 



Pilots of a "Spitfire" squadron of the 
R.A.F. Fighter Command were 
interested in the recent news that American 
aircraft flown by British naval pilots ha 





brought down a German raider. It brought 
back memories of fights they had last 
summer — with American-built machines as 

■ 

their opponents. 

The booty taken by the Germans when 
France capitulated included a number of 

were 
"156 





Chance Vought 

others Curtiss "Hawk* 



lean aircraft, some of \v 

" dive-bombers, and 

fighters. Both types 
numbers by the Germans 
in their big raids on shipping in the 

English Channel, but in their handling of 

them the Nazi "owners" did them less 



were used in 




t 



than ju 






Voughts were first 



sighted 






one 



A Douglas DC-3 of United Air Lines, U.S.A. t in flight over New York City with one "Twin Wasp" engine stopped. 



July morning by a sergeant pilot, He was 
attacking a Mcsserschmitt "Me. 109" when 

he saw three aircraft about 2,00(1 ft, below 

They looked, he said, like 1> lack burn 
but they were silver underneath, 

darker on top, and had black 





45 trips and flew a total of 60.300 miles. 
At first one ilif<h t a week in each direction 
was made, but already the service 

been increased to three flights a fortnight 
in each direction, on account of the doubling 
of British Airways' "horseshoe" service 



Airways school. 
In the 




war 






great pride in the fact that his own active 

service was supplemented by that of his 
I8£ year old son Michael, a pilot officer 
in the R.A.F, 



82 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 




TO 






READ 



u An A.B.C, of Model Aircraft Construction" 

By C S. Kushhkookk, (I J rtre $/- net) 






t'Solid Scale Model Aircraft" 



With 



Here we review books of ifticrest and of me to readers of the "M.MJ* 
the exception of those issued by the Scientific and Children* & Book Clubs, which 
are available only to memhers, we cun supply copies of these books to readers 
win i.tnnot oh tain them through the usual channels. Order from Book Deft. . 
Meccano Limited, Ilinns Road, Liverpool 13. adding 1 - for postage to the price. 

on different books varies, but any halance remaining mil he refunded. 



liv L IL Elwbll. (Mar borough Publishing Co. Ltd. Prwe 3/- iuuj 

The great interest now taken in aviation is reflected in the rapid 
growth of the model aero plan-' hobby and the steady output of 

the model aircraft builder. These two 





books designed to 

additions to the well-known series of such books published by the 

■ 

Harborough company largely break new ground. 



i»r» 



Geology by the 



By L O. Evans, (Murl 




There are many secrets 




en in the l-'arth on which we live. 



and it is fascinatim. to read some of these when told in the pleasant 

and easy style of the author of this attractive book. Fine s< enerv 
always excites our admiration, and here we can learn why 
some parts of the country are attractive because of their 

rounded hills, while others are ait by deep and 

gloomy valleys or marked by rocky masses often, fancifully 



The first, "An A. B.C. of Model Aircraft Construction," is, as the 



title indicates, intended for the beginner in the hoi 'by, and deals 
mainly with essential constructional and designing information. 
The author is an authority '>n his subject, and has achieved con- 
siderable success in model aircraft competitions and an enviable 

reputation for high, quality workmanship in his models. There are 
many interesting diagrams to amplify the text, and some attractive 








i 



shaped. The secrets of all 




and of 





uninteresting flat lands, are to be found in the formations 
below the surface and in the never-ceasing changes these 



undergo 



- 



The author makes the meaning of Earth lore 




to us 



by showing how 




smallest details that we can observe 



during a journey over the hills, along the course of a stream 
or by the coast, have been decided bv the rocks, Then 

comes the storv of the effect of wi 




sunshine; and we are 

ves, 







rain, frost and 

how rivers cut channels for 

bends, create waterfalls 




and even steal headwaters of other streams to make them- 

Helves bigger. The seashore gives us more interesting details, 
and we read of lands that have risen above the sea p carrying 



with them to 




unhelievii ble 




the shells <»f 



« reat vines that lived in the sea mi] lions of years ago. The 



part 
lava 



by fire in creating such rocks as granite and 
explained, and we learn something of the fossils 




that provide us with a timetable for so many rocks 
help to explain for us how they were formed 







Hi 



e 



book 




n$ 




with useful hints on the best way of 

- 



of Earth lore for ones 




and 



a short 




but useful section by Professor G. W. Robinson explainin 

how soils have been formed and how they vary according 

to the 

full-page plates and manv useful explanatory drawings in 

the text. 




on which they are produced. There are eight 










. 



Contorted rock beds at Lul worth Cove, Dorset. This illustration and the one below are from 

"Geology by the Wayside/* reviewed on this page. 



14 



1 1 



British, German and Italian Aircraft 

(Hutchinson, 2/6 n*t) 



Air warfare this year is expected to be on a greater scale than 




mg young 




aire 




builders eng 




m 



ever before and it is advisable that everybody should be able to 

recognise our own and enemy military aircraft immediately they 
are seen, 





iliantv with the appearance of these machines can 
be gained by examining pictures of them and learning t<- recognise 



photographs 

their hobbv. Finally there is a selection of typical model aircraft 

suitable for the beginner in v:u kle, with plans and instructions in 

respect of each machine; and a very useful list of model 
aeronautical 

Flving and non-flying models are two distinct branches of the 

hobby. "Solid Scale Model Aircraft** deals with the construction 

of non -flying models. After discussing the merits of this type of 

miniature aircraft the author deals with the tools required by 

the enthusiast, the most suitable size or scale of model and the 



* 




to 




Th 



-41 



■ 



stage by 




he 




how the 



< 





1_T , K.J 

actual construction of the "solid" model should be carried out, 
supplementing his non -technical instruction with many sectional 

drawings, notable for their simplicity. When the model is 

finished and 

an appropriate setting for photographing the machine, and 
gives some very sensible advice on the actual taking of the 
picture. The final chapter tells how to build scale "solids" 

R.A.F. fighters, the •'Defiant/' "Spitltre." and 




e tells how to make -suitable scenery as 






"Hurricane,'* 

The many half-tone photographs of other non -flying models 
in the book should prove an added incentive to the reader to 

achieve similar skill 




accuracy in 







own 









"The R.A.F. in Action" 

and G. Blaok. 7/6 det) 




Everybody wlio has been thrilled by the e 




*i 



>f the Royal 



A perched block at Korbcr, in Yorkshire, which has been carried to its present position 

by a glacier. 




provides the necessary material. It 
series of photographs, accompan 




details, for which 

contains a 

MP ■ ■^-r- m mi 

by diagrams and brief explanatory notes, of British, German, and 
Italian aircraft now in service. In both photographs and drawin 
each machine is shown from various angles, and details are given 
of duties, performance and armament, where permissible. 



Air Force, will thoroughly enjoy this record in word and picture 
of the work of that Service during the first year of the present 
war. The book has been produced with the co-operation of the 
Air Ministry, and so has the stamp of authority. The summary 
of the year's achievements of the respective R.A.F. Comm 




s 




thrilling 




graphs illustrate 




and forms a fitting preface to the pictorial 




Jn this section 100 specially selected photo - 

each branch of R.A.F, activity, These pictures 
convey vividly the enthusiasm and skill of the men of the R.A.F. 
A royalty on every copy of the book that is sold is given to the 
Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund. 



i 








THE 




















remainder of the print is being made. Care 

must be exercised to ensure accuracy in 

exactly covering the outline, overlapping 

either way being avoided. 

The paper is now placed in the printing 



frame in contact with negative "B, 



and 



the landscape is printed in un 



ta it 






]S 



of 



the same depth of tone as the figure. The 

print now shows a landscape with a paint- 
covered figure. A little rinsing under the 
cold water 



will quickly remove the 

m 

paint, and then the complete picture is 




Combination Printing 






wor 




re 



manner. 




toning and 



fixing in the 






Y a simple process known as combina- 
tion printing it is easy to produce very 

effective and if desired, amusing photo- 
graphs. For example, the process may be 
used for putting a background to a portrait 

or for placing figures of people or animals 
in a view, while some photographers use 
it to obtain humorous results, such as 

pictures of a small man with a huge head 



or a building in an unusual 
process requires no 



The 
and 



consists of combining two or more negatives 





to make a single 




*> 



on one sheet of 



paper. Two excellent examples of the kind 
of pictures that can be produced in this 




way are the girl blowing bubbles and 
maiden sitting on a toadstool that appear 

on this page. These are the work of 




M. 




Reading 



For the mt 




Simp 




met hod of com- 






bination printing some l\O.I\ and a tube 
of red water-colour paint or any of the 

opaque mixtures sold for blocking out 

the materials required. 

that we have a photo- 




graph 



•1 



ie effect of u, 



hicli 




rather spoiled by the unsightly brick-wall 
background. How much nicer it would 




if we could transplant him into the fore- 
ground of an attractive landscape! If the 

negative of such a scene is available it is 
quite easy to effect the change, and the oper- 
ation needs little skill beyond reasonable 
care and attention to one or two essential 

details, the most important of which is that 

Obviously it would be absurd 
a figure lighted from tin left 
into a view lighted from the right, so care 
must be taken to see that both the pictures 




are lighted 
direction. 




approximately the same 



Assuming that the negatives 




this 



that all the operations 
have been carried through carefully, there 
should be nothing to indicate that the 



. 







is comm 




on 





test, w 

negative, which I call "A," the landscape 
negative being labelled "B" for identifica- 




icture is otherwise than a straight print 



om one ne 
An 




rve 




way in which two or more 

prints can be combined is by means of the 




+ 



•Blowing Bubbles" — by H« Bastin, Reading* The bubbles were photographed separately as shown on the left 

and then combined with a print of the little girl. 



tion purposes 



Tl 



ie first 






to be done 






to paint out everything 
portrait on "A," a fine-pointed brush being 

used in order to preserve the outline of the 
ure. As soon as the paint is dry an 

ordinary P.O.P, contact print is made, 
which will show the figure against a plain 
white background. 

The next step is to paint over the figure 

on the print so that it is completely 
protected from 







-on 



»t 



or "patchwork" process. This 

for Pro- 





liant 



action w 




the 



is 

ducing amusing effects. In this process the 

parts of the print to be added to another 
are simply cut out and pasted on. The 
combined print is then copied in the camera. 
It is essential that the jomed-up prints 1 >e 
of exactly the saim- tone, and the picture Lo 
be cut up should be printed on thin paper, 
as the edges of the cut-out parts are liable 
to show in the fini 










Another excellent example of combination work by Mr, Bastin. The finished picture of a girl sitting on a toadstool was 




ueed from the two pictures shown on the left of it 



84 



THE MECCANO 





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Blackburn "Roc" two-seater Fighter* showing the gun turret aft of the cabin and the bomb racks under the wings. Photograph by courtesy of "The Aeroplane/* 



Th 








esting 



New 







Fleet Air Arm 



' I 'HE striking successes of the Fleet 



struct ion with a "Bristol"' Perseus 



takes most of the stress set up by the 



L Air Arm against the Italians have XII engine; but it has a Boulton-Paul loading of the aircraft. The crew con 

sists of a pilot and a gunner who also 

J 1 B 



aroused 



portant bran 




in 




1m- 



f our-gun t 






Koyal Navy 
and especially in the types of aircraft 



at 
the rear of the cockpit, instead of the 

four fixed 



one movable rear gun 




it employs. Some of the older types guns of the other machine. 



acts as ob server and wireless operator; 

occupy an enclosed cabin 








have done s 







idly, and among 




new machines the Blackburn "Skua" 
ghter dive-bomber has given con- 
vincing proof of its high efficiency. 



The wings are of stressed skin con- 
struction, and as stowage space in an 



aircrr 













carrier is very 



are arrant 




to fold about 




Tins fine machine was described in 



the 




1940 



hinges on the centre plane. In their 



with a sliding roof section over the 
pilot's cockpit. Access to the rotatable 
gun turret is gained from the rear of 
this cabin. Watertight compartments 
in the fuselage, together with others 
in the wings; ensure buoyancy for a 

period in the 



long 



mm: 1 

Another new 

of 




churn 




aircraft, very 

similar in design 
and construction to 

the " 
"Roc 



Skua/' is the 






illustrated 

on 

two-seater 

was designed and 
equi 
to meet 

of the Fleet Air 
Arm, and it has 
taken part in many 

ons where 
very sturdy 
con st met ion and 
bility have enabled it to do excellent 
work evvn in face of faster machines. 




event 



of 



t he- 



machine having to 
make a forced 
descent into water, 
even if the cockpit 
becomes Hooded. 



As 



in 



the 



* 1 



Skua" 



the tail unit of the 

"Roc" has the 




and rudder 'set 

forward of the 

tail plane and 




The 



a 



Roc 



1 * 






can 




The -i Roc ,f as seen hert is used from aircraft carriers, but it can be fitted with a twin float undercarriage and 

used a* a seaplane from other ships* Photograph by courtesy of Blackburn Aircraft Ltd. 






Like the "Skua/' it is a low 



■ • 

wing 



cantilever monoplane 



of metal con- 






folded position they lie back alongside 
the fuselage with their leading edges 

u p ward . 

The fuselage is a metal monocoque 
structure, a type in which the skin 



be used either 

a land plan e 

aircraft carriers or 
as a seaplane from 
other ships, the wheel and float under- 
carriages for it being interchangeable. 
The wheel undercarriage is a retract- 




one, 




the twin 




under- 



carriage is of normal construction 















85 



■m\ 









Siberian Dredger's 







Journey 



A large llos 




dredger, 




in the 



United States for work in Siberia, had to 

travel two-thirds of the distance around the 
world to reach its destination. It was first 

in parts on 75 flat railway trucks 
in South Milwaukee, where it was con- 
rail to Baltimore. 

to 










stnfcted, and 

From there it went by 

on the Barents Sea, where it was again 

loaded on to railway trucks and taken to 

Irkutsk, in Siberia. From there it was 

transported by wagons, sledges and carts 
over 20(1 miles of mountain trails to 

then down 








Lena River l>v 

J 

barges to the Vitim River, where the load 

boats and canoes 





was transferred to sm 

for a 2.000-mile journey to Bodaibo. 

From that place a narrow gauge railway 

was 

its journey's end. The time occupied by 

this great journey, including the erection 
of the dredge ready for work, was 18 

months. 



to carry it a further II miles to 



A Mob 






Fire Pump 







The lower illustration on this page shows 
a fine mobile fire pump of a type now us 
in large numbers in the A.R.P. fire-fighting 
service. It is manufactured in two sizes 




son Ltd . , N e w a rk- 



by Worthington- 

Trent, and consists of a pumping unit 
driven by a Ford petrol engine, which is 
mounted on a two-wheeler trailer. The 
pump is of the impeller type, and both the 
suction and delivery openings in the casing 
are provided with caps for protection 
when the pump is not in use. The entire 
pump and engine are enclosed in a pressed 

made for 




housing. 



provision 

units. 




easv access to both units. The trailer is 
manufactured by Briggs Motor Bodies 





South Africa's Biggest Ship Repair Job 



The 





^-repairing job ever 
tackled at Capetown docks was under- 
taken recently. It was the result 
collision l>etween the liner ''Ceramic* 

the former 



of a 

and 



i* 



the freighter "Teslbanft," while 

was on voyage to Australia 




31)0 




passengers. Over ^50,000 damage was t 

to I he vessels, the "Ceramic" receiving 
enormous gash in her starboard bow while 



an 



i he 



ti 



Testbanks 



bo 




were crushed and 



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ft 



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AA 



£ ' : * 



br* m * 



m 



bo 




New Arc Melting Furnace for Johannesbur 




l" lie i] 1 u s t r a t in n be! o w shows 




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telescoped 




a length of over 2(1 ft. 



electric furnace installed at the 

of Mines Steel Products Li mi tied, Johannes- 



*j 




where it is used for 



melting 



\s much of the damage to the "Ceramic 
was below water, dry docking was necessary 



to permit permanent repairs to be carried 



steel 
scrap such as wheels, worn-out rock drills 
and steel cables collected from the various 



mines owmd 




th 



e 




>anv 




er 



out. There is no dry dock 




, 



e enou 



take the vessel in South 




rary repairs cou 







so only 



melting, the scrap is poured into billets 



for conversion into now 



1 u c ts . 



m 

be effected. This 



in 




was done by fixing cement boxes inside 



the hull to stop the leaks and 





voyage 



te her 

to continue her 

the case of the f - Testbank, ' ' 

b 




proc 
The furnace was supplied and 
by Birmingham Electric Furnaces 

and is one of the firm's standard rangr of 

Birlec-Leetromelt furnaces. It operates 



Ltd., 



on a supply of 3,600 kVA at 2.0U0 v., a 



nd 






however, a new bow was 
built on the damaged luil 
This meant rebu 

the whole of the ship 
from the break of the fore- 
castle to the hows, the biggest 
job ever done in a South 
African port. Over 200 tons 
of new steel were required 



for the w 





the onlv 



part of the old bow salved 
from the scrap was the stem- 



piece. This is 7-1 ft. long, and 
is made in two sections, one 

50 ft. long and the other 24 

ft. Although several inc 

thick and wei 





many 

tons, this massive steel bar 
was almost tied in knots by 

the force of the collision. It 



was 




* 

111 





a local 
engineering shop and is apw 

■ B 

as new. 

Lloyd's Register Scholarship 
The General Committee of 

Lloyd's Register of Shipping 

ofier a scholarship, valued at 
£100 per annum and tenable 
for three years, to be awarded 
in May, on the results of a 

competitive examination to 
be held bv the Institute of 




Engineers 



The 



scholarship is intended to 



assist 



marine 



engineering 



studeofe tu take a university 

* ■ * • * 




course in 




The age limits for candidates 



An electric arc furnace for melting steel scrap from South African mines. 

Photograph by courtesy of Birmingham Electric Furnaces Ltd. 



are 18 years to 23 years, and the closing date 

for entries is April 8th t "A/..V," readers 

who would like to have further particulars 

should make application to the Secretary, 

The Institute of Marine Engineers, 73 , 
Amersham Road, High Wycombe, Bucks. 



I ins a capacity of 190 cu. ft., which allows 

for a charge of about 8 tons of scrap. The 

i me required to melt a cold charge of scrap 

to a clear bath, with the furnace already 

hot, is approximately 1^ hrs. The melting 
chamber has a large water-cooled door for 

and removing slag, and this is 



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compressed air 



The main feature of the furnace is that 
it is charged from the top by means of a 

bucket provided with a drop bottom. This 
means that the scrap need not be broken 

into small pieces to pass through the door. 

The roof is lifted and swum; aside by 





raulic ram. When it is 




of a 
lowered after charging, it is 
attached to the furnace casing by clamps, 
and the ram is disengaged. 

The furnace is heated by three graphite 

each 1U in. in diameter. These 

of the chamber 




project through the roof 






and are nutomatically moved towards or 






away 




om the 




bath to maintain 







A mobile fire pump of the type referred to on this page. It is a 

to whom we are indebted for our photograph. 



of Worthington-Simpson Ltd., Newark-on-Trent, 



the required power input. 

The mechanism by means of which the 

furnace is tilted for pouring is designed to 
maintain the stream of metal from the 
spout in approximately the same vertical 
line 







that 



the pouring operation, so 
ere is no need to move the ladle. 



86 





MAGAZINE 




Genera 






new 



■ 

Nature's Storehouse 

Most of the important industrial 
chemicals of to-day can be traced back to 

aa 

t 34 raw materials. The three that are 
often used are water, air and coal, 
which are the sources of nylon, 
material from winch textile fibres of sur- 

strcngth and elasticity can be 

built. Then follow sulphur, salt and 

limestone, and a further group of materials 

industrial chemist 

includes petroleum and natural gas. 

It is fortunate that the three materials 



began to eat heartily and to grow corres- 
pondingly as soon as the more congenial 



conditions were introduced. The 



warm 








required by 







most often employed are easy to obtain. 

Coal is plentiful; there are about 550 

of air around our 



million 




ion 





and water is equally abundant. 
The oceans have in them millions of tons 
of water, and Nature very kindly carries 
out a manufacturing process of her own to 



water was circulated in troughs passing 
on the way through jacket heaters, and 

water was added continually. The 
fish were raised for the purpose of stocking 
Quebec streams. 

■ The plan has been so successful that it 
is to be introduced at a new hatchery in 
Canada, so that it will be possible to 

ger fish into the rivers at an earlier 
time than formerly was possible, 

Icing Up as Sun Grows Hotter 

The Sun does not appear to remain 

temperature, or 

slowly cooling. 

Instead there seems to be a regular cycle 





even 




prov 




us with 



. 




water from thorn 



* 




our heat from the Sun, but 



Water evaporating from the surface of the 
oceans is condensed in the upper air into 
clouds, which are then carried by winds 
over lands where the moisture they contain 
falls as rain. Nature also takes the surplus 
water back again, by way of streams and 
rivers, to the gigantic reservoir of the 
oceans, ready to be purified all over again. 




of change, with periods during which the 
Sun is getting 
We 

the strange idea has been suggested that 
as the Sun gets hotter the Earth 

colder. The explanation lies in the fact 

that an increase in the amount of heat 

radiated by the Sun speeds up the evapora- 
tion of water from the oceans, so that 

clouds become more plentiful and rain 
becomes abundant. In the Polar regions 




The Sugar Loaf Mountain, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the summit of which is reached by cable railway. This photograph 

and the lower one on the opposite page are reproduced by courtesy of the Brazilian Consul, Liverpool. 



Warm Water for Fishes 

It seems that fish grow faster in warm 

been discovered in ex- 
out in Quebec, where 

of throe 




This 




the rain falls as snow, and is packed down 
into great sheets of ice, thousands of feet 
in thickness, from which huge glaciers are 



formed. These push outward, and as their 



area 





young salmon put on the 
»r four years in two summers when the 
water in which they lived was 
In these experiments the central 
system for the fish was fitted up 
late winter and early spring months, when 
the young fry normally make practically 

no advance; and it was found that 



ends they bring with them in 








creasingly severe conditions. It is sugges 

that this is what happened in the Ice 
Ages of thousands of years ago, when the 
greater part of northern Europe was 

covered with gigantic glaciers pouring down 



from 




mountains of Scandinavia, and 




glaciers even covered the slopes of moun- 
tains in what are now tropical regions. 



A Flying Submarine 

So far flying submarines, vessels equally 

at home on the surface of the sea and 



below it, as well as in the air, have been 



met with only in story books. Now comes 
a report that a craft of this kind has been 
invented and demonstrated in Japan. 

The hull of the submarine is of the usual 




but on 




side there are four 



bands of steel that are opened out when 

the vessel is to be flown, forming wings 

with a span of 54 ft. to GO ft. At the same 
time two propeller blades are mov 



of slots and 




to form the 




It is said that only six minutes are requi 
for the conversion, after which the vessel 

is capable of taking off and flying like a 
seaplane after gliding a short distance on 
the surface. 

Bacteria that Eat Steel 







on and 




do 




sound t< i be 



palatable foods, but there are living 
creatures that thrive on them. These are 

bacteria of the kind that Jive in an atmos- 
phere containing no oxygen. They feed on 
iron and steel pipes buried underground, 

and are so voracious that they cause rust 
and 



corrosion 




amounting to 
mil lions of pounds a year. Once they have 
taken hold of a pipe its life can be put at 
from seven to ten years only, 

A Wonderful South American Bay 



The 





untain in 









Rio de Janeiro, which is illustrated on this 
page, rises sharply out of the water to a 






height of 1,260 ft., and provides a vantage 
point from which one of the most beautiful 
panoramas in the whole world can be seen. 

There is a story that it was first climbed 
by an English sailor, who made his way 

es by driving iron spikes 

into the hard rock and mounting it with 







their aid. 




anyone can r 





e 



summit of the mountain without difficulty 

by making use of the cable railway that 
reaches to its crest. This makes the ascent 

aa - a a alia a aaa 

in two stages. The first carries passengers 

to the summit of a lower hill, where there 

is a restaurant, with other attractions, and 
a short walk over this hill brings visitors to 



the 



foot of the second 





is 



When the second part of the 
completed the visitor sees on one side the 

Atlantic Ocean and on the other the great 

bay. This provides anchorage of more than 
5o square miles and without taking minor 

irregularities into account its coast line is 

over 60 miles in length; li is surrounded 
by a picturesque cluster of mountains, 
while islands of varying sizes are 

over its Surface. There is a maze of inlets 

and outlets, and the hills are clothed with 










. 



vegetation 



The 




Rio de Janeiro 
itself is on the western shore of the bay. 
its position is a magnificent one, with 

down to the beach, and 



hills 



running 



gardens occupying the low ground between 

the heights. 

The bay derives its name from the fact 
that it was 




seen by a European on 
Its discoverer thought that 

the mouth of a 



1st January. 

he had entered 

river. Its Indian name is Nitherohi, 




which means 
appropriate, 
bay , 



* 



Mi kid 



en water 



This 



is 




the entrance to the 




the 
is only 1,700 yds, wide. 




Sugar 



Loa f 











4 





MECCANO MAGAZINE 









The start of a pleasure trip that cost a railway =£200. T<j allow (he passage ol the launch the track over the 

bridge had to be taken up and relaid twice. Photograph by courtesy of "The Railway Gazette." 



A Costly Motor Launch 

The New York Central Rai 





recently 
found it necessary to take up 240 ft, of 

their main line track and relay it twice, 

to allow a lifting span bridge to be raised 
so that the owner of a motor launch could 
go for a pleasure trip on the Hudson River. 



The Railway Gazette, from a 




Tn 

issue of which this storv is taken, it is said 
that the cost of this work was about / 1 50. 

The scene of this extraordinary event 

-was a creek, running into the Hudson 
River, over which the track is carried by 

the bridge. Until about ei 




years ago 

tugs and barges passed up and down the 
creek on their way to and from a quarry. 
The quarry became exhausted, and as the 




e was no longer opened 





water 



un 



bri 

traffic, ordinary double 

broken at the ends of the span, was laid 

over it. Then the owner of "DotHe," a 
22-ft. motor launch moored in the creek. 

the War Department, which 

controls all navigable waters in the United 
States, to have the bridge opened for him 




twice on a 



- , 





It seems that he 



was exercising a right, for the railroad was 

ordered to make the necessary arrange- 
ments. The track was lifted and the bridge 
raised for him at 10.30 in the morning, 
and the rail then had to be relaid immedi- 



a 




as the 



• t 



Em pit 

i J * 



•£ 



State 



»*. #i 



> 



Mohawk" 






and "Knickerbocker" expresses, three of 
the most famous trains of the New York 

over 

rge and 



Central Railroad, were due to 





the bridge. 



I he 



< ■ n gi n eers 



in 






the gang carrying out the work iiad to 
stand: by in readiness to do the work all 
over again at 1.30 p.m., when the tn. 
launch returned' 

Farms where Snakes are kept 

The Brazilian snake farm illustrated on 

is a world-famous source oi anti- 
toxins for warding off the effects of poison- 
bite. We in this country run 

no risk of this kind, but snakes 

are a menace in many other parts of 
world, such as Central and South America, 
India and even in parts of the United 
States. Not long ago it was stated that 
about 20,000 fatal cases of poisoning from 






the bite of the 




and other sn 




- 



occurred in India every year. In the West 



Indies there 



is 





the canes of the sugar 
-ica there is the 



the dreaded fer de lance 
cover and protection among 

m 

in 






I— - — > 

black man 




a 




other 




a 




snakes, an*l in the 



United States there are rattlesnakes and 





lough these 






are steadilv 





disappearing. 

Poisoning from snake bite is swift 

and the only effective remedy 

is an antitoxin prepared from the venom 
of the snake itself. At the snake farm in 

Paulo and in others established in 

South Africa and elsewhere the snake 
that is to yield its venom is pinned down 
by means of a long stick and is grasped 




firmly behind the head. This infuriates 

the creature, which is then made to bite 
a thin 





over a container 
while the poison sacs are pressed to force 
out as much venom as possible. The venom 
is diluted and treated to yield the inval- 
uable antitoxin, which has to be 
with little delav if it is to be successful. 

As our photograph shows, the snakes 
in such farms are housed in small huts or 
pits on grassy plots surrounded by moats, 
which the snakes themselves cannot cross. 




The men who work among them 




protected by thick boots and 



cloth in" 



and the fearlessness with which 



v 



j 




re among then* 
provides one of the 
visitors. 



dangerous 



they 




charges 
thrills for 



> 



What happens to Salvaged Waste Paper 





u ro pe 

wood 








war sprc; 

so cut 
from which to 



over Northern 




large 




of 



pa I >er 



we have all been saving clean newspapers 



and wrappings for salvage 




of us 



may have wondered exactly what happens 

to the paper collected in this 
It is 







manner, 
different kinds 



are then baled for despatch to the paper 

mills. There it is further graded, and is 

then fed into heaters in which it is broken 
up with water. A proportion of new wood 
pulp is then added and the mixture, some- 
times known as 

the paper m 





is run on to 
. nes. There the water 

flows away and the mass of fibres is left 



matted 
the waste 




form paper. Some of 



is employed in the 

production of cardboard, ami all of it can 
be used again and again if it is kept clean 
and returned for salvage instead of being 
destroyed. 

Screwdriver that picks up its own Screws 

The ordinary screwdriver 

■ 

needs of most of us, and where 
numbers of screws to be driven in, and 

time is all important, it is easy to make 

use of a power screwdriver. This is a 

rtable tool, electrically driven, that turns 






are 






screw 



and 







it 



if 



home" in a 



fraction of the time that would be required 
if an ordinary screwdriver were used. Now 






efficiency of power screwdriving 

increased still further by the 
duction of a tool that first picks up its 

pick-up of this screwdriver 



screw 




has slots cut into it so that it may be said 
to consist of fingers. These are 

pressure on the screw that 
picked up, and a spring then causes them 
to close upon the head of the screw and 






d it 





is 



An important part in this 
played by a special tray that "holds the 



screws. The tray has cut in it a series of 
parallel slots, anil it is mounted on springs 
fixed to a base. The screws to be used are 



>ed on to the tray and on shaking 




they become suspended in the slots 



which thus are 




aced 



by their heads. 

ready to be seized by the sere wd river. 
The gentlest pressure only is heeded. 




A snake farm in Sao Paulo, Brazil, where serums for treating cases of snake-bite are prepared from venom* 



88 



THE 




M AGAZIN E 




Swiss Electric Locomotive Development 

A new 12,000 h.p> double-ended electric 




otive was recentlj 



■ 




to 





Shi-- lederal Railways U*r heavy haula^e 

over the steeply-graded Gotthard route. 

Though more powerful, it is in many ways 
similar to the double giant N". UN51. 

was built in 1931 and lias been in 

■ 

reimlar service between Lucerne and the 
Italian frontier. Each half has 14 wheels* 

and the two halves are always coupled 
together, driving compartments being 
provided at each end. The total weight is 
approximately 244 




Ail "Aircraft" Locomotive at Work 

Several interesting features were a 




ted 
to a recent journey I made from South 



Wales 




London, not 







being 



the 



identity of the engine, No. 5079 "Lysandcr," 



one of the 4-6-0 "Castle" series which 

have lately been renamed after famous 

Fleet Air Arm air- 
which over various 

■ 

sections of the journey ranged from 403 

to 418 tare tons, representing a maximum 

of about 445 tons loaded, "Lysandtr" had 



types ■>( R.A.F. 
craft. With a 




to 




one of the 




through 



engine-workings on the G.W.R., since this 




train, 




Sunday morning ex- 



from Fishguard, follows! during the 
winter months — as was the practice before 

J 




the war — the older rou 




via 




IstOW 



of 2Ur] 



and Gloucester, involving for the engine 

a Swan sea- 1 *a ddiu -ton j o u rney 

miles instead of the normal 191 miles via 

Badminton. 

For the 44£ easily-graded miles along 

the banks of the Severn from Newport to 
Gloucester, the public timetable generously 

allows 70 min., and over this attractively 
scenic course "Lvstnider" won back most 






of a late start from Newport by virtue of 
a gross time of 62 J ruin.; allowing for two 
permanent way slacks, one very severe, 

a signal check, the net time for the 




miles was about 56 min. In 




* A * 



it ion 



was a service slack to about 30 m.p.tu 
over Brunei's ingeniously-designed Wye 
Bridge at Chepstow, while on 
able ' 




■ 



the speed was 




restrained to the war-time maximum 



of 





T as pilot to 

1 5 -coach 




60 m.p.h* 

The provision of a 2 
help the train engine 
load up the 4-mile bank, partially as steep 
as 1 in 6tJ, between Brimscombe and 

Sapper ton Tunnel, took most of the interest 
out of the Gloucester- Swindon run, but 

'Lvsatider" 




after shedding the 

covered the 17.2 miles from Sapperton to 

Swindon in the fair start-to-stop time of 

22 min. 22 sec, with a maximum of 65 

m.p.h. ik'vund Swindon a clear road could 

not be obtained until a laggaxd freight 

train had been shunted clear at Shriven - 



ham, after which "Lysander* "revved up" 

the 38 miles from Marston 




and cove 

Crossing Box to Reading in 44 y min. start 

to stop, average 51 m.p.h., or in a net 

time of about 43 min,, as we were badly 
checked in from Tilehurst. 

A noteworthy feature of this part of the 
run was the quite remarkable accuracy 
with which the driver stuck to his mile-a- 
minute maximum, the 25 miles from 

being co'v 

1 

min. 8 sec. pass-to-pass, with no 

than from 5i> 




to Tang. 






- 




variation in 
to 62 m.p.h.! Finally, the 35.5 miles from 
Reading to a signal stop outside Padding- 
ton were run in 43 1 min,, compared with 
an allowance for the full 3t> miles of 



47 min 



D. S. Barrie 



t 



wo overhead pantograph collectors of 



New Railcars for New Zealand 

There have recently been completed in 



En gl ish works 1 





with 



Diesel 




sion for mam-line work on 



Swiss standard pattern pick up current at 
15,000 v., and this is led to the two trans- 
formers through a circuit breaker. The 

motors are arranged transversely to work 



the New Zealand Government Railways, 
which are still in an active stage of 

development. The gauge is 3 ft. 6 in. The 

handsome cars are $$ ft. long, weighing 
40 J tons with a full complement 




in pairs. Eight sets of motor 

are required for development of full power 

output, which enables the engine to haul 

-1 1 7 



express trains 

* 



weighing 



as much as 





tons up gradients as steep as 1 in. 38 at a 



se tigers 

L -F 



t 



crew and 





maximum 



' 



ca rried on 1 2 




of 




40 



wheels. Seating is provided for 52 passengers 

in two saloons, separated by an entrance 

to engine room. 




vestibule, in 

luggage compartment and lavatory. Weld- 



m.p.h. Remarkable work indeed! Freight 
trains up to 750 tons weight can be worked 
up the same climbs at about 30-31 m.p.h. 

feature of Swiss electric pas- 




senger 



services 



has 



been the recent 









y 




■ 

L.M.S. No. 5487 "Combcimcre," a former L.N.W. engine of the "fcxperhnenft" class- This engine was withdrawn 
in 1934, The "bulge" under the smoke-box door was known as the "piano front/' Photograph by W, S. Garth, Luton. 








construction. 



been largely employed in the steel 



The engine is of 







six-cylinder vertical. 



development of fast, light-weight rail cars, 
three-car articulated sets, and "locomotive 
vans'* for hauling short trains at com- 




four-stroke Water-cooled type, and drives 

means of a five-speed gear-box and 

shafts. The West ingho use com- 
pressed air brake is fitted and there are 

air-operated entrance doors. With the 

doors are 



paratively high speeds. These vans have 

mail, luggage and lock-up compartments 

in addition to those housing the driving 




by 





that may be 

movement of a lever, to 
admit of entraining or detraining at halts 

when 



and electrical gear, 



Powerful 







Mixed Traffic Engines 




To 











wartime demands 



not provided with 
the doors are 




ornis 

and 




on Canadian main lines, a series of ex- 

4-S^l loco- 




car is 



stationary. Interior heating is effected by 



means of units utilising hot water drawn 






from the engine cooling system, and the 

whole equipment is exceedingly modern 

and complete. These cars have been proved 
capable of a notable turn of speed during 
the test runs that have been made, a 
maximum of 76 m.p.h. having been 
attained in the course of these, 



ceedingly 

motives of the "6100" class are being placed 
in service. These are capable of handling 
on suitable grades 100 cars of 

■ i , a 

15 to 20 

to an average of 55 m.p.h. They are fitted 

with mechanical stokers, large super- 





er vehicles at speeds up 





-water 




and roller 



gs. The total weight in working order 
is 343 tons and the overall length of engine 
and tender 94 ft. 










THE 







MAGAZINE 



89 






Scarborough Line Running 







42 mile branch connecting the East 
Coast main line at York with the famous 
resort of Scarlx)rough ami the coast lines 

radiating therefrom is peculiar in that all 



London Transport Food "Specials 1 * 
(\s many as 100,000 to 150,000 persons 



A USEFUL CRGSS- CO U tfTR Y LINK 







often 




Ke s 




for 




night in 



the 



deep-level tube stations of London spread 

I T ill J 

the present 



over a w 




area, 



during 




A time-table evrnt of the New Year has been the 

introduction of a through buffet car daily 
between Newcastle -on-Tyne and Ashford, Kent, via 
Sheffield, Leicester, Banbury, Reading, Guildford, 
Redhill, Tonbridge, avoiding the necessity of crossing 
London. The stock is provided on alternate davs by 
the S.R. and the L.N.E.R. A section of the C.W.K. 
is also traversed, that company taking a share in the 
provision of locomotive power. 






ADDITIONAL S.R. RESTAURANT CAR SERVICES 









In order to meet increased requirements, dining cars 
ate being run through daily for the first time in winter 
between Waterloo and Ilfracombe,and between Water- 
loo and Plymouth via Okebampton and the north 
side* of Dartmoor, over former L.S.W.R, metals. The 
through Brighton - Kx&ter-Plymouth daily service has 
also had its restaurant car restored, Pullman refresh- 



ment ears are 
trains on the Easter 



attached to nearly all the principal 

and Central Sections of the S-R. t 



as well as to some of the semi-fast services, 
NEW EXPRESS TANK ENGINE PERFORMANCE 









Ten years ago Sir Nigel Grefiley introduced on the 

L.N.E.R. U powerful 2-6-2T three -cylinder design, 

"VT* class, principally fur outer 




The up L»N.E.R* "Scarborough Flyer,' 1 non-stop York to King's Cross, hauled by No. 4903 "Peregrine/ 1 a stream- 
lined -Pacific/ 1 which is fitted with a double chimney. 



but two of the intermediate stations have 

been closed to passenger traffic which is 
diverted to buses operating on adjacent 
roads. Parcels and freight however are still 

dealt with by trains that stop as required, 

for these traffics mainlv in the 



turbulent conditions. Elaborate 









arrange- 



ment* havt* 




regulation 



act i v 



of this 




devised for the 
scale dormitorv 








while at the same time maintain- 



now forming the 

suburban work tu the I din burgh -Glasgow 
During a month's (rial at King's Cr- > shod, London, 
however, No. 2911 of this class proved herself capable 
of working speedily anil economically semi -ex press 
Cambridge and other main line trains running 4(1 to 
60 miles in the course of a single trip. Later locomotives 
of the type now work considerable distances on the 
Great Eastern section as well as regularly handling 
passenger trains in the North Eastern district. 

As announced in these columns, a new "V3" edition 
of the tvpe has been put to work. This has a boiler 
pressure* of 200 lb. per scj. in. compared with the 
ISO lb. per sq. in. previously standard, and there are 
10 engines numbered between 390 and 401 in service 
on the Newcastle-Middlesbrough and Newcastle- 
Carlisle buSet expresses, which make several stops 
with heavy corridor stock. The second of these, a 
famous cross-country route, is 60 J miles each way, 

und tourney the oioneer **V3'" 



running 



early morning. The country Js entirely 
rural and sparsely 



and late train services. At many 

stations in the evenings and early mornings 

Board 





a ted 



During the 



the London 

have undertaken the provision at papular 



Passenger 



busy summer season in normal times it is 

thus possible to operate the whole of the 



prices of tea, 




and m 




served into 



heavy holiday traffic at approximately the 



same last speed with less risk nf signal 

delays. An interesting variety of engines 
and rolling stock traversed the branch and 

returns. 

are very 



shclterers* own mugs only, and simple food 
from portable cans and baskets. Special 



refreshment supply trains run in the early 




afternoon to deposit dustproof fibre con 



tamers of 





doubtless will a^ain when peace 
ver the major portion 

.. and 50-min. non-stop expresses were 
numerous, including the summer "■ 

" to and from London. 



pro v isi on s 

have "feeding points," 



at the stations 




o 



at the same time 



collecting the empties from the 




vious 





car- 



night. In order to interfere as little as 
possible with the normal frequent pas- 

_ _ _ _ _ _ 



borough Fiver 
A 




• * 



current 



run 



226 






The Bilsdale," one of the 



behind No, 

" class 



senger service, 




an urban tube line are 



se unique speci 




on 



if 




30 




at each halt. 




allowed about 

■ ■ 



and on an eastbound journey me pioneer 
No, 390 had a load of 7 cars weighing 235 tons; empty 
or about 2tio tons gross on the 7*0 p.m. ex Carlisle. 
Up the four miles, mostly at 1 in 107, after getting 
away over the curves and junctions outside Carlisle, 
speed ranged from 374 "i*p,h. to 31 tn.p.h. t rising 
to 43 m.p.h, on th* easier 1 iti ±<*5 before Brampton 
i. Restarting on the I in 128 rise $1 m.p.hu was 
attained: but on a more level stretch through fine 
Border Scenery the rate of travel quickly rose to 
57 m.p.h. before Gilsland halt, The next stage on to 
Haltwhistle' is very sharply limed, as only 7 min. 
arc allowed for 5,3 miles, and half a minute was lost 
in spite of a rapid start down the I in 311 and a 
maximum of 61 i m*p»h. Getting away again there was 
a fast run along the Roman Walt country past Bardon 
Mill and Haydon Bridge, with a maximum of 71 
m.p.h*; and although speed had to foe reduced to 

20 m.p.h* for a p.w. slack, Hexham was reached in 
19 i min, actual, or IS ruin, net, compared with an 
allowance of 21 min. The average speed start to-stop 

over this section was 54.4 m.p.h* 

The remaining portion of the run is easy but winding, 




4-4-0 engines, hauling 



six coaches 

gave a time of 28 min. 

to the first stop at Malton. This was the 

peacetime allowance for the 21£ miles from 



weighing 200 tons, 



York and 2 min. faster 




the present 



schedule. The maximum speed was 63 

- 



m.p.h, on the slight descent past Barton 



Hil L. 




along the 




cur 







Castle Howard section, with its pretty- 
where a speed restriction of 

45 m.p.h. applies for a considerable 




distance, 




minimum was down to 



f 




ner 



38 m.p.h. From Malton, which is practically 
half-way, the 18 miles to passing 

the only other "open" station, on a fairly 
level road took only 20 J min. 




the 21 



miles into 



Scarborough 



with an 




finish occupied 24} min. Thus fully 2 min 

had 

speed 




been 



gained 



with 



a maximum 




m.p.h. and most of a 
start had been recouped. 

With a heavier nine-coach 300 ton train, 
one of the earlv N.Ii.R. two-cyl. Atlantics 
of Worsdell's "V" class, now L.N.E.R. 

r 




( 
41 







," took practically the full 30 min. to 
Malton, speed not rising above 55 m.p.h. 
The second stage for which 29 min. are 
allowed, was covered in 27 fc min. however. 



L.N.E.R. tip "Coronation" express passing through Co. Durham at speed showing observation car in rear. Photograph 

bv W. B. Greenfield. 



More 



a 



Hall 



1 t 



Class Locomotives 



with 




running 





xc 




mile-a-miiuite rate. 






ing 




* 



* 



* 



* 





cars owned 






States railways joined to 




the United 
er would make 




f i 



Mall 



I f 



n e w 

motives noted 

41 



6906 






up 



a train 




13,300 miles in length 



n h am 
Hall" No. 6909 
6910 "Gossington Hall 




class 4-6-0 mixed 
on the 6.W.R. 

" No. 6907 
1 ' Downham 



Hall" and No 



if 



so that several slowings were enforced; yet the 17-rnilc 
stage on to Blaydon, where industrial areas appeare 
was covered with more than a minute to spare* On 
arrival in Newcastle the new tank enpine had about 
4| mm. to her credit with this 260- ton train oo the 
by no means imsv overall booking of the run. which 
had hitherto been pferform**d by 4-4-0 tender engine 
of the "Shire** or "Hunt" tvpe. Water was taken once 
on the way. at Hexham, and the driver was evidently 
pteasftd with the locomotive 's performance aj;ri j-ower* 









90 




MECCANO 





Our 



Read 



ers 



* 



This pas* is reserved for articles from our readers. Contributions not exceeding 500 words in length 
are invited on any subject of which the writer has special knowledge or experience. These should be 
written neatly on one stde of the paper only, ami should be accompanied if possible by original photo- 
graphs for use as illustrations. Articles published wilt be paid for. Statements in articles submitted 
are accepted as being sent in good faith f hut the Editor takes no responsibility for their accuracy* 



A Visit to some Romano-British 

Pottery Kilns 



When friends of mine suggested that we 



should visit some 




Roman pottery 



kilns in the New Forest I was greatly 



interested . 





are about five 



Norway's Highest Railway Station 

On this page is a picture of the railway 



winter clothing is a necessity almost all 



miles north east of Ringwood, and to my 

eye they looked like mere 



inex 





station at Finse, in 

9 



Norway, the 



hi ghest 




an 



station on the amazing railway that crosses 

Norwegian mountains on its way from 




Oslo to 




level 

the rack 




en. It stands 4, 




ft. above 



apart from the termini of 

pin ion lines of the Alps, is 



thought to be the highest station in Europe, 
It was raided by the KA.F. in the attack 
on the Bergen-Oslo railway towards the 
end of last year. 

I have travelled on this wonderful line 



the year round. Here there is a monument 
to Captain Scott and his brave companions, 
who were forestalled by the 
explorer Amundsen by one month in their 
great journey to the South Pole. 

We came to Haugastol in 
the early afternoon, and there 
we left the train on its descent 
to Oslo, while we cycled 
across the mountains to the 

little village of Vik-i-Eidfjord, 

at the inner end of the great 



mounds of dark clay cov 

and brambles. It is not very 



w it h 
dilii 





find them, however, once one knows what 
they look like, and this I very soon 

The first of the kilns I saw were on the 
edge of a wood near a horse-shoe shaped 



for 60 miles from Voss to Haugastol, 
starting at a height of 185 ft., surmounting 
the summit at 4,267 ft. and de-training 
at 3/240 ft. above sea level. A feature of 
the line is that it crosses the mountains 
rather than tunnels through them. There 
are tunnels, of course, 17S of them, with 

a total length of 23 miles. The longest is 





3 miles 
»sete 

to bore 





in length, between 
and it took 12 years 



F. Marriott (Birkenhead). 

Making Imitation 

Pheasant's Eggs 

Mr. \V. H. Bailey is one of 

the few wood turners in the 

eount.rv who still do all 
work by hand, and he is per- 

the only man living 

whose main business consists 











We placed our bicycles in the van, 





' 



train began to climb 

tortuous slopes. 





immediately 

snorting heavily on 
For 60 miles of its route the line is 
the level of the pine trees, and for 30 miles 
no trees are to be seen at all, even the 

birches failing to survive at the 

height reached. Great screens have been 

to prevent drifts and so ease the 
work of the snow ploughs, and long tunnels 
of staunch timber have been erected to 



in making imitation 
pheasants' and partridges' 
eggs. When I visited him in 



his little workshop at King's 




hi 1 was 



busil 






on an 





order for 1 

73 




enga 




1 




of 



Mr. Bailey 



* 



last October, 




w as 

began work when he was 15, 
and since then he has been 




wegian 








om snow, 



The 



engaged 









as a 






ive 



ploughs, 



1 la ve 

prevention is better 



cure. 







Myrdal we looked from the station 



except for a 

period during the last war. 

Sycamore is the wood used 

for making these imitation 

eggs. The tree branches are first sawn into 




Giving an imitation pheasant's egg its final shaping on the lathe. Photo- 




wn over a precipice, thous< 
of feet below, where a lake 

r 




see 




-i 



to 



uitable 











gths 



on sawing trestle 






after 



graph by J* W. Morton, March* 



that was used as an apiary by the 






iwise on the 



await anyone who fell off the station! But 

it is not quite like that, and a 



road descends to the lake. On 



winding 

last 



split 
block. The first rough shaping is carried 

out by means of a shave 



early Britons. The hives were 
rows, one behind the other, 
round the bank. The hollow 








com 




the work is 
on a lathe. The greater part of 




m 

way 

south, 



the 



actual wood 





rning is 



don 



so that the hives were splendidly pku.ed 

in a veritable sun trap. 

The pottery found at these kilns is very 



B 



during the wanner 
months of the year. 



\Y 1 1 en 




cold 

■ 




weather arrives the 






imitation 



hand 



e ggs are 



pa i nted 



Mr. Bailev at 



by 




simple, ind is without ornamentation 

Evidently the clay was not very good 

here, since the products were mainly bowls 

pots just thumbed out and not made * 
on a potter's wheel. About two miles away 
were more kilns where the 
verv good, many of the bowls found here 

_ m ■■ 





was 



In une 



The 



eggs 



having unique 




s 



tigns-. 







receive two coats 
paint and when 

finished it is diili- 

cult to tell 






that 



Finse, the highest station on the 




vay between Oslo and 

Photograph bv F. Marriott, Birkenhead. 




en, in Norway, 



from the real 

eggs 
Mr, Bailey makes 

are used to deceive 

hen pheasants into 
believing that thev 

hatch out their own 

eggs. These are 

placed under broc 

I ... 



many and varied, some being just angular 
markings formed by a stick when the clay 
was still soft, while others were painted on 

afterwards. These latter are 

autiful, some being in the shape of 



a n ( I 



v 




■cry 

stars and half-moons, and others of inter- 
woven flowers 



Fl agon 




S pO 11 1 S , C U p 




lids and 




hens, the hen 



climb to the summit the train makes Great 



o 



loops as it finds the easiest way across the 



mou 



+ 





at times it is 




m o s t 



possible to see the front and rear ends of 
the train at the same time. 

At Finse there is always snow, and 



pheasants in the meantime sitting on the 

wooden imitations, and only receiving their 



own eggs when these are ready for hatching 



out. In 




. 



way 



a larger 




ion of 



young pheasants can be hatched out and 



reared. 




\V. Morton (March) . 



dishes can be found in addition to 
bowls. The cooking dishes were reinforced 
with flints to give them strength to stand 

up to the strain of the baking in ovens to 

which they were subjected. 

Good examples of all these things can he 
dug up easily, and recently there have been 
extensive excavations in the district, in the 
course of which many complete bowls were 

Some of these actually had on them 
the fingerprints of the workers of 
2.0U0 years ago. 

M. A. Glenn te (Oundle). 









THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



91 






\ 






New 




eccano 






Fine Subjects for Outfits 



No. 





No. 




THE model tower wagon shown in Fig, 1 
is designed for construction from the 




in Outfit No 



a. 







st ruction is 

. Two 






commenced by building the 

12-J* Strips 1 are joined to the flanges of 

a 4 J* Flanged Sector Plate and to 

4£"x2£* Flexible Plates that 

the sides of the bonnet, The front 



two 




are 

ft 



14 



mounted on springs made up 

Strips, bent to the 




91* 



and 



Sector Plate. A 

Bush Wheel 4 
on 

end of the Rod 
is bolted to a 

2\* Strip that 
is bent slightly 

and lock- 
nutted to th? 



3}* 





re- 



chassis at 



paired shape and 

their forward ends by a 2|*$Strip 2, their 

bolted to the Flanged 



2V 



Strip 



of 



the steering 



rear ends being 
Sector Plate. 

The main parts of the steering gear are 
two right-angle cranks, each formed from 
two Flat Brackets bolted rigidly at right 

angles to each other on a \" Bolt. This 




At the rear 



the 



Strip? 



I 



Bolt 



serves also to attach the crank 



pivotally to the centre hole of the spring. 
A similar unit is required at each side of 



the 




The cranks are arrane 



so 



that one of their arms lies along the line 
of the chassis. These arms are joined by 
a 2 \" Strip that forms the track rod, and 
the road wheels are mounted on 4" Bolts 



are bolted to 

a 5i* X 2T 
Flanged Plate 

5, and two 

i*xtf Angle 
rackets 

bolted to this 
Plate provide 





Fig. 2, An amusing model of a barber and his customer. It is operated by a Magic Motor, 

and can be built from parts in Outfit No, 3. 







ings for a 4* Rod, on which two Road 



Wheels are mounted. 



passed through Angle Brackets bolted to 

the other arms. 

The rear side of the cab is filled in with 



The fixed 
of four 
chassis. 




of the tower consists 




Angle 



Girders 



* f 



lied to the 



Flat Brackets held 




a 2^X 
Circular Plate 



2 \ ' ' 



Flexible Plate and a Semi- 




and the back 



is a 5$"XW Flexible Plate, A 2VxY 

Double Angle Strip bolted between the 
Strips 1 provides a bearing for the steerin 
column 3, a second bearing being provided 
■ a 2\" Strip bolted to thejupper Flanged 



Bolts 6 are secured to the Angle Girders 
to form slides for the movable tower. 

The tower is raised and lowered by 
turning a 3£* Crank Handle journalled in 

Flat Trunnions bolted to the chassis. 



Flexible Plate bent as shown and attache* I 
at one end to the legs by a 2£*xi* Double 
Angle Strip. The other end of the Flexible 

e is secured to a 2£*X J* Double Angle 
Strip 1, to each end of which a 2\" Cranked 
Curved Strip is bolted. A head" 
made from a Flat Trunnion which, 









er w 







a 





Two lengths 





of Cord are attached to the 
Handle, and they pass over 1* Pulleys 

mounted on Rod 7, their other ends being 
fastened to the lower end of the tower. 



Motor, is bolted to 
the Double Angle Strip. Two Trunnions 
are joined to the Flanged Plate to provide 
bearings for a Z\" Rod 2._A V Pulley 

lixi'd on one 



* 

is 





a 



A 



led l'xl' 




Angle 

has a Threaded 




pivo 

B rac k e t 8 

Pin secured in one of its 
arms and the other arm 



this Rod and is con- 

Driving Band to the 

pulley of the Magic Motor. At the other 
end of the Rod is another V Pulley that 



has 
its 




2 

boss by 



X-J-" Angle Bracket 3 secured to 



a Nut and Bolt. A 




« 



loose 




^m 



a Spri n g 




on 

the Crank Handle. The Angle 

is held in position 

2 \" Driving Band, 

is fastened to it and 




Pulley bolted to the Angle Bracket forms 
a simple cam. 

The arms of the man in the chair are 




a 



w 




i 






attac 



upper 
Curved 




Double 



a 




Plate that forms his 



Brackets at their 
2**x2i* large radius 



» «:i 



then 

Crank Handle. 



Parts 
tower 
No. 



around 



the 



y. The 



required to build model 

wagon; 8 of No. 1; 12 of 

2; 2 of No. 3; II of No. 5; 2 of 

No. 6a; 4 of No. 8; 8 of No, 10; 

9 of No, 12; 1 of No. 12a; 1 of 
No, 15b; 2 of No. 16; 1 of No. 19g; 

3 of No. 22; 1 of No. 23; 1 of No. 
24; 3 of No. 35; 90 of No. 37af; 
77 of No. 37bf; 11 of No. 38; ] of 

No. 40; I of No. 48; 8 of No. 48a; 

1 of No. 51; 1 of No. 52; 2 of No. 
.S4a; 4 of No, 90a; 2 of No. Ilia; 

4 of No. 11 Ic; 1 of No. 115; 2 of 
No. 126; 2 of No, 126a; 1 of No. 
155a; I of No. 176; I of No. 186; 
4 of No. 187; 2 of No. 188; 2 of 
No. 189; 4 of No. 190; 2 of No. 191; 

2 of No. 192; 2 of No. 200; 1 of 
No. 



Double Brackets are also bolted to the 

- 

Double Angle Strip 1. His head is a Bush 

Wheel mounted on a f* Bolt inserted in 



the Flat Trunnion. 
The 

joining 
Curved 




barber is formed by 
2i*x2|* U-section 

Strips 




Plates. To these two 
are then bolted, and they are secured at 
their other ends to the Flanged Plate by 
| # Xi" Angle Brackets and Flat Brackets, 
Each arm is a Formed Slotted Strip, the 
right arm being lock-nutted to the body. 
One end of a length, of Cord is fastened 
to the shoulder end of this arm; its other 
end is looped and is then passed through a 



1 io le 



2 1 4, 



Strip 



forming 



the barber's 



The amusing 
barber at work 




of a 



right leg. The loop must fit loosely around 



tl 



on 



his 



ic groove of the £" 




forming the 



■ ■ 



victim" that is s 



I town 



cam, and the Cord should be tightened 



*- 



in 




2, can be built from 

the parts in Outfit No. 3. 
It is driven by a Magic 

r, and when this is put 
in motion the barber sets 
to work in a most realistic 



so that it raises and lowers the barber's 
arm when the Motor is set in motion. 



The distance 



through 



which 




razor 





manner. The 




is 



the 



Fig. 1. A working model Tower Wagon designed for construction from 

parts in Outfit No. 5, 



first part of the model to 




The back and 



seat 



are formed of a 4£*x2£ 



moves can be increased or decreased by 
justing the lengthof the barber's right arm. 

Parts required to build model barber: 8 of No. 5; 
4 of No. 10; 2 of No. II ; 8 of No. 12; 1 of No. 1 6; 

3 of No. 22; 1 of No. 23; 1 of No. 24; 2 of No. 35; 
49 of No. 37af; 45 of No. 37bf; 4 of No, 38; 1 of 
No. 40; 2 of No. 4Sa; 1 of No. 52; 4 of No. 90a; 3 of 
No. Illc; 2 of No. 126; 1 of No. 126a; 1 of No. 155a; 
I of No. 1KB; 1 of No. 191; 2 of No. 199; 1 of No. 200; 

4 of No. 215. 1 Magic Motor (not included in Out in . 



» 



92 



THE 




MAGAZINE 







Mob 






ne 



Castor Steering and Electric 











devices have been inven- 






ted in an endeavour to solve the 
problem of high speed handling and 



section 



rs 
2. 







ion 




materials 



and 



merchandise. One of the most popu- 



Fig- , 

ed from two 

9V 



lar and interesting of these is 



the 



Angle 

Girders. 



mobile crane that forms the subject 



of the fine Meccano model sh< iwn in 




7 ig. L The actual crane is entirely 

self-contained, with its own power 
unit, and combines the stability and 
efficiency of a stationary crane with 
extreme mobility; Its travel is not 
confined to a set of rails, or hindered 

from an external 



These 

bridged 
two 



are 




•"» 



connected at 
their 



r 



rear 



ends by a 4 




tr 




by trailing 
power supply, so that it can be used 

goods over a wide 






1 e 

to 

i s 



area. 



The pt iwer unit in the model is an 



Electric Motor, 



and 



the luffing, 



hoisting and travelling operations 

can each be brought into plav by 
the movement of levers within easy 
reach of the operator. The crane is 
slewed by rotation of a pivoted rear 
castor controlled from the operator's 
cab. 

Construction of the model should 



A n 
Girder, 

which 

bolted 

Flat 

■ 

and two AY 

X 2V 
Plates 3. 

The front 




Flat 




4 



is 



be commenced 



by 



building the 



chassis. This consists of two channel 



jo urn ailed in 
Handrail 

Supports 

to 

built up 

semi-elliptic 





*Ig. I, A general view of the new Super Model Electric Mobile Crane. 




springs attached to the chas- 
sis, and it carries two 2" 
Pulleys fitted with Tyres. The 
front of the driving cab is a 



Channel Bearing 9 bolted to one of 
the Motor sideplates. The Bevel 
drives a similar Bevel mounted on 
a 2\" Rod that carries 




a 




Plate bent 
as shown and attached to 




" 



diam. 




tr 



face Pinion 







The Pinion 

















1 




7 



is in constant mesh with a 57-teeth 
Gear 11 on a 2Y Rod, which also 



two 3* Formed Slotted Strips. 
At its upper corners it is 
bolted to 2i"x2|" Flat Plates 

fixed to the girders 1 by Obtuse 
Angle Brackets. 



carries a 




Pinion 12, Fig. 




An 




or E20B Electric 



Motor is attached to one of 



, and 

two Collars. This Rod forms the 
layshaft and can be moved sideways 
in its bearings by moving the control 

latter is a 2" 
Rod inserted in a Coupling attached 



lever 13, Fig. 3. 




to 



one end of an 8* Rod 



the 3 




tt 



Angle 




at the 



carries at its rear end a 



forward end of the chassis 



A 









by \" X i" Angle Brackets, and 
its sideplates are extended by 




/' 




Bolt is fixed in the end hole of 



two 2|*x2|* Flat Plate that 

are secured to them bv two 







I* Corner Brackets but 
spaced from them by Washers. 
The 2i # x21* Flat Plates are 



the Crank and its head engages 
between a Collar on the layshaft and 
the Pinion 12. 

At this point it is advisable to 
assemble the automatic brake that 






to 



two 




2\» 
Girders fixed to- the 
Plates 3. 

A Worm on the armature 
shaft of the Motor meshes 



maintains the load when the drive 

to operate the other 
movements of the crane. On the 
left-hand end of the layshaft is a 

ar, and when the 
moved the Collar pushes a 
end of a 1" 






with a 




n» 



on a 2 



Pinion 8 mou 
Rod 






that is fixed in a 








carries a 



Fig. 2. An underneath view of the Electric Mobile Crane, showing 

the caster and steering mechanism. 




n 



Bevel Gear and a Collar. 



Coupling held on a 2* horizontal 
Rod 17. The V Rod is kept in close 
contact with the Collar on the 






This Rod is journalled in a 




In 



j 



a 



short 





of Spring 




% 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



93 
















and a bearing for this Rod 
is provided by a Han 
Support 24. 

The Pinion 12 on 
layshaft meshes with a 
50-teeth Gear mounted on 
a 2" Rod 25 that carries 

also two Cord Anchoring 

Rod 26 
Pulleys, 



Gear 16 and then passed around the 
two centre Pulleys on the Rod 28, 
over the jib head Pulleys and around 
the Pullev of the Single Sheave 





Block. Finally the 

Rat Bracket on 



is 






rings, 
carries 




two 



2" 



Rod 26. 
Two equal 



lengths 



of cord for 



raising 




and lowering 

[H'<] ;iT i Uir nj ihrll 




• * 








are 



to the 



over which the cord for 




Cord Anchoring Springs on the Rod 



Bracket 
to pivot and is held in 



place by Collars. The shaft 



25, and are then passed around the 
outer 1" Pulleys on the Rod 28 and 
around the V Pulleys on the Rod 26. 
Their other ends are fastened to the 
Rat Bracket mounted on the Rod 28. 



25 is controlled by a foot- 
brake that consists of a 



This 

the model, 




the assembly of 
before it is set in 



■ 

length of cord fastened operation it is advisable to oil the 
at one end to the side of gearing and bearings, and to see 

gear " 






Fig. 3. The crane photographed from above to show the position of the 

Electric Motor and the control lever. 



around 



a 1 





the 




run 




Pulley fixed 



Cord 




Rod 17 is journalled in a 
' Double Angle Strip bolted 
chassis, and is retained 






r Collars at 
band is a belt of 
Cord, which passes around a Bolt 
and around a 1" Pulley on a Z\" Rod 
that carries also a 50-teeth Gear 16 
and a Cord Anchoring Spring. 



The castor unit and its gears are 
constructed as follows. Two \Yy\" 



Double 



Angle 



Flat Girder 




Strips and two \\" 
are bolted together to 
form a cage as shown in Fig. 2. Two 
\\" Angle Girders are then bolted 
to the Flat Girders, and they in turn 



are attached by means of two 
Bolts to a 57-teeth Gear mounted on 




a Rod 18. The 



An gl e 



Girders 




spaced from the Gear by the length 
of the Bolts. The lower end of Rod 



18 is inserted in the longitudinal 



bore of 
mounted 




through its centre 



19, which is 

Rod pushed 



transverse bore. 



18 carries also a \" Pinion that 
with a IV Con t rate 20 on 
the Rod of Coupling 19. At its upper 




end 




18 carries a 





* Contrate 

Flat Plate 



and is iournalled in 

of the chassis and a H"x|" Double 

Angle Strip bolted above the Plate. 

The castor is steered from the 

's cab. The Steering Wheel 




is fixed on 



a 3V 




in 




3 



ft 



xir 



od iourna 

J 




2 




Plate bolted to the 



chassis framework and in a Double 

Bent Strip bolted above the Plate. 



A I 

end 




^ 



-r* 



Bevel mounted on 



the 




r 






o 



f thi 



s 



Rod meshes with a 




Bevel fixed on a 2" Rod journalled 
in £*X^* Angle Brackets, and is 



connected to a 4" Rod bv a Uni- 




versal Coupling 23. A Worm on the 
rear end of the 4" Rod meshes with 
the 57-teeth Gear of the castor unit, 



tied 



on the Rod 25 and finally 

27 in the cab. 








made up of a 




Bracket bolted to 




centre 




of a Double Bracket, which in 
turn is pivoted on a Double Bracket 



Parts required to build model electric mobile crane: 

4 of No. 2; 2 of No, 2a; 3 of No. 3; 3 of No. 5; 2 of No. 6a; 
2 of No. 7a; 6 of No. 8a; 5 of No. 9; 2 of No. 9a; 2 of No. 
9b; 2 of No. 9d; 1 of No. 9e; 2 of No, 9f; 4 of No, 10; 
2 of No. 11; 8 of No. 12; 2 of No. 12c; 1 of No. 13a; 
2 of No. 15; I of No. 15a; 1 of No. 15b; 1 of No. Ifi: 

5 of No. 16a; 6 of No. 17; 1 of No. 18a; 3 of No. 18b; 
2 of No. 20a; 2 of No. 21; 4 of No. 22; 6 of No. 22a; 

1 of No. 25; 2 of No. 26; 1 of No. 26a; 2 of No. 27: 

2 of No. 27a; I of No. 28; 1 of No. 29; 2 of No. 30; 1 of 
No. 30a; 1 of No. 30c; 2 of No. 32; 156 of No. 37;af 




to 




of 



the 




floor 
T h e 



brake cord is at- 
tached to the rear 
of the Flat Bracket. 

of the 

X 3* " 





body 

Flat 



is a o^ 



i " 






Plate bolted 
Angle Gir- 

to 

girders 1. Two 

An^le Girders are 

arranged to 

an "A" frame, as 
shown, and at their 




upper 




ends 

to the 



are 







the arm of 
a Crank. 

The construction 

of the jib is quite 

and its de- 
tails arc clear 

the 
The 

leys 



sim 








m 




illustrations. 

head pul- 

are m-wiited 

on a l\" Rod jour- 
nalled in Trunnions 
A 5" Rod 28 jour- 



n a 



en d 




o 



at 
f the 




e rear 



car- 





nes tour 1 

Pulleys spaced from 

each other by 

Collars. Two Flat 

Brackets are placed on the Rod 

between the Collars and the outer 

Pulleys. 

The cord for raising and lowering 

a Cord 

of 





the load is 
Anchoring Spring on 



Fig. 4. The gearing and operating cords seen from the rear of the crane. 

136 of No. 37bf; 63 of No. 38; 1 of No 40; 1 of No. 45; 
4 of No. 48; I of No. 48b; 2 of No. 52a; 2 of No. 53a; 
3* of No. 58; 1 of No. 58b; 28 of No. 59; 3 of No. 62; 
3 of No. 63; 4 of No. 72; 1 of No. 73; 1 of No. 82; 
2 of No. 90a; I of No. 103c; 2 of No. 103f; 3 of No. 
103h; 2 of No. Ill; 4 of No. II 1c; 2 of No. 125; 2 of 
No. 126; 2 of No. 133a; 7 of No, 136; 1 of No. 140; 

2 of No. 142a; 2 of No. 142(1; 1 of No. 151; 1 of No. 160; 

3 of No. 176; 1 of No. 185; 1 of No. 191; 2 of No. 215. 

1 E20B or E6 Electric Motor. 




the 




94 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 




Fig. 498. 

I 

(498) Twin Three-Position Levers 

Fig. 49 




and 



shows a method of constructing 

mounting levers intended 



for such 



purposes as gear changing, or the application 
of brakes in model cranes and excavators. 

m 



A 2£*xl|* Double Angle Strip is bolted 



in any required 
the model and 




the -base of 

vertical lugs 

supports a %\* Strip. The centre holes of 
these Strips carry Double Brackets con- 



nected together 




The 



upper 

further 



ends 




icr 




Strips. 



Strips 





set of Double Brackets, 

port quadrants 
by 2\* small radius Curved Strips, 
gear levers 49 and 50 consist of 2\" Strips 
pivotal ly attached by means of a \%" Rod 

already 




to the two horizontal 2 \ 
mentioned. The Rod is oreven 
moving sideways by two 










Each of 

the two levers carries a nut and bolt 49a 
as shown, and in each case this 



eng; 





with the three holes of its quadrant, to 

hold the lever in any desired position. 

Each lever is coupled to its res 

mechanism in the gear-box by a Strip or 

Rod 48, which is lock-nutted to the lower 
end of the 2|" Strip. If a greater move- 
ment of the Strip 48 is required it should 



be fitted to 




lever in a 




er position. 



(499) Silent Free Wheel 

(N. C. Ta'Bois, Woodford Green) 

Fig. 499 shows a novel free wheel device 

V.* 

that is particularly useful for incorporation 

in models where quiet running is specially 




N 



C. 



desirable. It was suggested 
Ta'Bois, Woodford Green. A 3** Rod 1 
has a Bush Wheel attached at one end 
and a Collar 2 at the other. A J 'awl without 
Boss is fitted with a Flat Bracket and an 





• 



ion 




w 



Spanner 



// 



Angle Bracket, which are bolted to it as 
shown, A Collar and Washer are bolted to 
the Angle Bracket by a |* Bolt. The Bolt 3, 



which secures the Angle Bracket to the 



[500) An Indoor Clothes 

(J. Mathews, Aylesbeare Common) 




ne 






Pa w 1 . is 




sere 




into the centre 






tapped hole of a Coupling 4, and must be 

free to rotate slightly. A similar unit is 

to the other side of the Coupling. 

from the Bush 




Coupling is 

Wheel bv one Washer. 










A Socket Coupling 5 carries a 50-tceth 
Gear Wheel in one end and a Collar in 
the other. 



A useful clothes line device that is 
suitable for use wh n light clothes are to 
be dried or Hired indoors is suggested by 
Matthews, Aylesbeare Common. It is 
shown in Fig. 500. 

The frame of the model consists of four 

le Girders arranged as shown. To 







Coupling 
Washer. 



s Collar is spaced from the 

the Fa wis by one 



carrving 
A Bolt 6 



of the centre holes of two 
Girders are bolted a 31" Strip 
AVxV Double Angle Strip 2. Two more 




4.1 "XV Don Lie 




the 

car- 
is 



elongated hole 
Flat Bracket 
ries a Nut 

locked against the 
Socket Coupling. 

With the exception 
of the Bush 
the Collar 2 
on the 

free to 




through the 



Angle 



Strips are bolted 



c» 



to the same Girders, and the other ends 




1 

w" 

■ ■ID 
1 ■ 1 


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are 

inde- 






ft 






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:" mu.'wf 



. r 





pendently of the Rod, 

drive is taken up 
by the 50-teeth Gear 

is transmitted to 
the Pawls by the Flat 
Brackets. The Coupling 
tends to remain sta- 

and the pull 
Flat Brackets 
turns the Pawl and Flat 

Bracket unit, until the 
Pawls engage in the 



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:■:■« 









5» 



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of 



the 



Bush 



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Wheel, which 







in 




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drives the 

The whole device then 

rotates as one unit. 

When the gear is 

rotated in the opposite 

direction the reverse action takes place, 

the Pawls being retracted from the Bush 

. . 



W 



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Wliee 1 



and 





ocket 




ing and 



Coupling with their trappings rotate idly 

un the Rod. 






The purpose of the Collar and Washer 
bolted to the Angle Bracket is to prevent 
the Pawls being disengaged by centrifugal 
force. If it is intended to rotate the 

the Collars and 



of the two pairs of Double Angle Strips 
are joined by two 3^* Strips 3. A Trunnion 
4 fitted with a Handrail Support is bolted 
to the lower 3±" Angle Girders. The 



Handrail Supports provide bearings for 



a 24" 




Rod « fitted 




a Bush 



mechanism only 




Angle Brackets may be discarded as 



tli 



Wheel that carries a Threaded Pin and a 
Y Bevel Gear. The Bevel Gear meshes with 
a \\ m Bevel Gear on a <S|" Rod 7, which 
carries also a Wood Killer held between 



ie 




centrifugal force exerted on the Pawls will 

not be sufficient 

_ • to raise them from 

the holes of the 
Bush Wheel until 

a fairly high speed 
is attained. 

ad- 
vantage ot this 

free wheel over 

the usual Pawl and 
Ratchet type de- 
vice is tliat it trans- 



two Bush Wheels secured to the Hud. 

The ends of the clothes line are gripped 
under a 5* Rod held by Collars in the 

of the Wood Roller. Outside the 



groove 





Wheel on the rear end of the .(U* 
Hod 7 is a Ratchet Wheel, and a Pawl 
attached to the frame by a Pivot Bolt 
prevents the cord from running out when 
the winding handle is released. The 
is attached to the drum so that one 










the 



drive 





in its 



in 
operation. Other 

useful features are 
its compactness 

and shape, which 
allow it to be 



end of the cord unwinds as the other 
end winds up. 

The indoor clothes-line should be firmly 
secured by the two 3\* Strips 3 to a wall, 
in such a position that the winding handle 
is easily accessible. 



If desired, the winding handle mav be 




lengthened by using a longer Rod in place 
of the Rod 6, but it will be necessary to 

produce an additional support for this, as 



near as 







to 




handle end. This 



Mg. 4»y 



incorporated in 

small models. 



may be a Handrail Su pport bolted to an 
Angle Girder attached to the frame. 





i 



I 



THE 




MAGAZINE 



95 



e 





- 




Meccano 



Mod 







The 

w i 11 n 
eri tries 

it 



pnze- 

ing 
in the 



Suggestions" 

Competition, 
which 



was 

announced in 



the 

1940 
the 



October 



issue 



of 



M.M. 



t * 




are most in- 

and 

the best among 

them will be 
illustrated and 

described in 



detail 
1 1 



in 



Sugges- 



tions 
Hon" 
due course 



See- 
in 






T 



h 



e 



Prize-winners In recent 
Meccano competitions* Top, 
A* N. Carter, Melbourne, Aus- 
tralia. Bottom, S. Hall, Bingjcy* 



names of the 







e - win- 



ners are as 
follows: 

H* Everett, Linden 



First Prize, Cheque for £3/3/-: 

Wood; Second, Cheque for £2/2/-: A. Brown, 
Oldbury; Third, Cheque for £1/1/-: N. Ta'Bois, 

Woodford Green. 
Prizes value 10/6: C. West, London S.E.18; K. 

Poole, Walsall; A. Simros, Bangor, N. Ireland, 

J, Palmer, West Town, Nr. Bristol; G, Dean, 

Newcastle-upon-Tyne 3. 
Prizes value 5/-: E. Brick, Cardiff; E. Barras, 

c, Portsmouth; J. Cole, 

Rottingdean; H. Clear, Armagh. 

H. S. 






The First Prize was won 

Everett, Linden Wood, who contributed 
an electrically-operated control for 
creeper tractors. This device is intended 
chiefly for tractors and tanks that are 
driven by an electric motor, 
enjoyment may be obtained by installing 
it in model tanks and arranging miniature 
battles. The mechanism consists of two 
solenoids that are energised 






by 
tank 




the steeri 



r ise 



ng wheel of 
and anti- 





L\vise 






Levers are connected to the cores of the 

solenoids and these cause \" Pinions to 



engage or disengage 1£* Con t rates fixed 



on the half axles that carry the creeper 
sprockets. 

A. F. Brown, Oldbury, was awarded 
the Second Prize for a neat and compact 
retractable undercarriage suitable for 
use with either the landing wheels or the 
tailwheel of an aeroplane. This device 
is strongly constructed and permits of 



easy o 

The 

on 




front the pilot's cabin. 



is moun 




on an 




secured 



pivotally attached to the 
framework by Small Fork Pieces. Move- 
ment of these Rods is controlled by two 
Curved Strips pivoted at one end to a 
Coupling, which is moved longitudinally 
by a Screwed Hod rotated by a J* Pinion. 
N. C. Ta'Bois, Woodford Green, was 

Third Prize for a solenoid- 



Building Competitions 



By 



w 



Spanner 



n 



Pri 







winners in 




e 



w 



Suggestions" Contest 




operatin g ' thro u gh a crank, a Pawl 

a Hatchet Wheel. This Rod carries a 







five-sided cam, which in turn causes 
£" Pinion to move into or out of mesh 
with a 50-teeth Gear on the Rod of the 

winding drum. 

G. A. Dean, Gosforth, submitted inter- 
esting suggestions for independently sprung 

front and rear suspension units suitable 

for incorporation in a model motor chassis. 

v are based on what is known as the 

which 




m 



a 



wish-bone bracket system. 

difference in length in a pair of brackets 

from which the wheels are suspended 
maintains the wheel track constant at the 

point of contact with the road, under all 




A remote-controlled level-luffing crane that won a prize for 

N* C. Ta'Bois, Woodford Green, in a Meccano competition. 



conditions of load and 



s 








Swivel Bearings joined together represent 

the track rod and these ensure correct 

wheel movement and provide flexibility. 

In the case of the rear axle unit, the 

w 





differential drives two 1 \" Sprockets that 

independently of each other on 
pivot bolts secured in a Coupling mounted 
in the centre of the axle unit. The drive 

■ 

control mechanism for model * is then transferred from the Sprockets to 

the wheels by built-up universal couplings 



cranes. A novel feature of this mechanism 
is a simple device that ensures the "pull" 



of the 




remaining constant, in- 



stead of decreasing, as it normally does, 
when the core is pushed into the Coil, 
When the current is switched on the core 
rotates a Rod l/10th of a revolution, 



made from Angle Brackets, 

Among the many other interesting 
suggestions submitted were revolution- 
counters, clutches and gear-boxes for 
cranes, and I shall include some of these in 

from time to time. 




/, ons 




on 




ity 



ft 



Contest 



Meccano 'Origi 

In this competition prizes will be awarded 
for Meccano models of an original nature. 
Models of any type and size may be entered 
and the judges will make their awards 
mainly for novelty in choice of subject and 
in the use of Meccano parts. Although new 
and unusual subjects should be looked 
for those of the more ordinary type such as 
ships, locomotives and motor cars, are not 
excluded, but readers who build models of 
this kind should endeavour to introduce 
some new method of construction or other 
novel feature. Every model submitted 
must be the competitor's own work. 

The Contest will be divided into two 




A, for com 




living in 



the British Isles, and B, for competitors 
living Overseas, There are no age limits, 
the contest being open to all Meccano 

enthusiasts, but the ages of competitors 

when 




will be taken into 

their entries are being judged. 

The prizes to be awarded in each 

section are as follows. First, Cheque 
for £2/2/-; Second. Cheque for £\/lf 



Third, Postal Order for 10/6. There also 

will be a number of consolation prizes. 

Readers should send in photographs 



or 




drawings of their mo 




to- 



gether with any explanations that may 
be necessary, although the latter should 
be made as brief as possible. Each com- 

name and 




petitor must write his 

address on each sheet of his entry 

on the back of 





photograph or 
drawing, and his age also must be stated. 
Envelopes containing entries should be 



addressed 



"Originality 




etihon, 



Meccano Ltd., Binns Road, Liverpool 13:" 
The closing date for Section A will 



be 30th April, and for the Overseas 
Section 31st August, 



"Simplicity" Contest Still Open 




"Simplicity" Contest announced 
last month is still open for entries, and 
the essential details are repeated here for 
the benefit of readers who did not see the 

original announcement and would like to 

send in an entry. In this Contest prizes 
will be awarded to model-builders who 
succeed in constructing the most ingen- 
ious models with the smallest possible 
number of parts consistent with a real- 
istic effect. 

When the model is completed the 
competitor should obtain either a photo- 
graph or a good drawing of it and then 
send this to "Simplicity" Model-building 

ntest, Meccano Ltd., Binns Road, 
Liverpool 13. 

Entries will be divided into two Sections 
as follows : Section A, for readers of all 
ages living in the British Isles, and Section 
B for Overseas readers of all aires. 




The prizes to be awarded in each Section 
are as follows: First, Cheque for ^2/2/-; 

Second, Cheque for/1/1/-; Third, Cheque 

10/6. There will also lie several con- 
ion awards. 







Section A will close for entries on 31st 

March, but Section B will remain open 
until 31st July. 



96 



THE 






Progress in Wartime 

In spite of the war, and the trials and 
adventures that it has brought with it, the 

Guild not only continues to hold its own, 

but is making remarkable progress, This is 
shown particularly by the number of en- 
rolments in recent months, all of which 

have been considerably above those for 




previous year, an 



d als 



so for 




of 







several years prior to the outbreak 
of hostilities, 
of new members who joined in January of 
this year is several hundred more than 

that of the last pre-war year, 1939, which 
in itself showed a great advance on the 
years immediately before it. 

The Club movement shows equally re- 

M m 

markable progress. There are many Clubs 
that have been compelled by blackout con- 
ditions and air raid warnings to shorten 
meetings, to reduce their number, or to 

change Club rooms, and there have been 
instances of actual loss by enemy action. 



Yet all are continuing undaunted, and 
members show greater keenness than ever 

when the opportunity for action is given 
them. In addition there is a formidable list 

of Clubs in process of formation, and 

peaceful conditions will bring a vast ex- 
tension of activities. Thus the Guild and 



Club mo vein e n t is 





itsel f 



in war 



;ions, and the coming of victory will 
greater opportunities than ever for 
Meccano bo vs. the engineers of to-morrow. 



Our Visitor Friends 



One Club that has seized a splendid op- 

port unity that the war has brought is the 
Exeter M.C, Many boys from London are 
now in Exeter, where they have found 

ge and a cordial welcome, and these 
have been invited to take part in the work 
of the Club, not merely as visitors, but as 





members, joining in every activity 



and even 
Kece 





official positions, 
the London members organised 
a special meeting, at which old Exeter 

members were entertained by them as if 

they were visitors. 

A pleasant feature of this association is 

that the London boys are never spoken of 



as 



"evacuees-" 



■■r — 

Instead they are 



■ • 



our 



visitor friends," and arc treated as if they 
have always lived in Lxeter and have been 

members of the Club for vears. As a result 
the London boys are really at home. In thi* 
way the Exeter M.C, is helping to spread 
the Guild spirit in new (quarters, and similar 

friendly action in other districts is sure to 
have far-reaching, effects when the war 

comes to an end. 

Model-Building with a Purpose 

In many Clubs March brings w 




it a 

m- ^ — - 

period of preparation for Exhibitions, Dis- 



* 



plays or Open Nights to mark the end of 
the Winter Sessions. These events are ad- 



mirable in 




they give 




of the 



Club an opportunity of seeing how members 
have been occupied during the dark days, 

and the displays that arc made provide 




Mrs. K, Franklin is Leader of the Brondesbury M.C, 
which was affiliated in May 1940, with Mr. K. Franklin 

as President. A good club room was secured, and 
meetings in it were greatly enjoyed* while football 

and cricket also were played. Evacuation gave rise 
to difficulties, but the club is being reorganised in new 

surroundings to meet existing circumstances, 

material on which to judge the value of 
Club life. For this reason every effort should 
be made to produce a really good im- 




in particular the material displayed must 

lirst class quality. Every Club shows 




models, and 





invana 




include 



splendid efforts, often of a novel type 



designed by in 




s themselves. An even 



better impression is produced if the models 



H 



themselves, large or small, fit into a scheme 
<>f some kind, and 1 qifg© all Leaders who 

are making preparations for such an event 
to think over this point very carefully. 

is not difficult to decide upon a 

scene into which a variety of models can be 

be 





introduced, and in this place 

found for small models constructed by 

younger members as wdl as for the larger 

and more impressive efforts of experienced 

mod el -builders. 

■ 

One advantage of this method is that a 

topical scene can he built up by providing 



models with a suitable background. Two 



good 



_ * ■». 



amp 







come 




the Ma viands 



(Western Australia) M.C., and are referred 
to to "Club Notes'* on the opposite page. 
One of these assemblies presented a contra- 
band station, and gave 



t unities 



fi u 






ion 






ship models of all sizes. The other repre- 

with a balloon barrage 



sen 







. 




ion 



. 



against dive bombing. 




Aeroplanes are favourite subjects for 

at the present time, and 
the selection of such a subject as this 
provides members with the opportunity 

they want for building miniatures of their 

favourite machines, both large and small. 
Other good suggestions are a seaport, 
which has the special advantage that a 

miniature railway can be introduced into 
the scene, and an engineering workshop 
fitted up with miniature machines. 



* 



The preparation of a scenic display of 
this kind involves a little more work than 

the mere arrangement of models on a bench. 

but the extra time and energy thus spent 
is amply repaid by the increased interest 
of members as well as visitors. Well-built 






' 



models create a good impression, but this 
is intensified many times if they are also 



well displayed. 

Proposed Clubs 

CHRisTcni'RCH- — »K. Shave, Tanglewnod. 

Albion Road, ("hristchurch, Hants. 
Croydon — Mr. A, Bula, 61, Shirley Road, 

Addiscombe, Croydon. 

Cu D WORTH— T. 




62 



Pontefract 



Road, Cud worth, Nr. Barnsley. 
Maidstone— R. Sutclifle, 66, College Road. 
Maidstone, Kent, 



Oxford — J. Smith, 55, Church Hill Road, 



Rose Hill, Oxford. 
Tordmorden — R, Cuntiffe, 



7, 



Major 



Street, Halifax Road, Todmorden, Lanes 



Proposed Branches 




in. Grange Koad 



Chester — J, A, 

West, Vicar's Cross, Chester. 

C rad lev Heath — C. A. Rrindle, 183, High 

Street, Cradley Heath. 
Hayes — C. Bodimcad, 7, Fourth Avenue. 

Mayes, Middlesex 

1 1 OX t — G . Blak el ey , 



o 



D 



• 




Street 



ChanterlaiuU Avenue, Hull. 




• x SUA M- 




P 



i 




on, 



*4 



Budlea," 

- 




Bath Hill East Keynsham, Nr. 

1 -ON don — 11. W. Skerratt, 10, Alroy Road, 

Finsbury Park, London N.4, 
New Bar net — A, Sweet man, YVaveney, 

Brookhill Road, New Barnet, Herts. 

New Milton — M. Bird, Kesthaven, New 



Milton, Hant 



s. 



S 1 1 k i- 1- 1 E i D— R . lulling, 6 , \Y in s ford R . -ad , 
Birlev Carr, Sheffield 6. 



Ta 




Stockport— 
New Mills, Stockport. 



r, 85, Spring 




■* 

* 







MECCANO MAGAZINE 




• ■' 




f 















<j ' i -Q 



Branch News 

Balky and District,— The time of mooting has been 
altered from Friday night to Saturday afternoon- The 

Branch Hornby- 1 >ii bio layout is built cm a plywood 

have- been 




K, 




se, and a station ami a turn table have- Wen con- 
structed for use on it. Track operations have been 
carried out regularly, and the use of Hornby-Dublo 
Electrically ^operated Points has increased the fun and 
fiivea rise to consider** I s le satisfaction. Secretary; j 
Ubdigkiinwii, IBl, Sootbill Lane, Bailey, York*. 

Southwell (Northamptoni, — Members of this Branch 
have been successful in carrying out full programmes. 
The line represents the track of the "Insk Mail*" 
with branches. Four sets of working plans have been 
arranged , and these are put into operation 
The Holyhead -Belfast service and the necessary local 
connections have been doubled r a new mail boat 
U TM Angtia" having been constructed for the pur* 

pose. The harbour at "Holyhead" is now too small 
for the traffic, and is to be enlarged. Other work to 
be carried out includes the extension of platforms at 
"Stafford," the enlargement of the station at "Chester" 
and a thorough overhaul of track. Chairman: Mr + J. 
Southwell, 127, The Drive, Northampton. 

Hornsea.— Interesting work has been carried out 
with a new layout, the main feature of which was 

the miming of "The Flying Scotsman" in miniature. 

Experience has indicated various improvements, such 
as the addition of an engine yard at one of the stations* 
and these have been carried out. At one meeting special 

attention was paid to goods traffic, shunting practice 

given to the younger members, known as 
"Apprentices," who "soon became really skilful. 

r« D. E. Parker, 8, Burton Road, Hornsea. 

^on, — Meetings have been devoted regularly 

to the'running of trains on the Branch layout. There 
have been several interesting accidents, but these are 
now fewer, partly because the track has been improved 
and partly because of the increasing skill of members. 
Signals and Points have been repaired and renewed 

where necessary, and the track is being extended. The 
next step is to introduce timetable working, 
G. W Ruffell, 10. Hinxhuret VVay, Lough* 





hton 





Dump Ion House School. 
was attended by 33 
themselves. A member of 

bv 



The Branch Exhibition 






rt who greatly 

the Branch began 

ings oy making a speech on the working of 
Hornby Electric Locomotives, after which operations 
were carried out on the special layout built for the 
purpose. A series of Branch photographs have been 
taken. More rolling stock, both Gauge "0 M and Horn 
Dublo, is now available. The track is being extended 
in order to accommodate these, and preparations are 
being made for a larger Exhibition than that already 
held. Secretary: J, P. Obutissier, Crichel House, Nr. 

YVixn borne, Dorset. 
Carmarthen. — Track operations have included the 

■ i i~ 




an 




Branc 









refreshments that were greatly appreciated. Secretary: 
J. D. Lewis, 7, Spilman Street, Carmarthen. 

Selly Oak Model Railway Club. — Members were 
entertained to tea by Mr. and Mrs. Hughes, Harborne, 

were played, The Branch 
". It will short Iv include a 



Interesting Lantern Lectures 
given, together with talks by the Leader. 



Hornsea Evacuee MX. 

have been 









winch various game* 
layout is now being exte 
terminal station 
a shed for seven loco- 
motives, Experiments 

are being carried out 

in Morse code sig* 
nailing between the 
control boards for 

various sections 
of the track. Secre- 
tary: C- C. Jones, 

12, Blackthorn Road, 

Bourn vilk , Birming- 
ham 3», 

Islington.— The 
Brain h has riot yet se- 
cured *i.n official room 
replace the one 
damaged by enemy 
action, but work con- 

tinues. refresh meats 
being kindly provided 
at each meeting. The 
Branch's steel track 
was preserved intact, 
together with station 







Special meetings have been devoted to Hornby Train 
operations, irid these have been very instructive and 
enjoyable* Club roll: 15, Leader: Mr* R. VV, Shooter, 
The 'Gowans, Cliff Road, Hornsea, E* Yorks. 



to 



buildings! and now 

that the evenings are 

er good p 

de with 





will 



is being maoe 
re p lace trie nts t wh ich 

be speeded up 
when a good Branch 
room is obtained. 

Stamp Collecting and 
Fretwork ace o 
activities that are 

on 
regularly. Leader: Mr. 

V; Miller, 541, Liverpool Road, London NJ 







The Exeter MX.'s Fourth Football Team, the members of which are chosen from the 
youngest boys in the club, with Mr, M. C. Hodder, Leader. Football has made good 
progress at Exeter during the past winter. Records also have been made in mod el- building 
and attendances at meetings, and an outstanding recent club event has been a presentation 

to Mr. Hodder to mark his completion of 21 years of Leadership. 



held 



the 



Club Notes 

Tynecastle School (Edinburgh) MX.— Members have 

els of all kinds, including 



Mi*m 



been busy constructing 
aeroplane models. These were displayed at a Guest 
Xight, to which friends and parents were invited! and 
aroused great interest, A special visit was made to an 
exhibition of model planes. Club roll: 20. Secretary: 
L Anderson, 28,. Moat Street, Edinburgh II- 
Acton MX. — Steady work continues on the new 

More 





an 




Uornbv 




Railway that is being constructed. 

sleepers have been laid clown, and 
an interesting discussion was held 
on the design of the eoods yard at 
"Weatherbridgc." A Meccano model 
of an ash handling plant has been 
commenced, and this is to be in- 
stalled on the layout. The monthly 
Film Shows given by the secretary 
continue to be well supported, and 
an attractive Lecture, illustrated by 
maps and diagrams, has been given 



Plymouth MX. — Meetings are being held at 
home of Mr. W. J, Ellis, formerly Leader, who is now 
in the Army f the intended meeting place having been 

damaged by an incendiary bomb* The programme 
consists of operations on Mr. Ellis's model railway, 
which is being repaired and kept in good order, makin 

twork models and building model aeroplan 
ships, in addition to Meccano model-building. This 
work is being done under the guidance of Mr, C. J. 

the new Leader. Club roll: 120* Secretary: 
A- E. Miller, 21, Hamilton Gardens, Mutley, Plymouth. 

Hornsea HX»— Excellent work continues to be 
done by the officials and members of the Club. Mr, 
A. lawn's Lectures on scientific topics have included 
one on "Sulphuric Acid," and Mr. R. W* Shooter, 

f has completed a series of talks on "Electricity" 





Range-finders, mines, the Navy and aeroplanes have 
been the subjects for other interesting talks, The 
working of cameras and projectors for cinematograph 
work have been explained, and mem hers have enjoyed 
ames as well as operations on the Club's Hornby 

; P. Richard* 




as operations 
leetric Railway, Club roll: 21- Seer 




son, 14, 




ven or 




Hornsea, 






AUSTRALIA 




. 



Ctevedon 
Club roll 
Simmons, 
Road, Acton, 



and 
14. 

37. 




Members of the Martimvhite (Guildford) Branch, No. 402, of the H.RX. 

Chairman, is seated in the centre, with T. M, White, 

The Branch was incorporated in October 1940, 

stud of 14 locomotives. Good 




Mr 



P* Martin, 

his 



secretary, on his right. 

and now possesses a good layout and a 

constructional work is carried out, and interesting operations arc planned 



and put into practice on Track Nights. 





running of milk "Specials," express goods trains and 

Array "SpeOftls^* In addition a wartime "Cheltenham 

Ivet" has been run in war conditions, with 
lacked out. Members have practised the use of the 
switchboard and of various types of track formation 
incorporated in the layout, and new members have 
been given training in running operations. Chemical 
experiments have been continued, small prizes being 

awarded to the members who obtained the best results. 
The usual games have been played and the Branch's 
first birthdav was celebrated by a Film Show, for 
which Mr. R, Lewis, Chairman, kindly 




on "The Weston, 

Ptrrttshead Railway." 

S* W. 

Derwei it water 

don VV.3. 

Exeter MX. — A review of progress 
during 19411 shows that there was 
a record attendance, and 331 ex- 
cellent Meccano models were built 
by members. A handsome clock was 
presented to Mr. M. C. Hodder, 
Leader, to mark the completion of 
21 years of office. The presentation 

was made on behalf of the members 
by Mr, II. W; Causley, President, 

The Club honours list was longer 
than ever, and the number of speeches 

by me tube is at the annual 

Christinas meeting also was a record. 

An interesting innovation is the 
formation of a Club for boys from 

London who have been c vacua ltd 
to Exeter. This is run in association 

with the existing Bxcttr Club, and 
has proved very successful. A special Christmas meet- 
ing was held for these members, who organised a 
programme and entertained the Exeter members as if 
they were visitors. Club roll: 100. Secretary: A. E. 

Davie, 4, Roseland Crescent, Heavitiec, Exeter, 

Coloured Mission (Cardiff) M.C.— While the weather 
was good excursions were made regularly on Saturday 
afternoons, groups of members being taken by Mr. 

IX H. Binstead, secretary, in his ear to country places, 
where sanies were enjoyed. Plans for resuming indoors 
are now being made. Club roll: 20. Secretary: D. H. 
Binstead, 37, Penhill Road Cardiff. 



May lands 
activity in 

such as an 
and others 






(Perth) M.C.— There has been 
model* building, excellent large 



intense 
models 





ambulance, flying boats, harbour cranes 

rapidly completed. Outdoor meetings 
have included assembly on the beach for swimming, 
and rambling and hiking in the heart of the Darling 

about 17 miles from Perth, The Reserve 

Club has taken part in these outdoor events. The 
chief aim now is to rebuild the Club room, and special 
efforts are being made in order to raise the necessary 
sum. A Shooting Gallery has been laid out, and 
members of the Club and Reserves are becoming 

skilful marksmen. At the Factions Exhibition the 
Green-Gold Paction won the prize with an assembly 

of models to represent a Contraband Station, complete 
with cargo vessels, destroyers and patrol boats, and 
light cruisers bringing in suspicious neutral ships* 

Ihe Red-Bhie Faction presented an Air Port, with a 

balloon barrage, and this too was a splendid effort. 
Club roll: 34. Secretary: \\\ Petersen, 1, Warne Street. 
May lands, Perth, Western Australia. 






MALTA 



Lasallian M.C. 



and 



-Activities have been resumed 
several new members have joined. Model building is 
pursued with greater enthusiasm than ever. Models 
of war interest were called for in a special contest. 
and the majority of entries represented ships of the 
Royal Navy, Rev. Brn. Walter Joseph, F.S.C., 
formerly Hector of the College and a great friend of 
the Club, has given a very interesting Lecture and 
presented two pairs of cage birds, and Mr* j. Booker 
has lent a projector and films for a Cinema Display* 
Football and Table Tennis continue and Air Rifle 
Shooting has been taken up. Club roll: 36. Secretary: 
A. Caruana, St, George's Street, Gzira, Malta, 






98 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 








Our Bargain "Discount" Approvals contain a fine range of picked 
Modern and New Tssues, Pictorials and Commemorative*, etc, from 

1d.-6d* each, less a generous discount. Send to-day with confidence. 



- 

1 



Approvals or 







Ms are post free, and we do NOT send again 



E AS I LY APPROVAL SELECTIONS from STANLEY GIBBONS 

__ _ " . _ . . < easily the finest you can get. We invite you to 

THE DEjT compare them with others. Do so. and you will learn 

inCAl CftD for yourself that here are the selections you've always 

BLACK"" OUT proud to own. Remember, there are many scamps at 



wanted to see — fine, attractive stamps you 



NIGHTS 

WITH YOUR 

STAMP ALBUM 



only a penny or a few pence each on every sheet. 

WRITE TO-DAY to 

STANLEY GIBBONS LTD., DEPT. S.I5 

34/38, LONDON ROAD, ST. ALBANS, HERTS. 



unless requested. State whether you want British Colonials, 

Foreign or both. POSTAL BUSINESS ONLY 

THE BIRKDALE STAMP CO. (P.T.S.), 

Dept. M t 104, Liverpool Road r Southport, Lanes, 









and I Canadian "Royal 
Visit" 1939 and 2 Indian 

Silver Jubilees 1935* This 
gill will be sent with approval books containing stamps from id* A good discount 
is allowed and a list is sent (including complete Coronation sets and Jubilees) 
which may be obtained free by further purchases. Please send 3d. for postage. 

racket without approvals yd* po*t tree. 
C. A, RUSH, 8, BIRLEY ROAD, WHETSTONE, LONDON N,20 

















Which countries have been devastated by enemy action? Learn now, by applying 
for our free packet of stamps from the countries involved which we send to all 
persons requesting our famous Approval Sheets and enclosing 3d, to cover cost 

of postage. Offer is for 30 days, abroad 60 days. 

Dept. 347, ERMNGTQN & MARTIN, SOUTH HACKNEY. LONDON E.9. Est. 1880 



QPFTI Al flFFFP CORONATIONS complete 202 values, Mint 32f6. Used 42/6. 
Or LOIHL urrcn Mmt Crown Colonies 15/-. Dominions 20/- 



Crown Colonies, mint or u&ed 6d. 

li«. PACKETS-SOOdnf 



SILVER JUBILEES 




_ c sets 
Ask for our current price 
British Colonials9i9, 50ditf. Air Mail stamps 2/6. 50 stamps 
of Invaded Countries 9d. MINIATURE SHEETS MINT-Crechoslovakia Praga 1/., 
Czechoslovakia Bratislava Idd- Jugoslavia 2etib 1/6. Costa Rich 5d« Russia Pushkin 

l/- f Arch* Congress 1J3* Po&ta^e extra on orders under 10/^ Cash with order. 
A- LANG, Philatelist, 9 f CHARLES II STREET, ST. JAMES'S, S.W.I 



SEVENOAKS SPECIAL' Packets Europe \';X?-m*3i 

75 Austria, 45 Bavaria, 65 Belgium, 35 Bulgaria, 40 Czechoslovakia, 45 Denmark, 
20 Estonia, 35 Finland, 90 France, 85 Germany, 36 Gt. Britain, 45 Greece* 50 Holland 
80 Hungary, 50 Italy, 45 Jugo-Slayia* 35 Turkey, 18 Latvia, 18 Lithuania, 25 Luxem* 

12 Monaco, 35 Norway, 65 Poland, 45 Portugal, 35 Roumania, 35 Russia. 

-}5 Spain, 45 Sweden* 45 Switzerland. 



■ * 



urg 




ED HARLOW. B.P.A 



133, BRADBOURNE VALE, SEVENOAKS, Kent 




PACKET 



contains 



INDIA 



36 air, triangular, and stamps with aeroplanes on, etc— Z LII3BRIA triangular (with 
aeroplane}, usually sold at 7cL; NIGERIA (Geo. VI); COSTA-RICA tnanpular (fishl; URUGUAY 
(mail tram , ROUMANIA (Carol): 8 CANADA la fine set meludinR large Royal Visit pictorial): 
I TANGANYIKA; 3 PALESTINE (pictorials}; 6 BRAZIL (including airpost snd aeroplane design): 5 U.S.A. 
(obsolete); 2 JAVA; COSTA-RICA (Exhibition tnanglcl and MOROCCO. LARGE PICTORIAL; Peru New Issue; 
GERMANY (airpost); COLHiN (large) and IRAQ.— Price 5id„ postage 2|d. extra, abroad 3Jd.extra. Money back if 
you are not satisfied. Applicants (or approvals receive 8 Peru FREE (caraiogued at 9d.) and in addition, those sending 
addresses of ,tamp collecting inends get an additional set of 4 GEORGIA. FOR EVERY PACKET SOLD 1 AM 

GIVING THE PROFIT TO THE "SPITFIRE FUND," SO YOU WILL BE HELPING TO WIN THE WAR. 

BARGAINS— 100 B. Colonials I/-; 6 Triangular 7d.; 18 Georgia 10d.; 20 Rhodesia 1/2; H new Geo. VI III, 





H. C. WATK.NS, 







Importer (M.M. Dept.), Granville Road, BARNET 



THE ARMY, NAVY 



& 



AIR FORCE PKT 



FR 









The historic stamp illustrated 

should be in every collection. 

It commemorates the Aus- 

thc Army. 

and the 




Forces, 
Air Force 



inn 

Navy, 

Nursing Service. This packet 
of 26 varieties contains other 
Austral i an stamps (Father, Son 
and Queen Elizabeth)* Also 
included are stamps from 
Csecho-Slovakia, sets of 

BELGIUM and France. Can- 
ada, JAPAN, map issue, un- 
used German, and many others. Finally 
beautiful pictorial mint stamp from MOZAM- 
BIQUE depicting a Giraffe. ABSOLUTELY 
FREE. Just send lid. for postage and request 

approvals. 

8ROPKEBFERS-Send for flails of liver shop packets. 

Quick s files, large profits* 

LTD. (MM), LIVERPOOL 3 



• 





• 






SENSATIONAL FREE GIFT OFFER. ADD this wonderful packet of many lovely stamps to YOUR collection 
ABSOLUTELY FREE. Whether old or new collector, you should send NOW for this valuable MARCH GIFT. 

It includes NEW ISSUES; PICTORIALS: COLONIALS; ZOOLOGICAL; C0MMEM0RATIVES & WAR ISSUES and 

contains lovely pictorial BERMUDA Ship Stamp; SAMOA (Express)? EGYPT (Investiture); SWEDEN (Adolf); 

pictorial "Peace" stamp or FRANCE: DENMARK (Warship); MOZAMBIQUE (Poem Stamp); NEGRI SEMBILAN 

(Crest): TRAVANCORE (Shell): sets of INDIAN and CANADIAN; PORTUGAL (Reaper)? U.S.A. (President); 

GREECE (Athens Church); NORWAY (Armorial); HOLLAND (Wilhelmina); PERAK (Eastern Ruler); 

SELANS0R (Eastern Temple); AUSTRALIA (Animals); STRAITS and pictorial Biblical PALESTINE. Send 

us 3d. stamps to cover postage and receive nil this marvellous collection FREE, together with our Famous 

Bargain Approvals. 



WINDSOR STAMP 



CO. 



(DEPT. 



M), 



U C K FIELD 






SUSSEX 



L1SBURN & T0WNSEND 



MINT SILVER JUBI 




ES 










WONDERFUL 1941 OFFER 

NEW ISSUES AND NOVELTIES 




including Csecho-Slovakia (Masarylc), Denmark, Dominica K.G.YI, Greece 
(Charity, Queen* Olga and Sophia), Jugo-SIavia (late King Alexander}. 

Morocco Agencies (Id. black CentenaryL Turkey (G.P.G* Constantinople). 
1 will send this gift absolutely free to all scamp collectors sending 2id. pdstage. 

C. P. KEEF, WILLINCDON EASTBOURNE 



Australia 2d. 4d. each, 3d. 1/- eiich; Barbados lid. 4i- 
each; Canada lc. 2d. each, 2c. 4d. each; Cayman Is. 
2£d.1/6 each; Ceylon 6c.4d.cach, 9c. 1/-cach; Cyprus 
| P .3d. each; Falkland U.2Jd. 1/-cach; Ot. Britain 2|d. 
iy- each; Gambia !4d. 4d. each; Hong Kong 5c. 4d. 
each; India Ua. 6d. each; Malra Id. 2d. each, 2*d. 1/6 
each; Nauru I id.4d.each. 2d, 8d.each; Newfoundland 
4c. 6d. each, 5c- 1/6 each; St. Helena lid.6d.each; Sey- 
elles6c.4d.cach; Sierra Leone Id. 3d. each. Post extra. 

HARROWVtN (MM), 29. Garners Close, NORWICH 




CARRY ON, STAMP COLLECTORS! 

Send me a postcard for 50 Stamps tree, including 

GREECE. Jugo-Slav.. Dominica, Malta, Sudan, 

Malaya, W, Africa, ere, to applicants for my famous 

id. Stamps and cheap sets. Without approvals 9d. 

S, M. FLEMING. 52, WHITCHURCH ROAD, CHESTER 



THE FIRST STAMP EVER ISSUED 



(British 1840 Penny Black) for P.O. 4J 6! Iris guaranteed 
genuine in every re&pecr. Irs companion stamp (1840 

2d. blue! lor a further 6/9 {cut. 17/6! Other "Classics" 

which every collector should have arc ihe Cape of Good 

Hone Triangulars; we offer Id* rose (cat. 4QM tor 12/6; 

4d. blue (cat, L5M for 5/»; and fid. pale lilac (cat, 40/-} 
at 15/-- Superb approvals of any country against sip- 
proved English References or a deposit* Full Lists Free. 

MORRIS & CO. (Dept. M>. Somereotes, Derbyshire 



\ 



HOSPITAL STAMPS 






100 



DIFFERENT STAMPS 

to applicants for id. approvals. 



FREE 



COX, 17, 5TONELEIGH PARK ROAD, EWELI. 



lected from 



Coll 



3 



n 



Colon 



i 



ons 



ospi 



envc 



ECRETARY 



emori 



' 



capita 

roval $ 



LONDON 



m ou 



sent 



limit 
request. 



nutn 



BUY 

Approvals for all collectors* Please state interests* 







& 




GREY, 






9 



ROSEMARY AVENUE 
HOUNSLOW 



For other Stamp 




ements see page xi 



? 






- 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



99 



*P 







* 







t 




meet new conditions arising out of the war. 



Tin 



N e w f < ) u i) d 1 an d Is" o ve m 




1 939 



provisional, the overprinted Royal Visit 
issue, was the first war stamp of the present 



conflict. It was produced to meet a 



shot' 




&e 



of 



of supplies in consequence 
in the arrival of new shipments. 

Another interesting provisional comes from 






mps 



are 



Wor 




Collecting 






XG illustrates more vividly the 
simple truth that great events arc best 

portrayed in the page:* of a stamp album 
than the fact that 3,on<j special stamp: 



none of these stamp© has readied Britain, 
although we know oi one small 

ment that is on ite 

illustrate 



consign 



British stamps overprinted for use in the German 
Colonies of Nauru and German East Africa 





1 



issues ap 

1914-18. The war 



uu ring 



the (treat War of 



Germany has 




wav. 



earh 



and we hope to 



issue. 




mps of the 






m ps 




struggle are already appearing, and in days 
to come thev will provide an absorbing 



picture of this second World War. 

War stamps may be divided into four 



use in Poland, and has compelled u change 

of design in Holland; but there is no news 

of any alterations in 



the Faroe 
of 

Norm all* 





the Great War. 



now in 





occu 




ion 



is a preventive measure. 
Faroes use the stamps of 









ses 



occupation 






main 

charity 

miscellaneous provisionals 

tion stamps are 





of the 
remaining occupied countries other than 
Prance. In France a new issue is projected, 



Denmark, hut of course, new supplies of 

stamps are not likely to 





while Germany 

plies of the 20 

ex ha us 







provisionally 

military commanders on taking 

over enemy territory. 
such as Red 

are 

value to raise funds for war 




v issues. 

Cross or Distress Relief 

at a premium on 




charities in the 



bellig* 




countries 



and elsewhere. War Tax issues usually 



consist of 



reg u 1 a r 



issues overprint 




to denote increased postal charges as 

national war taxation, and 
an eons provisional issues are 

arising 




Denmark. 



ore value having become 
following an increase in the 



postal rate from 15 ore to 20 ore in 




July last, 




15 ore value has been 



surcharged to meet the shortage. A 

surcharged stamp 




specimen of 

was reproduced in the January 1941 

"j\LM\" accompanied by an unusual 
advertising postmark. 



It is highly unlikely that this war 




will produce so great a 

issues as did the last war. 

great part of the 1914-18 issues were 




needed 




u se i n 








to meet s 
out of war conditions 

Such stamps appeared in every one of the 
belligerent countries during the last war, 
and almost certainly they will recur many 
times in all of them "in this war. And again, 

as in the last war, collectors in the countries 

concerned will find it almost impossible to 

sjieci- 
mens of the 



Three occupation stamps of 1914-18. The first was issued by Germany 
for use in Belgium, and the other two are German Colonials overprinted 
by the Allies for use in the Cameroons and Marshall Islands. 



conquered 




issues 



German colonies, and sepa 

were adopted for each Colony as it 






but for the present France and the 



was 




up 



r i 



Usually the stamps 



other 



countries continue to 



use 



the 



issues on sale at the time of the German 

occu 




f 



The Baltic States taken under the 
protection" of Kussia also continue to 





their old 







has ali t 



btawp 



other side's is- 

sues until the 

war is oven 



with 
21." 





we learn from 



nam a 



of the Colon v itself were overprinted 

with suitable wording to denote the 

new situation. Thus it is probable that 
readers who set out to make a coJ lection 
of issues of the present war will not find 

making to© heavy an in- 



th 



eir pure 









issued various current stamps 

"L.T.S.R,— 1940 VII 



road into their pocket money. 

There are certain forms of war stamps 

that all can obtain without cost, however. 





ens 
issues f n nn 

German-occu- 



an overprint 
to mark its new status as a republic 

within the Soviet Union. 

There have been two Allied 
issues, the first appearing in France 
February last in aid of soldiers' comforts 

funds. The other is the Australian Imperial 



As our readers 





British units 



on active service, and Naval units afloat 






Fore e co m me 1 1 n >rati v e i $s u c d 



witl 



i 



a 



may find their 



for Red Cross Funds, Both of 



t o 

v ia 



1 




A 1918 war charity issue from 

the Bahamas, 



w a y 

Britain 

n e u t r a 

countries, 
it certainly 

will not be 

to 
unused 



premium 

have already been illustrated 

MM." 

the Allies side there 




* - 

m 



have the privilege of free postage, a frank 
applied in the unit headquarters serving 
to carry the letter home. Many of these 
franks are simple censor marks, often 
accompanied by a Naval or Army Post 
Office marking. The inclusion of these in a 
war stamp collection is quite permissible. 



although 




are n 




adhesives. 



have 



been 







pro* 





specimens. War stamps, 
worth collecting immediately they appear. 
They are rarely used in large quantities, and 
as soon as the war is over there will be a 
rush from collectors 



visional issues, and one at 
least with an overprint to 

vary the rate in consequence 

* ft .- -m , * * 

of rev 

This was 

Health issue 





ces 



Zealand 

October 

> ■ > 



seeking 




hitherto unobtainable. Prices therefore 
rise, in some cases to high levels, and those 

who care to sell may make substantial profits. 
So far only one series of " 



1939, which appeared with 

the originally intended 

values of ^d. and Id. blotted 
out and replaced by new 
values Id. and 2d. This 

be called 





occ u { 

has been issued on the Allied side. 
Greece's issue for the conqu 

area of Albania. At the time of writing. 




stamp can 

a provisional, however. It 




is an 




case of a charity 





appearing 



with 



a 



altered design to 



Examples of War Tax stamp issues. The British Honduras issue was given & 
moire background, introduced so that the stamps could be identified and 

demonetized should they fall into enemy hands. 













THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



The Lord Baden-Powell Portrait Stamp 
With the death of Lord Baden -Powell 

■ 

we have lost the central figure of the story 
of one of the most remarkable stamp 
issues that the British Empire can boast. 
During the Boer War, the town of Mafeking 
was besieged 
1899 





the Boers from October 



1900. The 




of 



the town naturally desired to communicate 
with their friends outside, but during the 

first weeks of the siege the town was so 
closely beset that no letters could be 



smuggled through the enemy lines. Later, 
when Lord Roberts had relieved Kimberlev 
and was pressing forward to Pretoria, the 
Boers were compelled to withdraw some 

of their troops and as a result native 



runners carrying letters were able to make 
their way through gaps in their lines. 

.Mails were sent 
out regularly, 

bearing first 

e 





stamps of 

Colony, British 
Bechuanaland 



and 



t h c 



Be chuanaland 

Protectorate, 

over-printed 
wi 1 1 1 t he wo r d s 



i* 










Ala/eking" and 

Besieged,'* and 
surcharged to meet the high postal charges 
involved in paying the runners in aceor- 

with the risks they ran. 
The demand for a 3d. value was so great 
that it was thought desirable to have a 

special stamp designed for production in 
the town. Captain Greener, who was Chief 
Paymaster d uring the siege, was responsible 
for the design, and his proposal that this 
should consist of a portrait of 

Baden-Powell, as he then was, commander 
of the British Forces in the town, met with 
considerable opposition from the Colonel, 
who felt that such a design would be con- 
sidered improper. Ultimately the Colonel 
gave way under further pressure from his 

, and the stamp shown here was pro- 





duced. Baden-Powell's fears were more 

■ 

than justified, for when the stamps reached 
England a storm of criticism was aroused 
and the Queen 
herself expressed 
considerable dis- 
pleasure. It was 






great lead 



he a! 

blame 



owed t he 



w 




to 
h 



rest 

lself, 



nd not for many 



after did 
ith of 




years 

the tr 

incident come to 
light. 








e 







is 



trated on this page, and we reproduce 

ler of the special stamps produced 



in Maf eking, the Id. local post that did 
duty for correspondence posted by the 
defenders to their relatives and friends in 
the area outlying the forts. These 



were not permitted to 




the 




neither were the defenders allowed outside 
to visit. All communication had to be by 



letter, 



d 




en i n g at 5 



ssengers on bicv 



out from 





forts to the outlying points. The messengers 

were boys from a Cadet Corps 
to act as orderlies during the siege, and 
in token of appreciation of their good work, 
one of their number, Sergt. -Major Good- 






yea 
the 



was 




portr 




mp 







■p 



an 





on New Issues 



Bermuda War Provisional 



The Bermuda provisional 




rated on 



this page is the latest addition to the list 
of British war stamps. It appears in con- 
sequence of a wartime change in postal 

rates and delay in the ar- 



over two stamps, a pair being necessary to 

show the full wording, and the overprint 

is applied horizontally in some cases, 
vertically in others. 

Some confirmation of the news of a new 

issue in occupied France is also available. 



This is said to be 



riv 



al of 



new supplies. The 



stamp is the current Id. 
issue, and the surcharge has 

applied locally with 
typeset lettering. Varieties 




abound 





settings, 
distinct 




in 

are two 

differences in tne spacing 
between the words "Half 

Penny'* and the can 
crosses, and broken 
abound. We mention these 

■ 

features so that readers may 
be on their guard against 

paying fancy prices for 



i"8 
letters 




T 




are as com- 



mon as the perfect specimen. 
Incidentally, the issue is 




\ 




a 



50 fr. 



commemorating the 



e> 



1914-18 war air ace Guy- 
nemer, whose portrait 
appears on the stamp. The 



inscription 



a 



K . F. * ' 



[Re 



jmhlique Francaise) definite- 

appears. France has never 

iss u ed a com - 

■ 




previously 
memorative 



of so 





high 



a 



ce value. 



Free French Colonial Issue 












The French Cameroons 



have 



signified 




ad- 



an 




e xam 







of 



A Turkish issue overprinted after 

Ihe capture of Mesopotamia 



how war stamps shoot up in price. Prices 
as high as 3/- are being paid by those who 

are anxious lest they should fail to obtain 
a copy. Other dealers are charging various 
prices and the lowest we know is 9<\., which 



herence to the Free French 
movement by overprinting 
their current series of stamps 
with the inscription, in three 
1 i nesij "Cameroim. I ; rm i cms . 
27.8.40/* The War Charity issue current 
in the Colony has also been over-printed. 

The numbers of stamps so issued is very 
small, we understand: less than 5,000 of 



certain of the values has been issued. 



at the 




time is not unfair, since 



supplies are small and likely to be exhausted 
quickly, 

■a 

American Centenaries 





on a 





A set of five stamps is to be issued 
shortly in Chile to commemorate the fourth 

centenary of the founding of Santiago, the 



capital city. Four of the designs will show 
portraits of the orig 



i 





Fathers 



while the fifth will bear a symbolical design 



depicting the dev 

four centuries. 




merit of the city over 



Another forthcoming South American 

Bra /, i 1 ia n iss u e to 



«reat 



»*' 




in the story of 
These are 




commemorative is 
celebrate two 

1/ >t t uguese independence 

800th anniversary of Alfonso's wresting of 
the country 's sovereignty from Spain in 
1140, and the 300th anniversary 



It wo- 
uld be 
inter- 
esting 

to k now 

why 

Cuba 

waited 
until 

Novem- 
b e r 

before is- 
suing its 

Stamp 
Cen ten- 




A second British occupation overprint 

from Mesopotamia* 




setting up of a provisional govern rne 

Archbishop Da Cunha, who later sue 

in placing King John IV on the 

The dates 1140, 1640 and 1940 are shown 




arv Commemorative. Now that it 
appeared it proves to be a very interesting 
specimen, for it is a case of a stamp illus- 




are illustrated 



a stamp, Actuallv tlm< 




in the design of the stamps, which con 



Penny Black, 





s 




of 



s 
design in- 
the British 






Cuban stamp of 




s prineipa 




of tl 



to re- 



production of a painting of 
the scene at the acclamation 
of King John. 

A Provisional Issue in 
Occupied France 

J u st as we go to p r ess, we 

learn from an American 
source that 

when the 




in June, 




ans 
Northern France and occu 






pied the coast ports, they 

overprinted a small supply 

not more than 2,000 in 
number — of the 50c. stamps 
of France with a very crude 

- 

hand stamp bearing wording that can ju 

be identified as reading: "Occupied Territo 









the Spanish regime, and the first stamp of 

Republican Cuba. 

Other features of the 

are a map 

a portrait of 

Hill, as well as the National 

Arms and the centenarv 
dates, 1 840- 1 940. The stam j> 
looks much better than One 
would expect in so crowded 

and it can be 



a 





ure 



described as a 

historical treatise in one 

small page. 






* 



* 



a 



i 



ory 



of Northern France/' The wording is spread 



The 1 1th series of Balkan 
Olympic Games, held in 
Turkey last autumn, were 
celebrated by the issue of four stamps as 

follows: — 3 k,, runner; 6 k., pole -jumper; 
8k., hurdler; 10k., discus thrower. 





t 



• 














MECCANO MAGAZINE 



101 




Famous 



Diese 



Electric 





in 



Th 




Chi 






icago an 




Nor 





\\ 



400 



// 






HE finest 





of 

Western 




t* 



400 



M 



the fiver 





runs 



tween Chicago and the twin cities of 





a 

1 1 



St. Paul and Minneapolis, 
steam-hauled train the "400 
achieved fame by a timed rim at an 
average speed of 75.8 m.p.h. between 
Chicago and Racine, a distance of 
61 .9 miles. This was the highest speed 




in 



daily 










runs 




summer in 





i 









there it was equalled 



other 




-hauled train 




and 
one 








even more 



September 1939 



when Diesel power replaced steam. 
A new and ultra-modern streamlined 
train was then put into service, and 




w 



so 





during the 
first month of its working more than 
half as many passengers again travel- 




troduccd to haul the train. Each 

consists of two units, each of 

in turn is itself a complete 2,000 h.p. 








be operated i 

demanded. 




locomotive that could 
endently if occasion 







locomotives 
of a top speed of 117 m.p.h. 
power for the two motors comes from 
four 6< mi- volt direct current genera- 

the Diesel engines, 



tors 




wheels. 




through 



1 




driving 
large number of 



driving wheels that gives the loco- 
motives 
heavy 
easily. 
The controls of the locomotives are 




simpler 




thos 






of an 




motor car, and it actual lv takes less 



effort on the 





of the driver to 



by them 



or stop one of the trains hauled 

_ * 




is required to start or 



stop a car. To aid the driver, and in 

the interests of safetv. automatic 

.1 e- 

f rosters and sun visors are provided, 





automatic 



The 




I ! 



as the 



springing ot 
"400' 



* 



attention if the 






requires 



a iaver of cork, and the sub- 
is of aluminium. The 






prevented from 






In the new 



locomotives four hydraulic shock 

coupled with carefuliy- 



are rubber-cushioned and 
can be moved to allow passengers to 

Windows are 




tli 



e 



loco- 




springs 



on 





are 






The effect of this equipment is 



n 





r to 










up 




down 



recline at any 

of glare- pro of 
motives, 

sprung. On 

dining coaches stabilising levers are 






bogies 




motion of the locomotive but also to 



employed to 




the v 




level 







The streamlined "400'\ the crack train of the Chicago and North Western Railway, sweeping out of Chicago on 
its maiden run as a Diesel-electric train. Photograph by courtesy of the Chicago and North Western Railway. 



essen motion from 




to side. 





Each unit carries 1,100 gallons of 

1 ,200 



™ A ^i rounding curves, so that *..~ 
dining tables are kept in equilibrium. 



train heatint 






w 






last 




in 




train, 





allons of fuel oil, With a full supply 
of fuel, boiler water and sand the 
total weight of a two-unit locomotive 

is nearly 270 tons. The length is 
140 ft., 



parlour-observation 












special 






in the form 
into the 







a 
a 








■ •* 




13 ft. 11 in, above rail 



above 
fast are we gob 



windows. 



ti 



How 






>" 



level and width 9 ft. 10 in, 
With the new locomotives 




an 




sisting 




new streamlined train, con 
of a baggage- tavern co 

four 




that travellers on swift 
ask. Passengers in 

"400" have no n 

lat 








people, a 56-seat 



they can see 

speed of the train by merely glancin 



and there is an emergency control dining car, two 

pedal, on which the driver must press " accommodating 29 passengers 






at a 
thrill 



invariably 




in order to keep his train in motion. 
Alternatively he must press down on 
the control lever, and in each case the 
train is brought automatically to a 
stop if the pressure is released. 



and 

a parlour-observation coach seating 
26 people. 

All the new "400" cars are of steel 




a 






reaches 

to- 



80 m.p.h., 

wards 100 m.p.h., a speed that has 



been exceeded on several occasion 
A second speedometer is installed in 



construction. 



The 



flooring 



is 



of 





aluminium with 



what is 



is a 













tavern car, which 
lounge. 





MECCANO MAGAZINE 




With 




Good 





Horn 




Dubl 



Train Running 



an 




O 



Rai 







we 




running 



of 




to 

Trains 



th 



e 







-i 







on 



vans \v 




be 






Hornby-Dublo railways. Train opera- 
tion is always of interest, and 

train running is particularly good fun 







o wi n a 



is 





of stock 




be several 

yards. On 

wi t h 




different points as there will 

J. 




inns with 





con 





a 



sing 






numerous items of 

are connected witJi 
or goods side of miniature 

wo r k . 

In recent articles we 
mentioned the di fir rent 
the Hornby-Dublo 




re are 

XSt 

f reigh t 

lwav 



le yard stops will 



have to be made at the one point on 
successive circuits of the track 




s 










a matter of fact this 
a satisfactory 




< 



fc> 



rive 











already 

of 

and t he- 





road 
train re-mars 
extent. The 



the 

■ 

have to be sorted out of 
s each time and the 



. 




«■( 




a 





type of trains for which they can 




i 



e 



of 

the train at the same spot will not 





A train of vans passing a yard where coal traffic is handled. Hornby Imitation Coal is here used tor loading ihe wagons. 



used. In the ordinary way trains 
are assembled in the sidings together 

with the Brake Van to complete the 

. They then make various 

journeys over the layout and in the 



then be noticed very much. 
The journey made by the complete 





to 



can be of any length 



the 




es 



of 



the 




Sometimes on«- rircuit of a continuous 



case 



of 



the 



a ver age 



continuous 





run into 




same 







considered to re 

• ■ 

and so 





a 




wagons 



are 



disposed of by shunting them along- 
side the Goods Station platform and 



turns round the track are made until 
the required f< 




ance" is covered, 



the engine returns to its depot. 

la,/ J 

An alternative 



according to the real 



s 




ons 






one 




to be 

variations can be 




that reproduces actual working more 

closel 



v 



is 




r 



the 



engine 



to come 



from the shed and to run licht to the 











siding, or road in the group of sidings, 

the Brake Van is usually 
kept. In most real shunting yards 
there is a road reserved for the 




programme of this sort. 



eren t 






is almost unlimited. 



lgths 
-up of the train can 

over and over again so 
to be had in this way 



storage of these vehicles. The engine 

couples up to the 



sidin 






Generally 

paralle] to one another 





arranged 

the 




takes it "down the line/' picking up 



main line, each si 
in turn from a 




road diverging 





rane 




various v 




■^# 



at 





a respectable train is 




off from the main one. This is 



a 





arrangement when the 



chief 

the 





the 



• 

>i 








is for 






storage 



of rolling stock and it 




gives a 
effect. Where much 




e 



be 

advantage 







re ver 





lat each time a string 



of wagons is drawn 







of one of 




roads the engine 

w out on to 
the 









the sidings 

necessarily 

main line, with the possibility of 

upsetting the operation of main line 

per- 
mits, the arrangement of a shunting 



trains. To avoid this, if 




n 




or s 




is an advantage. 




s 



invariably tikes the form of a dead 
end road, arranged on the opposite 

side of the branch track 
the sidings 




om 




s 







of 
ring out on to the main line, 
and thus occupving a section with 
consequent delay to main line traffic, 

the engine 




is shunting in the 

sidings draws into the shunting spur. 

On an cleetricallv-opcrated layout 

this allows the sidings as a complete 

unit to be 

main 






separate 
Isolating Rail 




inserted between the Points 



from th 




main 



line 




their 



own Transformer 



sidings and those serving the < 
ing spur. The sidings can then have 

and 

provide 

the 

Possibly a 
1 will be 



a sepai ate Controller 








t he 
operations in 



of 



carr 



the 



Dublo Transformer 
employed for the 




cr 





* 



the mam 



line 



if 




-tracked, being fed 
from a Dublo Transformer No. 2, 






With a single main 





mam 




vever 

Transformer can be used 

and the 
nt control 

.of a 

circuit. 

On a layout arranged as a number 




separate Controller 




use 





of 

board this 

■ 

to bring into use 
yard unit 





Sometimes 








worth while assembling 





over a 



case 



whole railway 

limited period of 

the yard unit can be brought from 

storage, set up on its supports, or even 




on a 




an 





interesting shunts 

out. This is good practice in 





ion and is a 
working through 
running 






from 
complete 

engine and 








MAGAZINE 



103 





A 



■ . 



wagon repair depot*' tormed of hvo Hornby- Du bio Engine Sheds, Note the engine and brake van passing down 

the main line on the way to pick up a train. 



a few 



wagons 



are .ill the 







• 



k 



necessary and with them a great 

n can he 





often ask whether shunt- 




operations can be carried out 



success 

L 





with 




ilo Clockwork 



lves. 






provided that care 
management of 








or 





ally has more 



is 




the 
engines. A fully 
fully wound engine natur- 

than one that 

tend to 

two 



4 1 ■ f I 

v i m 



well run down and 
too boisterous in 




moving 



and three wagons in and out of the 
sidings. The method to be employed 



therefore is to wind the engine just 




for each movement to 



be made. This sou mis 







it is 



;sary, as 




not so: patience is 

ve often pointed 




out when recommending this scheme 



1-p— r 



of working clockwork engines. Once 



the amounts of 



ft * 



* 1 

wind 



r i 



to 




given 









various movements w 

are found. 




clown. With 




however the operator usui 

that he can remember the require- 



men ts 





engine 




if 



dri ve 



f I 



it 



accordingly. This winding up is not 




much ; 

too 



<T1 








couplings 
Dublo 




on- 

by 

of the automatic 
which all Hornby- 
Rolling 



a 



nd 




are provided to see whether 
the shunting engine is wound up 
once or 




times. Handling of 
the engine is necessary in any case 
when reversing 

opera 





uncou pie 




their 
engines and wagons literally "by 

hand 1 * but an improvement is to 



nu 




use of that useful 



the Hornby Shunters 1 Pole. 



handled the 




of this 




"loops" and the Pole given 



a 






t 



slight 



twist. The 




of this i 




to depress the lower coupling and to 




ment. 



the upper one out of 



The 



w a srons 




1 



uncou | 



i 




enga 




e- 



wagon 








where required and 



the endue and the remainder of the 



^ 




draw- 



next 



away 



movement. 
[needed with the 



A 




for t h e 



is 







Shunter's 




but ^ with 

art is soon acquired. 



pract ice 





uid 



At many large shunting or con- 
in real practice the 

repair shops 
s that hire out 

some- 



rat I wavs 




in addition 




wagons to private 

times main 

can be 







■ 




se 




ended to when 

necessary. It would be an interesting 
novelty on a Hornby-Dublo system 
to establish a wagon depot at a large 
goods yard. On the upper illustration 





s uc 1 1 a 



wag 



on 



repair 



is seen, 



formed 



o f 







a 




a 



few spare pairs of wheels will help to 




main 









on at 



the depot. 

The Hornby-Dublo 




Wagons, 



both the 1 li^h-sided and the normal 








are 

tic load of 

is a dummv 
eff 



prov 




wi 




a 




This 




co ur se 





is useful for 




but it cannot be made 







of in connection with 






and 



un lea. din 



readers make 
Imitation Coal, which 






it can 
to the 



large for wagon loads, but 




be 




to 




is tic effect in yards where 




coal traffic is specialised in. Coal 

Jl 

ns a most important part of the 

on British railways and most 
readers will be able to call to mind 

where 




some 




their 





is handled. 
stacks and heaps 



is seen everywhere 




there 



mvaria 




several 



road 




loading up for distribution of house- 
bold coal. For Dublo layouts 
this 




business 



is 



carried 




the 



various 



ca n 




Toys Road Vehicles 







used ver^ 





a> 



in 



an article in thes» 



pages rec 



In most 




is 




on a le 



sidings, 






that motor trucks and coal carts can 



cross over 




m 



at 



a 




' point. 

Dinky Toys Pavement sections can 

be used quite effectively for this 



purpose, building them up on top 





raised 




until the surface 



• 

l 




height, 






gi vi n 




a realistic effect. 



two Horn b v- 

IF 

Dublo Engine 
Sheds. T h i s 



gives yet 
another use for 



this buildin 
a d d i t i o n 




in 

to 



those mentioned 
i n these 




a 




while 






ago. If a private 
firm's depot is 
established a 
notice or board 



giving the name 




the 



concern 



a d d s 



to 




e 
interest and 



realism of 



the 



scene 




will be 



made to separate the couplings of noted from the 
adjacent vehicles, the hook being illustration 

to. On 



inserted 










the two 






Shunting in progress on a Hornby-Dublo Clockwork Railway. The engine is drawing 

out on to the shunting spur at one end of a group of sidings. 



104 





MAGAZINE 



Unusua 



Load 




on 



Horn 







Wr 



// 



opecia 




r 




miniature railway en 




IS 




freight 



vehicle.' 



s 



ways trymg 



to 



Imitation Coal and 



the 




Horn b y 




and develop his line in order 

on it even more 




attractive. This is not 







G 



■of increasing 





Bricks an- excel Us it for loose h»ads 

■ 

wagons, and there are the 



in 



way 




fun. however, 




different pieces of miniature luggage, 

the 



particularly 




hamper, 



in 








coach working in miniature* A 



41 



County of Bedford," running tender first, works its train along to 
the carriage sidings. 







r e 




ment of 

and its surroundings it 

ating to try the introduction 




that 




No, 1 of 

be 

of various 





of variations in 













wo 




ing 









vay Accessories 

"into covered 

Then there 




are the miniature table Drums and 



the 



us details o 
unusual train running in which they 
indulge, and this article is 



popu 





amers, 








which provide impressive loads. 
Container traffic in fact forms a 








some of the ideas that have been 
used by various miniature railway 
"Operating Superintendents." 

One point in favour of the develop- 
ment of unusual or novel operations 



special subject on its own that we 
hope to deal with in these 
some future article. 




in 



M uch 




be done too 




i 



odd 




is 



alt erat i o n 




require no 




the 



layout 



i 



being 



mostly connected with the trains 



and 



stock themselves 





ley 




t o 



b e 



"in stock." 
On most 






use of as easily 
portable model 

railways, who have to clear their 
systems away when finished with, 

as by those who are fortunate 
enough to have their railways laid 
down permanently. 

The loading of goods wagons is 

an early step in the 
leme of improvements in 
tions. We have often made 

on this subject in 
for there is a variety of required for 

immediate 

■ - 

use they 



items such as pairs of wheels and 

any loco- 

motive 
components 

that may 

happen. 





can be employed most effectively as 
loads. For instance, pairs of 

into an open Wagon or on a 

a con- 

of the 
some out-station repair 

can be considered as 
a load of railway equipment for 



Flat Truck can 

from 





s 




ment overseas 




Parts 






also can be used, Rods in particular 
being effective in 





tubes 




I'S 




pipe 

are 



for various pur- 




seen 













slope" over 




end 




an 



open wagon, or sometimes supported 



on the bolsters 
Long loads of 
a 




a lumber wagon. 






may require 



bogie 




and they 








supported intermediately between 
the bolsters by one or two pieces of 

of the right thickness. 




rip 




Pinions, Gear Wheels and sii 
Meccano Parts can be 









ar 



effect i\ 



c 




of an 







engineering 



One 

f reigl it working, 




feature of 




pecial 




u 







i.'f 



present-day conditions, is the varied 




that one sees 





trains, 
passenger locomotives are pressed 




into service on 



empty w agon t r a i n s 
"Keep traffic moving 
convenient for the 




and even 

order to 



■ 




is m 



railway 



owner who has, as a rule, not a great 



de 




of 




in locomotive types; 



if he can reasonablv use a passenger 
engine on a goods train, so much 
the better. The lower illustration 
on this page shows a 1 Lornby "Eton" 



Locomotive on an em 



train. 



This 




wagon 



is 




appro 









miniature 
railways 

there is an 

accumula- 
tion of such 
items, 

where 



are 





not 




7 tO 





■ 





in 




be employed for 




Series that can 

loading of 



A passenger engine on an empty wagon train. This unusual sight is typical of present- 
day operations. 








i 








MAGAZINE 







3 











I 




An interesting group of special trains on a Hornby railway. The "special train" boards on the engines add to 

the realism of the scene. 



n o wac 



way 





>s, although in the ordinary 
"Schools' * class would never 



represented. Operating conditions on 
an H.R,C. Branch layout inva 




ear on a train 

"Eton" 






. In 
quite an 

impressive engine to use on a goods 
train; with its smoke-dell cctors and 



are 



favourable 




this 



working, 

been 





type 




Branch layout 






to 



route indicating discs it 

S.R. practice. 



represent the practice and operations 








one 





o 




Some 





i* 





Even the slightly larger No. 3 
type of Hornby Locomotives are 
much favoured 1 »v some "Locomotive 
Running Superintendents" for freight 
work on Hornby railways. Their 
power is an advantage where heavy 

ave to be dealt with, and as 

far as appearances go the engines 
are typical * of the 
rpes in use in real practice to-day. 

passenger traffic in minia- 
ture is not so 
as 

of special trains forms an interesting 
change from the normal routine. War 
conditions of course have brought 



best-known "collections" of locomo- 
tives and rolling stock belong to the 
occasions, in peace time, when a 
number of special trains are run in 

connection with some 

or 

of 





event. On a Homb 



course 



there 



is no nee 









to war- 
ions. The upper illustra- 
page shows a selection 
of trains of both L.M.S. and L.N.E.R. 
companies and even includes an 






-Pullman special 









in charge of an 



freight, but the 



L. N. E. R. 
"Flying 

" Such 




identified readily by 

by its passengers. It will 





different 




are 




and 
noted 

of marking the 

this 




tvpical of the respective practices of 

L.M.S. and the L.N. E JR. com- 

The letters "SPL" on the 




u an i es 

r 









L.N.E.R 




of course stand for 
the practice on the L.M.S. is to show 
by the use of an initial letter the 
particular section from which the 
train has come. Thus "M" stands 
for Midland section, "W" for Western 



section and so on. 



. 



-. _ . . - _ - 

Miniature "boards" 





ilymade 




and 



lettered, cardboard or post card 
Inclian 





n 





the boards to 







brackets 




paper 







Locomotives a 

of brown or other stiff 
to the back of the 

■ 

be q uite satis 
Alternatively two small holes pierced 
in the upper edge of the board 
allow a small piece of cotton to be 
attached so that the board can be 
hung up on the top lamp bracket or 
the handle in the 
smoke-box door. 





of 





storage of th 



pty trains 



until required for the return journey 

coach 








ecessitates em 

working away from the 
station 




t 



i 



to sidings or yards 




Th 



sometimes calls for 



"tender first" working on the 
of the 

sicrhts 







engine 




t-i 





some mterestin 

this kind are sometimes 

Specials from stations near at 




times worked back to 











m 



• 






th 



t h ei r 



engines "tender first" to save turning 
and possible delay at the turntables 

1 ^ 







man. 

varietv 




s 



into being such things as Evacuation "to the interest 

of the traffic 



'Specials," primarily for the move- 

ren from danger 

s in peace 






working. 



areas to 



safe 



& 



districts. 




A feature 






time with intensive excursion 




that 



a varietv of 





■ _p 



» 



and 




is used on these 
mixed traffic 




i s 
on 




locomotives are most favoured 




locomotives 









running. 
of the Hornby E120 or No. 1 



the use 




Clockwork 





with trains 



shown is 

■ 

"special train" 
number board. 



of No. 1 or No. 2 Coaches according 
to the rolling stock available. 

where the stock of 

one system is in use 

effects of "through running" 



This 




more 




i s 
i n v a r i a b 1 v 

. . ■ ■ . . ■ ■ 

carried on 
ic engine of 







An interesting loaded 




, 




t tr 
make 



ain. Die-cast wheels. Meccano Parts and other items 
realistic and unusual loads. 



* 




and sheds. This is a method of 



can be obtained 




s 1 






easy w 

their mini at 



eral owners combin 



The 








n one 




ay 



material to 




tl 



ure to be several different 




are 

ays 




and this 



s 














of 

* 

rai 



Next month 

• ■ - ■ 

more in teresting 




on 



f 



a 



mi n i 




a special train, especially when many 

such trains are being worked to one working that may save a great deal 

particular destination. 
show the "Train number" as set 

n in the operating programme. 

each train to 





deal with 
s of this kind. 






106 






Hornby Trains in Argentina 

The accompanying illustration shows the 

lively interest aroused by a special display 



of Hornby Trains arranged by one of our 




in 




Argentina, Sr. 





Moreno.. The display consisted of an ex 



tensive system of Honibv 




frack on 



which all operations were controlled 
electrically from a single point; the degree 
of control afforded, it is claimed, had not 

■ ■I ■ ■ 



previously been attained in the Argentine 
Republic. Hornby [Locomotives of all 
types were in use drawing trains of various 

In 




both jmsscnger and 




mJ - 




engine 



movements being 

_ 



addition to the 

■ 

completely controlled, special apparatus 
devised by Sr. Rafel 

the electrical 





ens u red 

m J* 1 

of points- and 
turntables, the ontn 1 of a powerful crane. 

the automatic coupling and uncoupling of 
vehicles and the loading and discharge of 
Side-Tipping Wagons. 

In addition to the usual Hornby Acces 
series, such as Signals and Lamp 




the display 




also items 



*l I J 

I 




i 



gine 



ndards, 

tike the 

Loading 







Shed, Goods Platforms, 

and su on. Special attention was 

ler lineside 

wavs and trees. 

layout was such tliat organised parties from 
schools visited the system and the Foto 

Club made a complete film of the operations 
carried out on this notable system. 

_ * 



For the illustration and the description 

of the layout wc are indebted 








and Cia. Soc. 
in Argentina of Meccano J.ul. 



* 




The ''Banking' 1 of Trains up Steep Inclines 




(Commit from page TS\ 

in the empty stock assists the train out not 
so much from necessity as to combine the 
saving of a separate movement with some 
useful initial 



of 

fever, 

the small locomotives then used had great 







difficulty in getting trains up the incline, 
particularly when weather was bad; but 

the practice then was to attach the assistant 
■ -* ' L Qf a s — ' _1 



engine 



in front 




means 




slip-coupling. When the tram neared the 
top of the gradient the leading engine was 
"slipped" and ran ahead into a dead-end 
siding, the points then being reversed 

between it and the train by a pointsman 



specially chosen for his alertness and 

cool head! 



Cipher Solution 

In the puzzle at the end of the 

on ciphers on page 17 of the January 




"MM. 



»i 



the 




that had to be 




was: EMRTT EESLS IYPON 

A SOVTE XCHMA 






FKOCA 

SDEOD SLBEO ETAMO 

counting up the letters we find tliat there 

are 54 of them, which suggests a rectangle 

rs along one side and nine 

along the other, say six columns and nine 

the succession of 







rows. So we write 

letters in this form, reading 

down and up in the columns. This gives 




rna 







as the rectangle 




in Fig. 1. It soon 



becomes' clear that the columns have been 
transposed. The clue is to be found in the 
fourth row, where there are the letters of 
the words 

■ 

that we 




THE. Suppose then 




u in ns 




w i 1 1 
make up the word ANl> in the fourth row. 

The easiest way to continue is then to set 
out the remaining three columns to 



the word THE in the fourth row 



give 
The 




is the rectangle 




Fig. 2, and 




reading the lines from left to right we get 
the solution: CODES TAKE MANY 
FORMS AND THE MOST COMPLEX 



MAY BE 

E 
M 

R 

T 

T 

E 
E 

S 

L S O 

Fig. 



■Jf 




TO SOLVE, 



o 


C 


s 


K 


A 


A 


F 


Y 


M 


N 


A 


H 


O 


M 


C 


P 


M 


X 


Y 


A 


E 


1 


S 


T 



D 

E 

O 

D 



V 
1. 



L 
B 

E 

O 



T 

N 
S 

E 
O 

M 
A 

T 

E 



C 

A 
A 

M 

M P L 



o 


D 


K 


E 


F 


O 


N 


D 


O 


S 



A 
S 

o 



Y B 

I E 

S O 

Fig. 



E 

M 
R 

T 
T 

E 

E 
S 

L 
2. 



S 
A 

M 
H 
C 
X 

E 

T 
V 



T N 

s 

E 

O 

A 

T 
E 



Camouflage and Colour Blindness 

A short time ago candidates for positions 
as observers in the United States Air Corps 

were flown over an area that had been well 



cam on 




fed, and told to try to pick out 



as many military objectives as they could, 
The results were disappointing, some of 

the candidates 



failing 



to 



single object. This 



distinguish 



a 




was amazin 








■ 

A Prospect of Living Longer 

is a surprising range of life in the 




animal world. The honey bee drone lives 

for only a few weeks, but the whale may 



that 

ive. but 
was always the possibility that the 
candidates themselves were to blame. To 

test the matter an artillery officer who had 

trained as an observer was flown 
over the same area, and he 
distinguished every gun position 




difficulty hut recognised many 








The j 




display layout described on this page. Continuous ru 



interesting use of the Hornby Viaduct is seen on the elevated track in the foreground 



lining 
levate 



lines encircle the whole 




ut, and an 



i 

continue to exist for several hundred 
years. The elephant also has a long span of 
life, ranging from 80 to 120 years, and with 



these examples in mind it might seem that 

* . 4 * ■ i * ■ r m . i Fn * * i ■ 




— 

bulk and long life 



g° 




This is not 

correct, however. The turtle, which is much 
smaller than the whale, may live to be as 
old as 200 years, and popular imagination; 
gives it an even greater age than this at 

death. An even mure striking proof that 

mere bulk does not count in this respect is 



prova 




by the fact that a crow may 



outlive an elephant; it has a span of life 

M J- 

several times that of the ostrich, the 

largest bird in the world, which is very 

old indeed when it is 50. 

Fishes provide interesting contrasts in 
expectation of life. For instance, a young 

goldfish mav look forward to swimming 

around for 30 years or more, but tire salmon 

of 15 



military objectives as welt To complete 

tests his eyesight was examined, and 
the astonishing discovery was then made 
that he was colour blind. For him camou- 
flage was useless, as his sight enabled him 
to avoid the traps set by the cunning use 

of colours. 

The episode suggests that there is room 
for the application of defects that for most 
purposes are regarded as handicaps. A 
colour blind observer would be handicapped 
by inability to recognise signal 
clearlv. and in many other wavs, but there 




js certainly room 



for believing 



that his 



pec 




vision con hi be put to good use. 



Gold in Plenty 

With memories (if great gold rushes 

• , • m. — a. _M 




v J edge 



nf t he immense qun.n 




attain an 







can o 

years, and the herring two years. 

Naturally the span of life, both of man 
and of the animal creation, has always been 

of great interest, and recent 
have led to the startling prospect that 
may be increased in a very simple manner. 
This suggestion is based on special feeding 

tests that have been carried out in America 

with white rats. To a white rat 10 days is 





gold won from mines in South 
Canada and elsewhere, it may be thought 
that gold is getting scarcer and that the 

supply is running out. This is 



means 







<- 





no 



that we 



s u r 







and that there are yet enormous quantities 

awaiting dis^overv. It is said indeed that 





ear is to a human being. 



so 



as long as a 

that a rat 7C>0 days old is as old as a man 

of 70. By giving these animals diets that 

brought them very slowly to maturity their 

e been practically doubled. The 
slowing down of growth by careful feeding, 
seems to bring about a slowing down of 
the approach of old age. 




es 




in South America a "find" so 
rich has been made that its w 

are being kept secret. 

One place where there must be enormous 

quantities of gold unworked is California. 

where old river channels that are probably 

in gold have been covered over by 
lava deposits. This area could be explored 

by means of drills, which are now used by 

in all parts of the world. 







THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 






107 







• 







Marc 




Crosswor 




Puzz 








i 




CLUES ACROSS 
L^Own. 

3* Extent 

11* Annoy. 

12. Possessor. 

14* Ancestors, but 

15. Trudge, 

16* Motor car parts. 

19* Great 

20. Cut down. 

21. Part of the body, 

22. Alternative. 

■ 

23. Slumbered. 

- 

24. Bird of prey, 

26. Familiar name 

28, Equalled* 

29. Extremely small. 
31. Coins* 

34. Youth, 






—.*-,% 






■ * 



i 



,■ ■ 






s wooden* 









* ,m 



fcri 




m 



35, String or fabric. 

37, Unique. 

38. Vegetable fibre. 

40. Spread by rumour. 

41. Made comfortable. 

42. Shelter. 












■ 




t 


1 


jaw* - - 




! 


n>. 




1 

1 


• •■; 


Ifc 




n 


hd 
















■ 






1 i 

1 ■ * 








^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^J 


f i ■ ^k w X ^H 








\z^^ 








p "t 





• . 



" 



* - 



m\ 



"W«*.. . 



V 



iki. 



I, 









I 



* * 



■- I 



t 






- 'AY 



B 






i- 







CLUES DOWN 
1. Ring. 

2> Barbarian. 

4. Anger. 

5. Heavy round the 

6. Andent. 

7. Not wanted. 

8. Rebels, 

9. Closest 

10. Figure of speech. 
13. Necessary for life. 
17. Easily bent 

18* Proclaimed by authority. 
20. Take over. 

■ 

24. Guards. 

25. Waterproof. 



27. Church dignitary. 
30. Edge. 

32. Rise. 

33. Rainy. 

36. Purposes. 

39, Cover with sugar. 




■ 



Entries in Crossword Puzzle Contests 

■ : 



are always very large in number, and 

urge us to include more 



readers 



o 





It is clear that they are 
popular, so here for our March Contest is 

e. All the words can 

- 



one of our usual 

be found in Chambers' or any other 




stan 




Dictionary, and 




clu 



fs are 



straightforward, so 




every reader, 



or old, will find the puzzle both 



young 

interesting and 




There 1 are two 



sections, Home and Overseas, and in each 



Entries should be addressed, "March 
Crossword Puzzle, Meccano Magazine, Binns 
Road, Liverpool 13.*' The 
the Home section is 31st 






in 

m 



prizes of 21/ 



15/-, 



10/6 and 5/ 



res- 



pectively will be sent to the readers who 
submit the four correct solutions that are 




■ ■ 






or 




novel in presen 




The Overseas section 31st July. Competitors 
must not cut out the diagram reproduced 
on this page. Instead, they should make a 
copy for use as their entry. 



HORNBY 






Did This Train Run? 



This month we have a novel competition 
in which full scope is given for the detective 
powers of readers as well as their knowledge 

•f British railways. Below is given a story 

of a cross-eountrv railway journey in Great 
Britain. In the course of this the names of 



the railway companies concerned are no 



t 



given, and readers are asked to find these 
from various clues that have been intra- 

duced. Here is the story: 

n My trip was a through journey involving travel 
over important sections of two of the big British main 
line railways. Over the first main part of the run I 
was carried in the stock of one company over the 
metals of the other, and the locomotive over this 
stretch belonged to the latter company, It was in- 
teresting to reflect that at one time the engines 
employed over the whole journey might easily have 
been of the 4-4-2 or "Atlantic* 1 type, yet differing 
widely from one another in design according to the 
practices of their owners. As a matter of fact an 
"Atlantic" did take the train over the first main 



steel-panelled, and with the windows flush with the 

other sheeting. 

"Immediately after starting the train passed over 
a notable bridge over a river famous in the ship- 
building world, and the first part of the run took 
me through colliery districts. After Ihe first stop, 
loo, at a cathedral city we traversed a lofty viaduct 
and then further coal mining areas. Then after a 
further halt at a place connected with one of the 
earliest steam railways in this country we set out on 

and level course on 

the British 




notably s 

time the fastest train in 



part of the run, but the engine was not a "native" 
of that section* Its cab and its wide fire-box, apart 
from other details! showed that it originally belonged 
to another section of the group over whose metals 
ft took my train. The coaches however were charac- 
teristic of the practice of their owning railway. 



a run over a 

which at one 
Empire used to run. 

"During the first main part of the run I noted that 
for some distance extensive resignalling had been 
carried out and modern colour-lights controlled from 
a most up-to-date looking cabin had replaced the 
tower-quadrant semaphore signal characteristic of 
the area gcnerallv. Actually this resignalling was 
described in the "M.M." some time ago, and Indeed 

an illustration of the train 1 travelled in appeared 

also more recently. The first main part of the run 
ended with our arrival a! a most important railway 
centre, the station there having a magnificent curved 
roof and extremely long platforms. 

"Soon after this stop we parted company with the 

main route over which we had been travelling, and 
ultimately branched off again on to a cross-country 
route of considerable importance. Then before the 
next stop we passed from the metals of the first 
company to those of the railway owning the train, 
though our locomotive had previously been changed 



sturdy 



black-painted 

the 




at the important junction, a 

engine with a tapered boiler having replaced 

one with which we had commenced bur trip. 

"A difficult section with awkward gradients lay 
ahead, contrasting strongly with the easy part of 
the run previously referred to. Soon the line pierced 
a notable chain of hills by means of a long tunnel 
which was originally driven over 100 years ago* 

us to this our progress had been controlled 
by another colour-light signal installation differing 
in principle from that passed earlier in the journey. 
Easing down a very sharp gradient we came to a 
stand at a famous station well known for its extremely 
long platform and again for its signalling. 

"The final stage of the journey to a seaport city lay 

over a length of railway noted for the tightness of its 
schedules in days gone by. We drew up in the terminal 
station, where at one side electric suburban trains 
were accommodated* In fact for the last few miles 
of the run we had traversed electrified tracks/* 

■ 

Competitor^ are asked to find the names 
of the railway companies concerned, and 
also to explain the route over which the 
train runs, naming the starting and 
finishing points and the places of im- 
portance or interest passed through. 

The i on test is divided into the usual 




sections, for Home and Overseas 
respectively, and in each prizes of 21/ 



s 



* 



15/ 



10/6 and 5/- will be given for the 






four best entries in order of merit. Entries 

Journey 





must be addressed 
Contest, Meccano Magazine, Binns 
Liverpool 13." Closing dates: Home Section 
31st March; Overseas Section, 31st July. 



108 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 







DISCREET 

Mistress: "Marie t when you wait on the tabic to* 
night tor my guests, please don't spill anything/* 
Maid: "Don't you worry, ma'tm; I never talk much. 1 * 



• 



• 



Porter: "Madam, this train goes to Bristol and 
points West." 

Madam: "Young man; t want a train to Crewe, and 
*I don't care which way it points/ 1 



• 



• 



Neighbour: "When you grow tip what is your 

ambition! Tommy?" 

Tommy: "Id like to have people tremble like leaves 
at the rtierc mention of my name/* 



• 



• 



* 




WARNING 

■ 

It happened -it the Zoo. From the almost solid mass 
of people on one side of the elephant-walk there darted 
a small bov who paused, bun in hand, in the track of 
the big elephant- 
Just as the animal extended its trunk to take the 

there came a harrassed voire- from the crowd: 

"Mi ltd, Willie Mind f e don't sting voifl M 

m * m m 







Mrs. McP hereon informed her husband on* morning 

that she expected a parLv of quests that afternoon. 

He immediately rose and put all the umbrellas away. 

"Why, Alec, she exclaimed, "ttee ye fear that ma 
guests will steal yer umbrellas? 11 

Sae t Vm afraid thev'H recognise them/' 

* * • * 

but I 



Fraftl 



NOT LIKELY 

An old fanner iame upon a man fishing by a pond 
near his farm. 

"Any lurk?' 1 he shouted. 

The angler shook his head. Later on in the day the 
farmer happened to pass that way again and saw the 
man still casting his line, 

"Any luck?'* he asked once more. 
"No," muttered the fisherman. "Are there any fish 
at all in this rotten pond?" 

"Don't rightly know/ 1 mused the fanner, "Pond 

weren't there yesterday!* 1 

* « * 



SI 1*1 L % 1.1 ft IIS 

he did not understand the thermometer, hut she 

took her husband's temperature with it and 

held a mutch under it to read it properly. 
She sent a frantic message to the doctor. 

"Come at once; temperature 156 degrees/* 
To which the doctor replied; **l can do nothing. 
Send for the fire brigade!" 






* 



• 



An income-tax collector had died and a subscription 
was raised in an office for a wreath* The boss promised 
five shillings, A few days later one of the clerks called 
to collect the money, and the chief handed him a 

1 0*hilling note, 

"You want five shillings change, sir/ 1 said the 

"No/ 1 prowled the other. "Keep it and bury an- 
other tax man/* 




* 



• 



* 



*• v* 





not? 



First Tramp: "J went 

duran't go agin/ 1 
Second Tramp: fl 

because of the dorg?* 1 

First Tramp: "No, but me trow&is isl*' 
Second Tramp: "Youe trowsis is what?" 
First Tramp: "Frayed because of the 



dorg!" 



* 



* 



• 




; Jones: "We need a new roof/ 1 
Jones: "What's the matter with the old 
one? It doesn't leak/ 1 

Mrs, Jones; "No, but I dm/t want to be 
ashamed every time an aeroplane flies over 

the house/* 

* * * • 

An old lady sat knitting at 

the end of the pier, from which 
a pleasure steamer was about 
to start. 

Suddenly the captain shout- 
ed "All right! Cast off now!" 

The old 
sham I v. 



lady looked up 



"Thank yo.u t officer/' she 

called, "but I'm quite capable 

of doing my owe knitting.*" 

* * # * 

A school class was engaged, 
in the study of English gram- 
mar — particularly tenses. 

"Now, Smith/* said the teacher, "if t wire to say, 
4 have £10,000' what tense would that be?" 

!" answered the lx?y. 




- Jimmy declined a second helping of 
jell v. Pressed to change hi& mind he 
explained: '•Mummy told me to say 
'no, thank you/ but perhaps she didn't 
know how small the helpings would 

be;" 



old ladies had decided to take 

a trip in an aeroplane* 

They were about to get into 
the machine when one of them 



n*_* 



You will 



said to the pilot. 

brintf us back safely, won't 

vou?" 

"Oh, yes, madam/ 1 was the 

reply, "I've never hit anybody 



up It. 




vet. 



r» 



• 



* 



"Poppa, what's a millennium?" 
"Rnstus, dat is de same thing 
as a centennial p *cept it's got 
more legs." 



tt 



* 










was an old fellow 

from Lincoln, 

Whose eyes were eon 

bliiiroln« 

was wrong. 





14 




* 



Tone "There goes Jake the auctioneer* He drives 
an awful bargain/ 1 

Dick: M V«s f I know, I was riding in it last night/* 

* * • m 

At a village concert the audience was regaled with 
mineral waters by young lady helpers. 

"Do you see that man on the platform who is 
singing has got his eyes shut?*' said a facetious member 

of the audience to one of the voting ladies. 

"Yes. What is he doing that for?" 

"He can't bear to look at us. He knows wot we're 

stiff erin' ! " 



'For comiurt, I always choose a six-wheeler" 

[By courtesy of **The Commercial Moiof') 

A large flustered woman, dragging a small boy, 
sailed through the station ticket barrier and approached 

her waiting tiu-baud. 

"Hullo" said the man, "vou're late/ 1 

I talk about it, A if/ 1 replied his wife 
"I never *ad such a time! What with 



When they asked 

He replied, "Get along! 

When I'm thincoln 1 can't keep from wincoln/ 1 

* * m m 

The AR.P, Warden was giving Sirs* Mataprop 

[*'w bint* in '.MM' m iiir raid*. Aitrrwards he askud 

what he had explained was quite clear to her. 



a 
if 



Yes, sir/* she replied, "But it's going to be a 



sticky business using that there syrup pump! 11 




i 
* 



"Oh, ... 
breathlessly 

■ 

young Bill 'anging on me *and f me 'auciti£ on to the 

luggage rack, the train 'irng up in a tunnel, and you 

"angtag about in the station for me, 1 was in a regular 
state of suspense/* 



* 



A young man who was anxious to team swimming 
made little 



44 



) 




» 



* 



• 



At a loss for something to amuse her five-year-old 



**I expect 1 s-shall/' panted the beginner as lie 
clung desperately to the side of the bath, "and a 

h-h-harp as well, old boy/ 1 




* 



• 






A NOBLE ANIMAL 



ter, a woman conceived the idea of taking her to 

the British Museum. A visit was paid to the mummies. 

"What are those things?" the child demanded. 

"Those are mummies, dear/" said her mother, and 
she was proceeding to impart further information 
when she was pulled up with: 

"Aren't there any daddies?' 1 



* 



* 



• 



• 



The golfer lost his ball and, not unnaturally, was 
inclined to be annoyed with his caddy, 

14 Why didn't you watch where at went?** he asked. 

"Well, sir/* said the boy, "it don't usual I V go any- 
where, and so it took me unprepared like." 




• 



m 



* 



. 






A farmer had a horse for sale. He wanted £80, 
but was offered only £50. He refused to sell-. 

That night the horse died, so he telegraphed the 

prospective buyer: "Am witling to accept your offer 

of £50 for horse/ 1 

He received a wire clinching the bargain* Next 
•rning a cheque for £50 came by post, so he sent 

the horse by rail in the usual way. 
Some days later he attended the market* steering 

dear of the buyer* but at length they happened to 

meet. 

The buyer of the horse was very affable, so at last, 
plucking up his courage, the farmer said: "What 
about the horse I sold you?" 

"Well/' said the buyer, "unfortunately it was dead 
when it arrived, but 1 put it up to raffle. I got five 

men to take tickets at £20 each, and gave the winner 



A FKICE GIFT! 



his money back. 



A farmer met a rag*and-bone dealer and offered to 
sell him a horse. The dealer inspected the horse for a 
few minutes, then turned to the farmer and said: 
"He'll do. Woril ye have, a flag or a balloon?" 



* 



* 



* 



* 




THIS MONTH'S HOWLER 

Letters in sloping print are called hysterics 



Teachen "Johnny, give me what vou've got in 

mouth'/ 1 

Johnny: *Td like to. miss, It's a toothache!" 







( 



E 



I 





MECCANO MAGAZINE 



■ ■ 



VII 



1 





LTHOUGH the fascination of building models, etc 
with the ingenious Juneero multi-purpose tool must 



be experienced to be believed, we have never failed to 
emphasise that JUNEEKO is a highly practical tool capable 
of first-class work. Convincing proof of the practical nature 



of Juneero tools and materials comes from big engineering 
works throughout the country, where experienced works 



engineers and designers are using the same Juneero 
equipment as sold at your Juneero dealer to solve man- 
size problems. 

If you are of a mechanical turn of mind, or are thinking 
of taking up Aircraft or General Engineering as a career, 



you cannot afford to be without a Juneero set. No finer 
























way of developing your creative talents can be imagined than 
practice with the Ju neero tools, which, starting from strip and 
sheet metal and metal rod, enables you to turn out we" 
finished and accurate work on proper engineering principles. 
With the Juneero multi-purpose tool alone you can 
shear metal strips and rods to accurate lengths, punch 
holes for bolts in steel strip, bend strip to accurate right 
angles or any other angle required, and thread rod with 



the aid of the juneero screw cutting die. There's almost 
no limit to the things you can make with Juneero 

of 



mo 




a 




kinds 



utility articles, repairs, etc. Design sheets 



iving full instructions for building hundreds of interesting 
articles are available from your Juneero 






TO 








JUNEERO SETS 



includes the Juneero multi- 

Toof complete with 



NO* 1 aBl pyrpose 

spacer bar, two spanners, Juneero Die, metal 

and bolts, also 



strips, rods* nuts 

Manual and Specimen Design sheets. 

Price 



15 



/ 



No. 2 Set 



Includes the above plus patent 

Scroll Tool, metal shears, plain 

fc window substitute and 



and corrugated meta r 

assorted discs, in attractive metal box. 

Price 



30 



/ 




Set 



33 illustrated, 

addition 



containing 
in aooicion to Juneero, 
tools for cutting, punching, bending and forming 
* wealth of assorted Juneero materials suitable 



for workshop requirements, the whole 

being contained in a well-made wooden JL A/ 

Price 0%J 




Engineers Set 



comprises all the contents 
of the Workshop set but 
with larger quantities of certain materials, the 

whole contained In scout gauge meal 



case withstanding heavy usage. 



Price 



84 



t 



Fresh Supplies 



of materials for all sets 
are obtainable from your 



Juneero dealer in 1 - packets. If owing to war 

conditions you have difficulty in obtaining your 
set, send remittance to us and 1/- for packing 
and posting Nos. 1 and 2 Sets, 2/- for Workshop 
and Engineers Sets (abroad 5/6 extra for Nof» 

1 and 2, 10/- for larger sets). 





Your Junemo dealer 
is constantly having 



ntw 



etc. 



materials, 

to offer. Make a point 

of visiting him 

regularly. 



COUPON: Write Name and Address 




Margin 



BLOCK 
LETTERS 



To JUNEERO LTD., STIRLING CORNER, BARNET BY-PASS, BOREHAM WOOD, HERTS. 



Plea 



se sen 




particulars of Juneero Sets and name of nearest Juneero Dealer 



I 

I 
1 

I 

I 
I 

I 



* * • 



VUI 





MAGAZINE 













All over the world, the British Bulldog is noted for his strength 

tenacity. 

So it is with Seccotine, Seccotine is used all over the world by 
people in every walk of life FOR STICKING ARTICLES. 
Because Seccotine is so very strong and lasting in its results 
it has many imitators; but it is an established fact that since 
1884, when it was first made, it is infinitely superior in every 
way to its "next best." 

The question of surfaces presents no obstacles to Seccotine 
metal, wood, cardboard, etc., can be treated with equal success. 
Sold everywhere in pin-stopper tubes, complete with directions 
for use, 4^d., 7d., and lOd. 









ftlGO* 



i _■ 









POST THIS COUPON 



M'CAW, STEVENSON 

I ihould like to have, post free, 

copies of your Free Booklets 
which describe the many uses 
for Seccotine. 



ORR LTD. 



BELFAST 



If | M * M * t fit 



Address 





You'll 

film 



gee a thrill every time you develop a 
n Johnsons Developing Tank — and you 
will secure successful negatives. No previous 
experience is necessary* Johnsons Tank can be 
used by the beginner; as well as the expert. 

Johnsons Adjustable Tank takes five popular 
film sites ■.* ... *.. ... ... 17/6 

2/6 



_ • 

Time and Temperature Calculator 



Special 

Offer 

Address E/M Dept. 

JOHNSON & SONS Manufacturing Chemists LTD., HENDON, N.W.4 



For a 1/7 P.O. Johnsons wilt send you a trial set of Chemi- 
cals, including' t oz, bottle of AZOL, to develop eight spools 2 J 
by J$; 4-oz. tin ACID-FtKING, making 30-60 ozs. solution; 
one pocket M.Q. DEVELOPER, enough for 36 gaslight prints. 







MECHANISED ARMY OUTFIT 

■ ■ 

This special Meccano Outfit makes possible the 
building of models of a variety of Mechanised Army 

prototypes. 

It contains a big assortment of specialty designed 
Meccano Parts, including gun barrels, with which 
realistic models of Tanks, Antt-Aircraft Guns, Field 
Guns, Transport Lorries, etc., can be built. The parts 

are finished in the correct shade of 

Service green. 

Price 
17'3 

With 

Purchase 



. 



Tax 
21'- 






. 





This Mobile Anti-aircraft Qun u one 

of the fine models from the Manual 
of Instructions included in the Out/it. 

















THE 




MAGAZINE 





HOW 

ARE MADE 
From first design to completed 

fuselage 

of safety 

d craft like 
■' Spitfires,'* 



devices 
the 



SEE HOW A 

Details of a 
ning — laying the keel- 
ing the hull — fitting 

boilers and engines 
— launching— etc. 



placing 

in position 



ROADS 

Planning and surveying 
overcoming engineering diffi- 
culties — secrets of camtier and 
various types of surface — 
wonders of modern roads, etc. 

SEE HOW TUNNELS ARE MADE 

through 
kills — tun- 




Surveying 

soil and rock 

nelling under rivers and seas- 
ends meet 



If 



want to know 




making both 

railway and road tunnels, etc. 

HOW "TALKIES 1- 

ARE MADE 
Wonders of the photographic 
film — the sound track — what 
happens when the director 
calls "shoot"— the develop- 
ment of sound t etcLj etc. 



READERS of Meccano Magazine ! II you 
how things are made — how bombers, ships, roads, tunnels, 
houses, railways are constructed, and Films, newspapers, 
etc., are prepared, here is the book for you' An entirely new 
work now published for the first time -"HOW IT IS MADE,* 1 
Here in 384 big pages, over 100 t 000 words and more than 400 

explanatory photographs, drawings and diagrams, are revealed 
hundreds and hundreds of interesting facts about miracles of 

and mechanic*, science and building — from a 




SEE HOW CARS 



ARE 

^how 



M ass prod uc tio n - 

made and where 



are 

come from 
chassis to 
types and 



MADE 

parts 
they 



giant ocean liner to a radio valve, from a bomber to a gramo- 
phone record* This book is miracle war-time value. You 
would consider a work of such Great interest and educational 



-assembling, from 

sunshine roof — 

peculiarities, etc. 

SEE HOW HOUSES ARE MADE 
See what the builder uses 
uses of mud, wood, stone, 

"bricks and ferro -concrete 

electric light and 




power installations, etc. 

SEE HOW BRIDGES ABE MADE 

Why and bow various types 
of oridges are made— stone 

and steel, cantilever, swing 

:es — how bridges are 
ross rivers, etc., etc. 



would consider a work of such great interest and educatio 
value a bargain at £1,1.0, Yet it is being made available 
to readers of Meccano Magazine at an incredibly low privilege 
price. Supplies arc strictly limited, it is a case of first come, 
fkst served. All applications must be dealt with in strict 
rotation. Apply at once on the Forms below to-day* 
Look on the left at just a few of the subjects dealt with in this 

big volume* 

A THRILLING EXPERIENCE! 

To visit a shipyard, an automobile factory, an aircraft 
works, to see the making of roads, tunnels and railways, to 
be allowed to roam over a film studio and see what 

during the making of a big picture, to see bridges being built 
through all their stages, to visit a newspaper office while your 
newspaper is being printed, will be the experience of a lifetime. 

• CUT HERE, 



And these are only some of the things this wonderful book 
shews io vou. 

The actual sim of the volume is 9 in. deep by 6 in. wide. 
There are Two Editions: Standard and De Luxe. For the 
STANDARD Edition, handsomely bound in Red or Maroon 
Book Cloth with title embossed in the spine in gold, all you 
send is 3s. 3d. f plus ls. P which includes carriage, packin ~ 
insurance, etc., making 4s, 3cL in all. for the DE LUX 
Edition, beautifully bound in 2-wlour * ffect Art Leathcrcloth 
of rich shade, with title embossed on the spine in real 22-carat 
gold, all you send is 4s. 3d., plus Is. which includes carriage, 
ring, insurance, etc., making 5s. 3d. in alt. 





• 





NOW 



• 





in the Order Labels below — Be sure to indicate Edition 
required and affix a Penny Stamp to space provided on Label 

ti B il for Special Privilege printed matter and post at once 
together with a Postal Order for the correct amount according 
to the Edition required to: — 

ODHAMS PRESS LTD., "HOW IT IS MADE Book Dept-, 

X.M.M.S. r Kings Langley, Horts. 

Make Postal Order payable to Odhams Press LU. V and cross 
/& Co,/ Write your name and address on the back and keep 
counterfoil carefully — Do not delay— Remember, supplies are 

limited and it is First Come, First Served— AddIv now 





SEPARATE LABELS - 





HOW 



MADE 






SEE HOW RADIO SETS 

ARE MADE 

set is designed on 

how resistances, 

condensers, valves 
and other parts are made — - 

etc. 



APPLICATION 



FORM 



'How a 

paper 
•chokes. 




STANDARD 
EDITION 

4' 3 



Cross out Edition NOT 
required and enclose 

Rerait- 



DE LUXE 
EDITION 



appr 



tanec 



SEE MOW NEWSPAPERS 

ARE PRODUCED 

How paper is made and the 

•machines that make it — how 



a 



newspaper office is 

machines 




run 

type-setting machines — se- 
crets of printing presses, etc. 

HOW RAILWAYS 
ARE MADE 

Hoit lines are rolled and 
milled — the intricate mach- 

of signal cabins 
secrets of points and cross 
overs* etc*, etc. 



WITH 

Carriage Paid Home 



'Name 



*■-■!■ 










Address 






* lliv^iiiti r#tMI44 !.*■•- i ■ 



■ ■.**■■■ 



■ KB**-*- * « * * ■ 



« m m 



■ 







COllYlt "V 
vtH **r* JT -It » # 4 # . 4 p * r - * - * - . # * * +* * Im* ■ * ■ ft * * # 9>4 * * fr t * * # * fr 4 * 4 



■ m m. m ■ a m ■■*■■ ■ ^ -* A 



» r - r . m m m - - - * - m * 






Offer applies only to Gt. Britain, 
Free State. If undelivered return I 



Kings Langley* Herts, (X.M.M.S.)- 1 



N. Ireland and Irish 
to Oclhams Press Ltd,, 

1941. 






HM 



«4 










X 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 













; 




Obtaina 






rom 







Catalogue post 






rom 






Dept. M, LANDOR WORKS, ASKEW RD., 



SHEPHERDS BUSH, W.12 




Hornby Complete 



■ 

simplest way of be- 



ginning 



Hornby 



Outfit is a complete 

model railway 

contains 

components 



attractive 



M9 Compiete Model Railway 



List 



Price 



M8 Complete Model Railway 
M9 Complete Model 
M10 Complete Model Railway 
M11 Complete Model Railway 




* c • 



• • ■ 



* * * 



* • * 



• • # 

1 



Price with Tax 
17/3 

21/9 
34/6 







LTD 



BINNS ROAD 



21/. 

26/6 

42/- 
S7/6 

LIVERPOOL 13 










Simplicity is the keynote of this 
new building system, by means of 
which the youngest children can build 
all kinds of models with the greatest 
of ease. 



A fine model of a Motor Van 
built with Outfit No. 1, 



No, O DINKY BUILDER OUTFIT 

This Outfit contains a good assort- 
ment of Dinky Builder parts (includ- 
ing two road "wheels), with which a 
splendid range of models can be built. 
The Instruction Folder included gives 

examples of 40 models. 



List Price 4/ 



Price with Tax 5/- 



No. 1 DINKY BUILDER OUTFIT 



This splendid Outfit contains a varied selection of 
four road wheels for constructing miniature wheel 
Manual included shows a total of 56 fine models- 



parts, Including a set of 

; The Instruction 













List Price 8/- 



Price with Tax f/f 



No. 2 DINKY BUILDER 




The parts in this fine Outfit make possible the construction of six groups 
of miniature model furniture and other wonderful models. Full instructions 
for building 74 models are given. 

List Price 12/3 Price with Tax 15/- 



No. 3 DINKY BUILDER 






OUTFIT 



This is the 

and 



series, 




Outfit in the 



model-building 

possibilities are almost limitless. 

It is the ideal gift for young boys 

and „ 

this 



girls. 

The 



contained 



in 



parts 

Outfit can be used over and over 
again to make hundreds of dlff- 
crenc models. 

List Price 17/3 Price with Tax 21/- 




No, O Dinky Builder Outfit. 



MECCANO LTD. - BINNS ROAD - LIVERPOOL 13 



* 



- 



THE 





XI 



STAMP ADVERTISEMENTS 

Sec also page 98 





Grand set of 30 Belgium up to 
50 francs, catalogued 4/2, free 
to approval applicants enclosing postage. 

Wessex Stamp Service, (Dept.M). Parry's Close. Bristol 9 



DON'T MISS THIS! 












AT WAR PRIHF*? Owing to the War we offer oui 

ft i iinn rniuta. ce j eDrated aP p ros . as follows 

Choose any 2/6 worth for 1/-. Any 7/6 worth for 2/8 

*•_ 5/- „ „ 1/3. ,, €1 ,, ,, 5f- 
STAMPS and COLLECTIONS 





G. W. SAUNDERS LTD.. 57-59. Udgate Hill, London E.C.4 





BA 



MAR 

Morocco Agencies Centenaries 
Pitcairn Is* Set of 4 to 2d. 

Set of 7 to 1/* 
10 Mint Geo. VI Brit. Colonials 




GAINS 

Complete 9tf. 

7d. 
3/- 



I I 






ii 

1/- 

(Post Extra), 

To all applicants for my bargain approvals (id. to 6d.) 
I will end, absolutely FREE, 30 British Colonial 
Stamps including MINT NEW ISSUES. Send P.C. to 

C. W. GRIGGS, 16, Station Road. Woburn Sands. Bucks. 




GT. BRITAIN K.G.V 










This seaice high value stamp will bo given free to all 
genuine applicants for our famous ONE PENNY Approval 
BOOKLETS of BRITISH COLONIALS. Those 
abound with JUBILEES, CORONATIONS, large Bl- 
COLOURED PICTORIALS and the lales! KING GEORGE VI 
siamps. The best value on the market and every stamp an 
investment- no worthless foreign stamps, N.B.— Enclose 

2£d for Postage. 
S. FENLEY LTD., WINTON, BOUR 




SPACE FILLERS 10 a Id, (plus postage). 
*"*** = ritLClia By country „ rJ(?aae 

state requirements. Also — exccllcnr. well-presented 
approvals Id.— U-. General, Colonial or by 

Countries. 

G. MOAT, 39, Shelvors Way, TADWORTH, Surrey 



Gentleman has few duplicates for sale. If- packets, 
Catnlogue enormous. P erry, Edwinstowe, Notts, 

ALL THE 2d. IRISH COMMS. FREE 

The.se NINE fine stamps comprise all the 2d. values of 
the commemorative issues of EIRE. Will be sent 

to all applicants for my "WORTH WHILE" 
approval sheets who enclose 2jd. for postage. 

JOS. H. GAZE. 10. Pimlico Road. CLITHEROE. Lanes. 





MAGAZINE" 
SPRING BACK BINDER 

There is no better way of keeping your Maga- 
zines clean and tidy than by binding them in 
one of the special binders we supply. 

These binders have 
strong stiff backs* 

covered with black 

imitation leather, taste- 
fully tooled, and are 
lettered In gold. The 

er holds 12 
azmes — price 4/- 

{Purchase TaslJd. extra) 

post free. The small 

binder holds 6 

I 

Magazines — price 2/9 

{Purchase Tax 74* extra) 

post free 












MECCANO LTD 



BINNS ROA 



LIVERPOO 



3 



WE BUY TOY 




LWAYS 



Prompt cash paid for modern toy railways in excellent 
condition, also coy steam and hot air engines. Goods 
must be packed in WOODEN boxes or suitcases 

(returnable). GEORGES', 11, Frlors Street, IPSWICH 



MODEL AEROPLANES 

Send Penny Stamp for our Lists. Flying and 



Non-Flying Kits. "fROG"- 1 'PENGUIN" 
"SKYBIRDS." Balsa Wood. Cements. Dopes, 
If interested, ask for Chemistry List- Owing 
to high cost of printing, stamp should be sent. 





ORGE 



D. 



CAMPBELL 



46. HIGH STREET, DUMFRIES 



I 












CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENTS 

IN YOUR OWN LABORATORY 

Post Free OFFER of 

SAMPLE PARCEL 

containing many 
useful pieces of 

MEMCAL 
APPARATUS 

























Write also for 

FREE PRICE LIST 
of other Sets. 









(Scientific Dept.G), 60. High St.. 
Stoke Newington, London N.I 6. 





FOR 






HORNBY 




LAYOUTS 



Each Model Detailed 



PLATELAYERS' HUTS 
COAL OFFICES ■ 
WATER TOWERS 
WATER TANKS - • 



2 '3 
2 / 9 

6'- 



each 



BOOKS: 



Postage Extra. 



'* 



** 



f 



'•Signal* and Signalling" If., by post 1/3 
"Designing Loco. Bodies" 6tL, by post 9rf. 
"Track Electrification" 6d.. by post 9tf. 
"Electric Model Railways" 2/-, by post 2/4 

Also our usual range of Building Papers, 

Tyldcsfey & Holbrook. 109. Deansgate. Manchester 3 



ALL Gauges. Makes and Types bought, sold nnd part 

exchanged. Large stocks. Lists free, Watford Model 
Exchange, 29, Queen's Road, Watford, Herts, 

















still leads in offers of real bargains: radio & electrical 

DYNAMO BARGAIN. 100 volts 1 amp., D.C. shum. 
ballbearing "Croydon." 15lbs„ 6rn, x 5in. ( 12/6 post free, 
A.C. MOTORS.— Start on full load 1/60 h.p. with pulley. 
Type 50, 1,500 revs., 18 6. 1/25 h.p., Type 36.G, 3.500 
revs., 27 6. 1/4 h.p., 2,000 revs., 45/-. Squirrel Cage 
1/10 h.p. Motors, 2,500 revs., 35/-. 
D.C. MOTORS.— 1/40 h.p.. 110 or 220 volts, series, 
Type K.B., 1,750 revs.. 15 -. Type C. 1/35 h.p., 2.000 
revs,, 157-. 1/12 h.p. Type C, 110 or 220 v. shunt, 1.700 
revs., 30/-. Tiny Motors. 6 v., 12/6. 50 v., 14/-. 100 v., 
15/-. Electric Fans. 12/ 6. MOTOR GENS.— 220 v. A.C. 
to 100 v, I amp.. D.C, 60/-, Big stock all types. 

CLEARANCE Speakers, moving coil, mains energised, 

4/0. With speech transformer, 
either 1/-„ 

F.I and TRUV0X P.A. Speaker Moving Coil Units for 
Large Horns. 6 volts, 12/6. 

HIGH RESISTANCE 



6 6. Postage on 







Various Makes, 
order. 2,000 





AND RADIO 'PHONES. 
finest always is the adjustable Browns A Peed 

Aluminium swivel headband, 4,000 ohms. 35/6. 

ohms, 21 6. 120 ohms. 17/6. Cords 1/9. 

Second-hantf Head-phones in Rood 

and 4,000 ohms, 6 6 and 7/6, with 
cords. Western Electric. 2,000 ohms, 4/0. 

LEARNERS* MORSE PRACTICE SET. No, 3A Duplex 
with Key, Buizer and Lamp for sound and visual, fine 

on base. 7/-, 

MORSE KIT. Key on moulded base; buzzer and lamp, 4 6, 
Town send high-note tuning buzzer, 10/-. 

MORSE KEY'S. First class it low prices. A good small 
key on moulded base is the TX pivot arm, excellent for 
learners, 3/& Full size* well finished key, alt brass, solid 
pivot bar, adjustable tension, etc, t B.2 f 7 6. Superior 
Type P.P., fully adjustable, nickel finish, 0/6. High Grade 

Type fV. t plated fittings, polished wood base, a fine 
key, 10 0. Special Key on 3*s witch box for buzzer and 

2 lamps, C.A.V., 0/6* 

BELLS, G.P.O, type trembler Circular Desk Bell, with 
movement in gong, 1/6. Will Bells, trembler, 2/6. 

Ditto, large size, 7/6. Signal Bells, targe metal, 12- volt 
single stroke Bells, 10/-. 

ALARM BELLS. Small and large- Battery or mains D..C 

orA.C,,T0 Jn.gong, Domestic Bells and Fire Bells, cheap. 
Pk-ase state wants. Single Bell Wire, 1/6 per 100 yds. 
ACCUMULATORS, for stand-by HX, at Gd, per volt 

3 amp, hours, in 24 volt unit crates, glass cells, 12/- each* 
Can be parallel charged off 12 volts. 
Over 1.000 other Bargains in our enlarged Illustrated 

List "M.O." 










envelope, please. 



ELECTRADIX RADIOS 

21 8 f Upper Thames St. T London E.C.4 

Telephone: Central 4611 











You're Lazy you won't read 

far tn this talk. If you're not— if you have 

courage to face facts — you will want 
now what special effort on your part 




to k 

will enable you to get on. 

If You're a Shirker 

always wish for success but never do any- 

thing about it. The earth is cluttered with 



you 

I ^H 



'11 



that kind of man 



But 



f 




You're a 




you will set about doing something. You'll 
get the special necessary training that fits 
you for a good position and pood pay. 




l.C.S. — International Correspondence 
Schools— offers you that training. There is 
none better, none more convenient for the 



student. Let us tell you all about it. lust 
fill in the coupon below or write to ns in 
any other way. 



. COUPON FOR FREE BOOKLET ... 

INTERNATIONAL 

CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS LTD. 

Dept. 218, International Buildings 

Klngsway, London W.C.2 

PENNY Stamp on UNSEALED Envelope) 

Please send me free booklet describing l.C.S. Course* 
in the subject I have marked X. 1 assume no obligation. 








ACG 

advertising 
aeronautical eng. 

agriculture 

air conditions 

architecture 
book-keeping 
building 

business training 
chemical eng. 

civil engineering 

commercial art 

diesel engineering 

draughtsmanship 

electrical eng. 

french and spanish 

general education 
horticulture 



JOURNALISM 

LETTERING 

MARINE ENGINEERING 

MECHANICAL ENG. 

MINING 

MOTOR ENGINEERING 

RADIO 

SALESMANSHIP 

SANITARY ENG. 

SCIENTIFIC M'G'MENT 

SECRETARIAL WORK 

SHORT-STORY WRITING 

SURVEYING 

TELEVISION 

TEXTILE MANUF'G 

WINDOW DRESSING 

WOODWORKING 

WORKS MANAGEMENT 



INSURANCE 

EXAMINATIONS: 
Technical. Professional. Civil Service. Matrlcnlatfon. 



State your Exam, here 






■.■*■■ 



* . w f # m I 



I I . • * • 9 ft » ft * « * 



JL V* 1 ■ I ■' V llllfllVMiiMII 



«-**** + *■ 



4 m ft m * ■ V ■ 



b ft « ft V * + * « 




4 IlIUJ CjJ M *t*M«*ini4ii 



• ft i ft mm ft 






t ■ •• * ■• i m # ■ 



■ *■■»■■ ¥ * 



ifll ■ # a ft * * m i 



..■»«« . . 



■ ■ ■ ■ ■ - ■ ■ MUM* ■■■■■■•*M"ifi* 







'■"■" ■■ ■■*f4llltltilll 



Qreatest, largest and most 
famous of all institutions ae- 
voted to spaT£~timatrainingby 




postal me 




Branches 



in 30 countries* students in 50* 








# * 



XII 





MAGAZINE 






READERS' SALES 






AND WANTS 

Readers should note that all advertisements of Hornby 
Trains and other Meccano products included in this 
column relate to items no longer featured in the catalogue. 
Advertisements of current products cannot be accepted 
for this column* 

Sale. 100/- Red/Green Meccano, including No. 2 

Clockwork Motor and over 20 Gears; 45/- or nearest. 

Myrinji, 49, Chertsey Street, London S.W.I 7. 

Wanted* Pathi "H M Projector; good condition; 
•Mate price, particulars, etc.— P. Wright, 336, Fleet- 
wood Road, Thornton, Nr. Blackpool. 

Wanted. Type "C" Motor and Resistance lor Pat be* 
scope "Home Movie" model projector,— Shepherd, 
39, Clayton Avenue, Wembley* Middlesex. 

Sale. " Rolling Stock and Rath, 10/-; also Cigarette 
Cards. List.— M. Llttleworth, Whitwdl, HUchin. 

What offers! 23 "Boy's Own Papers", 1937 
J very, 11, Elm Road, Purley, Surrey 




■• 



8/e 




Sale. Bingoscope Home Film Projector, 17/6; was 

. Mount. 27, Beck Bank, Cottingham, Yorkshire. 

anted. Copies of August and November 1940 
lanuarv 1941 issues of the U MM H in good con- 
State price, Including postage.— Box M27. 
Sale. "Meccano Magazines" 19SZ-1939 (except Peb. 
1936). Offers, part or lot— Bxowuing, 39, Black 
Drove, Thorney, Peterborough. 

Wanted. Meccano Super Model Leaflets Numbers 
!A, 19, 20, 22, good condition. 6d. each pojt paid 
Scamell, 117, Lynd hurst Crescent, Hillingdon, Middx. 

ix.*«*i i7„ ff j«o <i»n& particulars. — 

Bedford, 





Wanted. Model Petrol Rngine. Send 
C. Young, 182, Bromham Road, 

Sale. Hornby Clockwork Railway with accessories; 

gauge 0; 30/-. Also Ensign Camera. f4.5 lens: £1.— 
Barrett-Lennard, 114, Lexham Gardens, Kensington 

W .8. 

,r Brownl". portrait attachment 

auu ^, — —* «w„, 8/-.— Lang, 17, Belmont Bath. 
Wanted. Adana No. 2 High Speed Hand Printing 
Machine, with or without type; write stating price to 

150, Grand Drive, London S.W.20. 

l/72nd Scale Model Aeroplanes (Military). 
Write for list— Bloor, 5, Dairyhouse Road, Derby. 

For Sale. Adana 1A Printing Machine, type, 
accessories; cost j£6; good condition; £2/5/-.— Red fern, 
122, Manchester Road, Wilmslow. 

Sale. Large amount of Rcd-Grcen Meccano, to be 
told separately. Stamp for list.— Ward, Church Street, 
Dufftown, Banffshire. 

Sale. Collection of 2,000 Mixed Stamps, la/ 
300 British Colonials, 6/-; or offers. 

" 2/-. Postage extra. 
Corny x Lane, Solihull, Warwickshire. 

Wanted. Second hand aero engine, any 

condition. Particulars and price to— 
Si Raitt, 72 Hilton Street, Aberdeen. 

Sale. Stamps complete with album, 150 Irench 
cols. Adolf Hitler issue. About 800 stamps of the 
world 15/-.— J* Skidmore, 87, Forest Road, Quinton, 

8/-. Cash with 
Newton Blossom ville, 




B 




* 



1938 "Modern 
-Burrows, 59 , 



Size 





— T 

Apply 




;ham 32, 
For Sale. 370 Stamps, 

Peter Finch, 

Turvey, Bedfordshire. 

Wanted. "Chums," particularly Volumes 1910 t< 
1917. State price.— Walker, 22, Heathfield Square 
Knutsford, Cheshire. 




THE 



i 



'M.M 



tf 



Binding cases for back 
numbers of the Magazine 
may be obtained from 

Messrs. Q + H. Baceman 

and Co., 23, Hanover 
Street, Liverpool. These 
are supplied In two sixes 
(1) for six copies price 
3/3 and (2) for twelve 
copies price 4/9 g post 
free In each case* The 

arc 






quarter of the sides are 

The 

the 



case 

name 
Is the 



sup* 
piled in what is known 
as "Quarter Basil, full 
cloth 11 — that is to say 
three-quarters of the 
sides are dark crimson 
cloth and the back and a 
dark crimson leather as shown here 
is tastefully embossed in gold with 
•'Meccano Magazine," and on the back 
name and volume number. 

Binding 6 and 12 copies. These binding cases 
are supplied so that readers may have their 
Magazines bound locally, but where desired, the 
firm mentioned above will bind Meccano Maga- 
zines ar a charge of 5/9 for six 'ssues or 7/6 
for twelve issues, including the cost of the 
binding and also return carriage, The covers of 
the Magazines may be included or omitted as 
required, but in the absence of any instructions 
to the contrary they will be included. 

Whilst the binding of the twelve 

is quite satisfactory, they form a rather 

volume and for that reason arrangements 
been made to bind six months* Magazines where 
so desired, as explained above. 




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List No. 11 M (containing over 1,200 titles of 
the world's aircraft) is now ready — price 2d, post 
free (or 4d. with specimen photograph). 



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LIVERPOOL 13, ENGLAND. 

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Ordering the "M.M." Overseas 

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Overseas readers are reminded that the prices 
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CANADA: Meccano Ltd. t 187-139, Church St., Toronto, 

UNITED STATES: Meccano Co, of America Inc. f 

New Haven, Conn., Meccano Co. of America 
Inc-, 200, Fifth Av,, New York. 

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